Difference Between Japanese and American TV Sets

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InTr4nceWeTrust
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Difference Between Japanese and American TV Sets

Post by InTr4nceWeTrust » Jul 9th, '07, 02:00

Maybe I didn't look hard enough, but anybody know this? Google search only found me difference between shows.
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Post by furransu » Jul 9th, '07, 02:06

japanese tv sets are mostly made in japan, american mostly in america :S lol

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Post by Puppet Princess » Jul 9th, '07, 02:11

Well, other then the obvious differences between eastern and western design and culture. I'd say they are pretty much the same.
Last edited by Puppet Princess on Jul 9th, '07, 02:40, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by XrayMind » Jul 9th, '07, 02:36

Funny replies. Here is the real answer. The old analog NTSC, there is no real different. Now, the new digital high def are different. In the US, we use ATSC for over the air and QAM for digital cable. While in Japan, they use ISDB. While all use MPEG4 for the video codec. And ISDB does use QAM for transmission, I am not sure how compatible they are. Well you can read more tech detail on Wikipedia.

I very sure that I don't want to use a HDTV made for Japan in the US.

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Post by InTr4nceWeTrust » Jul 9th, '07, 03:05

-_- @ furransu lol

@XrayMind
Ahhhh, thanks for the information. But are there many stations that still use analog NTSC? More specifically, if I purchased a portable TV from Japan, is it likely to still be analog NTSC? Sorry if that info is in those two articles. I'm reading it as we "speak".
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Post by XrayMind » Jul 9th, '07, 03:51

Yes, if it's a portable then it's most likely analog NTSC. The only different US and Japan analog is the black level. You will never not notice the different. If you do, just adjust the brightness on the TV.
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Post by InTr4nceWeTrust » Jul 9th, '07, 03:53

Ahhh, thanks a bunch, XrayMind. Time to do some shopping ^_^"
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Post by groink » Jul 9th, '07, 03:56

Another difference between the two is the closed-captioned signal. American TVs cannot view Japanese CC, and vise-versa.

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Post by spacecommand » Jul 9th, '07, 04:12

japanese tv sets are mostly made in japan, american mostly in america :S lol
Actually most American TV sets are made in Japan or China, its hard to actually find a large number of US made TVs, instead you have Sony, Toshiba, Panasonic being the big sellers of television sets in the US.

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Post by InTr4nceWeTrust » Jul 9th, '07, 20:15

thanks, groink. altho i don't really think CC will be too much of an issue for me.
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Post by jholic » Jul 10th, '07, 00:20

i was under the impression that jp sets used PAL (vice NTSC), but maybe that's just their dvd's.

i'm wondering if another consideration would also be the power requirements. i know that voltage is different between jp and usa.
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Post by InTr4nceWeTrust » Jul 10th, '07, 02:42

oooooh, i never thought about the power...lol, i'm gonna have to look into that. laptop w/ tv tuner...dont' want it to break because i forgot about the power source.

edit: Hm...same socket. The voltage is different though. Japan seems to use 100v while the US uses 120v. Most newer laptops should have the ability to work with a relatively wide range of voltage. yay ^_^
from Kichigaisensai @ japan-guide.com forum

Can you use Japanse appliances in the US?

I am an electrical engineer. My expert opinion is I would stay away from using any appliance that generates heat...such as a hairdryer (as previously mentioned) or a kotatsu or a boiler for tea water...unless you know what you are doing!!

Japan's electrical system is roughly the same as the US's. However, the US's voltage is 120Vac RMS (60Hz)while Japan's is 100Vac RMS (50 or 60Hz depending on region).

So, any heat generating device from Japan that is used in the US will get 20% hotter than it's design intended. The risk is damage to the device and/or fire...or injury of a person. Please be careful!!

That being said, you could use a transformer for such devices if you really must have them. But, heat generating devices are usually pretty high wattage...meaning you'd need some pretty hefty transformers to do the job.

As for electronics such as PCs, VCRs, TVs, etc...check the back side of the device or its external power supply (usually near where the power cord enters). Read what it says there. Laptop PCs, digital camera chargers and the like tend to accept a wide range of voltages because they are designed for export to many countries. My IBM laptop will accept 100-240V. The power supply takes care of converting the input voltage (whatever it may be) to the appropriate voltage used by the device.

As for TV's from Japan...they will work if the voltage range indicated on the back side includes 120V (if not, I wouldn't use it or even plug it in in the US). However, the channel frequencies for Japanese TV are different than American TV. So, it might work okay with a VCR or a satellite reciever (or cable). But, it will not accpet American over-the-air broadcasts. Your Japanese DVD player will not play discs made for use in the US (and vice-versa).

Be careful out there folks!
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Post by kyuuketsuki » Jul 14th, '07, 16:35

I think that PAL is primarily used in European countries. The US and Japan use NTSC. However the power is definitely different. You can buy a transformer that will convert the power and you plug the TV into, then into the wall. It's been a while since I've been in Japan, but I'm pretty sure the channels are different. Many of the cable stations in the US go beyond 100 while the Japanese TVs won't go that high.

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Post by XrayMind » Jul 14th, '07, 18:02

Actually most Asian countries use PAL, but Japan nor South Korean is not one of them. Here is the wikipedia map that shows which TV systems they use. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:PAL-NTSC-SECAM.svg

As for power. While Japan does use the same type of power plug as the US, the power is little bit different. But I found most, but all, electronics come with power supply that support a range of voltage. So just read the power supply label. If the label say "input 100~120VAC 60Hz", it would work in many countries that use 60Hz AC supply. Actually, a lot of electronics will labels that say "input 100~240VAC 50~60Hz". If you have computer laptop, it would most likely to have that second label. Because I have uses my made for US laptop in Hong Kong with a plug adapter attached. BTW Hong Kong is 240VAC 50Hz, so my normally using US 120VAC 60Hz laptop didn't blew up.

Anyway, you be surprise how many electronic equipments have that second label. But remember, it's cheaper to make one power supply that works everywhere. They just give you the correct power cord for the territory it will be sold in. When you have a chance, go look at all those black power supply blocks. Some built-in power supply equipments will also have the second label.

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