"I want a korean boyfriend"

Anhyong haseyo. Post Korean related stuff here.
User avatar
lolita637
Posts: 58
Joined: Feb 20th, '06, 00:25
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Contact:

Post by lolita637 » Oct 31st, '06, 05:20

hmm I dunno.. it'd be cool to date one, but I wouldn't get all serious and stuff.. for one I'd looove to atleast see Song Il-gook face(up close and personal) and that's about it :lol
Image

credits to Jennie from Soompi Forums

User avatar
muffin707
Posts: 30
Joined: Feb 16th, '06, 15:43

Post by muffin707 » Nov 2nd, '06, 02:12

groink wrote:Or how about this t-shirt idea: On the front, it'll say "I watch Korean dramas, and from it subscribe to the idea that, against any other form of logic, all Korean men are beautiful and basically the cat's pajamas. Therefore, a Korean man is the ideal one for me." And then on the back: "Aza Aza Fighting!"

I mean, if you're going to send a message out to the world, you might as well let it all out!

--- groink


keke, that crack me up, you just made my day. :mrgreen:

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Nov 6th, '06, 01:39

Browsing soompi, I found a really interesting article that I thought some people could find interesting. I think it quite accurately explains the appeal of the Korean man.

link: http://metromix.chicagotribune.com/news ... brity_heds




In Japan, a yen among women for 'Seoulmate'

By Anthony Faiola, The Washington Post. Special correspondent Joohee Cho contributed to this report

TOKYO -- Thin and gorgeous in a slinky black dress and Mikimoto pearls, with a diamond Tiffany pendant, 26-year-old Kazumi Yoshimura already has looks, cash and accessories. There's only one thing this single Japanese woman says she needs to find eternal bliss--a Korean man.

She may just have to get in line. In recent years, the wild success of male celebrities from South Korea--sensitive men but totally ripped--has redefined what Asian women want, from Bangkok to Beijing to Taipei to Tokyo. Gone are the martial arts movie heroes and the stereotypical macho men of mainstream Asian television. Today, South Korea's trendsetting screen stars and singers dictate everything from what hair gels people use in Vietnam to what jeans are bought in China.

Yet for thousands of smitten Japanese women like Yoshimura, collecting the odd poster or DVD is no longer enough. They've set their sights far higher--settling for nothing less than a real Seoulmate.

Yoshimura signed up last year with Rakuen Korea, a Japanese-Korean matchmaking service, to find her own Korean bachelor. And she is hardly alone. More than 6,400 female clients have signed up with the company, which says its popularity has skyrocketed since 2004, when "Winter Sonata" became the first of many hot Korean television dramas to hit Japan. Even in Shinjuku ni-chome, Tokyo's biggest gay district, niche bars with names such as Seoul Man have sprouted.

"South Koreans are so sweet and romantic--not at all like Japanese guys, who never say 'I love you,"' Yoshimura said as she waited for her blind date, a single Korean man, in the 50th-floor bar of a chic Tokyo skyscraper. A telephone operator who lives with her parents in Hiroshima, she has spent thousands of dollars on her quest for a Korean husband, flying to Seoul 10 times in the past two years and bullet-training to Tokyo for seven blind dates with Korean men.

So far, though, she hasn't found the one she's looking for.

"Maybe I'm living in a fantasy world," she said, pouting. "Maybe I'm looking for the TV stars I can't really have. But we are all allowed a dream, aren't we?"


'Korean Wave' craze

In part, the new allure of Korean men can be traced to a larger phenomenon known as the "Korean Wave," a term coined a few years ago by Beijing journalists startled by the growing popularity of South Koreans and South Korean goods in China. Now, the craze for all things Korean has spread across Asia, driving regional sales of everything from cars to kimchi.

Meanwhile, the number of foreign tourists traveling to South Korea leapt from 2.8 million in 2003 to 3.7 million in 2004. The bulk of the growth, South Korean tourism officials say, stemmed from Korean Wave-loving Asian women. Partial statistics for 2005 indicate the tide has not yet let up.

For the South Koreans--who have long suffered discrimination in Japan and who have hardly been known as sex symbols--it all comes as something of a shock.

Korean male celebrities are now among the highest-paid actors outside Hollywood. According to the South Korean media, "Winter Sonata" star Bae Yong Jun--whose character stood by his first love through 10 years of car accidents and amnesia--is now charging $5 million a film, the steepest price anywhere in Asia. In a few short years, Bae is said to have accumulated a merchandising and acting-fee empire worth an estimated $100 million. At least nine other Korean male stars earn more than $10 million a year, according to a list published in June by the Seoul-based Sports Hankook newspaper.


Stalking the stars

In Seoul, the neon-lit streets are mobbed these days by women, many sporting rhinestone-studded T-shirts emblazoned with images of their favorite Korean stars. Some fans have been known to stake out famous eateries for hours in the hopes of catching a glimpse of their celluloid beaus.

"It's still a little hard to believe that it's gone this far," said tall, tanned Jang Dong Gun, now one of the highest-paid actors in Asia, during an interview in Seoul.

Jang said he was shocked when, during his first trip to Vietnam in 1998 to promote his new Korean TV drama, thousands of women mobbed his plane at the Hanoi airport and an armada of female fans on motor scooters chased his car all the way to his hotel.

In 2001, the Seoul-based manufacturer Daewoo Electronics hired him as its Vietnam spokesman. Over the past five years, the company said, its refrigerators' market share in Vietnam went from a blip to 34 percent.

"If we can give them a little more joy in their life and show them another side of Korea, then I can only see that as a plus for us and them," he said.

In China, South Korean programs broadcast on government TV networks now account for more than all other foreign programs combined, including those from the United States and Japan, according to South Korean government statistics. Even in Mexico--land of the telenovela--a flock of women stood outside South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun's hotel during a recent visit, holding placards with Korean stars' names.

In the United States, the Seoul-based singer Rain played two sold-out nights at Madison Square Garden in 2005. Also last year, sinewy Daniel Dae Kim, the Korean-born actor from the hit show "Lost," was the only Asian to land a spot in People magazine's "Sexiest Men Alive" edition.


The Italians of Asia

Entertainment industry leaders in Seoul credit the phenomenon to good marketing coupled with an uncanny response throughout Asia to the expressive nature of the South Koreans--long dubbed the Italians of Asia. A hearty diet and two years of forced military duty, industry leaders and fans insist, have also made young South Korean men among the buffest in Asia. Most important, however, has been the South Korean entertainment industry's perfection of the strong, silent type on screen--typically rich, kind men with coincidentally striking looks and a tendency to shower women with unconditional love.

"It's a type of character that doesn't exist much in Asian movies and television, and now it's what Asian women think Korean men are like," said Kim Ok Hyun, director of Star M, a major star management company in Seoul.

"But to tell you the truth," she said. "I still haven't met a real one who fits that description."

Though the Korean Wave hit Japan relatively late, washing ashore only within the past 24 to 36 months, the country has quickly become the largest market for Korean stars. Bae remains the biggest, but his supremacy is being challenged. Actor Kwon Sang Woo, for instance, is charging $200 for some seats at an upcoming "fan meeting" in Tokyo. Thousands of Japanese are scrambling for a chance to watch him play games with fans, chat and perform little song-and-dance numbers. Some tickets are going for as much as $500 on online auction sites.


Lucrative fad

Almost all the major Korean male stars have opened lucrative "official stores" in Tokyo. In the three-story boutique of Ryu Siwon, a baby-faced Korean actor-crooner who sings in phonetic Japanese for the local market, the top floor boasts a re-creation of his living room, complete with a life-size, high-tech plastic model of Ryu lounging casually on a white leather sofa. It has become a meeting place of sorts for his Japanese fans, where a gaggle of women ages 17 to 61 sat and stared longingly at his statue on a recent afternoon.

Some call it a fad. But Yoshimura -- whose latest blind date turned out to be a slightly paunchy Korean computer programmer -- says she is nevertheless digging in her extraordinarily high heels for the long run.

"I intend to keep looking until I find the right one," she said.

richardli
Posts: 47
Joined: Nov 27th, '06, 14:39

online site

Post by richardli » Dec 5th, '06, 09:44

try finding a Korean guy here www.seoulstylefriends.com. Good luck
Wacky Japanese Videos and hot idols at JAPANSUGOI.COM

eaachh
Posts: 113
Joined: Jul 8th, '05, 02:28
Location: Bkk, Thailand
Contact:

Post by eaachh » Dec 7th, '06, 14:26

Sounds interesting thread, haha. When I first read the topic, I thought I must leave some opinion here but I don't know how to show my thought. Umm...Korean guys are interesting as I am the same Asianic. Many of us in Thailand are getting crazy with Korean famous stars, me too. However, we are firstly attracted by appearance but finally will discover by deep learning each other no matter they are Korean or another ehtnics. In the same way, surroundings are quite important if they are different by geographics or cultures.

P.S. : Is there any Korean guys for me ? :mrgreen:

User avatar
YuInSoo
Posts: 16
Joined: May 14th, '06, 20:24
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

Post by YuInSoo » Dec 8th, '06, 04:07

lolz~~
im korean guy...
i want a japanese girlfriend~!!! or a korean girlfriend...
dang.. i sound so desperate~~ nvm...
LOLz~~
Image
Image

Van Ly
Posts: 2
Joined: Dec 8th, '06, 04:05

Post by Van Ly » Dec 8th, '06, 04:28

i'm chinese and my parent wants me to marry the same race...
so.. my guesses are.. most asian parents want their children to marry the same race...
well, i could be wrong tho..

Ayulyn
Posts: 130
Joined: Jan 9th, '06, 07:00
Location: Alaska

...

Post by Ayulyn » Dec 8th, '06, 04:47

In all honestly, you can't necessarily help who you like or love. I hate it when people say "I only date ____ men or ____ women". Its pointless, because you'll date whoever your heart desires.
You can't control who you have feelings for, whether it be a white man, or an asian man.

Not speaking to anyone here..I just read it on myspace once and almost blew a fuse at the thought of someone honestly saying they only date Japanese boys. If you actually try to stop yourself from liking someone because they aren't your ideal types, its a little stupid really.

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 8th, '06, 04:51

James Kim, the Korean-American found dead in the woods the other day, was married to a white woman.

They had the cutest mixed-race daughter! I hope my future children will be as adorable as her. >_< I feel so sorry for this beautiful little girl...

Image

May he rest in peace...

User avatar
portiaisabel
Posts: 46
Joined: Dec 4th, '06, 08:28
Location: in the heart... of... inside of.....

Post by portiaisabel » Dec 8th, '06, 05:14

that girl's definitely cute.....

here in the philippines theres a korean craze.... not to mention there are a lot of koreans here......
we even have a korean actress here..... which is weird but ok
but i would definetly want a guy instead of her............
promise there are a lot of koreans here in my university alone and the area i think theyr are here for the education..... alot cheaper and better..............we filipinos in english and allll, well not all of them are cute............ right now i only found 2 hot korean guys here in the proximity............... i only know one of them......... shox........~_~

yieebo
Posts: 85
Joined: Aug 7th, '06, 09:41

Post by yieebo » Dec 8th, '06, 05:26

^that's so sad about James Kim, my heart goes out to his adorable family. so tragic.

i'm off topic, i don't want a Korean boyfriend because I'm not gay lol... but i am half Filipino, half Caucasian and i think it's fine to know what you want in life. if the desire is sound, and strong enough then follow your dreams... as long as you are not totally delusional about a false sense of reality.

at one time i was in a Chinese "craze" i loved Chinese everything, art, philosophy, style, history, culture, cuisine, martial arts etc... i wanted a Chinese girlfriend and potential wife. then i realized i seemed nuts about it all, there are over 1-billion Chinese they don't need some wanna be Chinese dude acting like some neo-mandarin lol, so over the years i mellowed with all that stuff. i still like a lot of asian cultures, but i don't obsess about any one thing any longer.

in short though, i wouldn't ever personally be worried about racial mixing, i don't think we are going to run out of Chinese people, or white people etc. any time soon.

ayan_tf
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 25th, '06, 04:53

Post by ayan_tf » Dec 15th, '06, 13:48

warlock110 wrote:i didn't wanna say this, but this thread annoy the hell out of me. so i'm gonna say it anyways and i'm gonna be very straight, so it might offend alot of people.

have u ever think the reason is.... let say alot simpler than the "family tradtion problem"? have u ever thought maybe, just maybe you wasn't good enough? speaking from a guy perpsective, if a guy think u're worthy to pursue or that he really really like u. u gonna have to put about 20 families in front of him to make him stop going after u. this may sound hash but it's the truth. i think people are just blaming on something else to save their selfesteem. Myself i'm not great or good, i would even say underaverage, but atleast i see things through and through, making up excuse for your fault isn't gonna fix anything, get up and fix your own problem, it's not gonna go away by itself.

PS: i have a feeling i'm gonna get flame so bad for this haha.


i so agree wth u..when i first read about thz my first thought was were all these true??i thought true love doesnt give a damn about other things including races n everythg..if one really love d other, then despite all barriers, problems n wt so ever they wil go after their love..if they dont, then it's not a true love afterall..tht's wt i think..so let's not very if u r korean or not n u want to hv a korean bf..bt make sure u are willing to do a little sacrification for ur true love..well, it's all about true love nway n we shouldnt underestimate wt a true love can do..
well, of course this is only my opinion...

User avatar
cherryflavored_Keita
Posts: 23
Joined: Nov 22nd, '04, 01:05
Location: Nashville, TN, US

Post by cherryflavored_Keita » Dec 19th, '06, 05:21

ayan_tf wrote:
warlock110 wrote:i didn't wanna say this, but this thread annoy the hell out of me. so i'm gonna say it anyways and i'm gonna be very straight, so it might offend alot of people.

have u ever think the reason is.... let say alot simpler than the "family tradtion problem"? have u ever thought maybe, just maybe you wasn't good enough? speaking from a guy perpsective, if a guy think u're worthy to pursue or that he really really like u. u gonna have to put about 20 families in front of him to make him stop going after u. this may sound hash but it's the truth. i think people are just blaming on something else to save their selfesteem. Myself i'm not great or good, i would even say underaverage, but atleast i see things through and through, making up excuse for your fault isn't gonna fix anything, get up and fix your own problem, it's not gonna go away by itself.

PS: i have a feeling i'm gonna get flame so bad for this haha.


i so agree wth u..when i first read about thz my first thought was were all these true??i thought true love doesnt give a damn about other things including races n everythg..if one really love d other, then despite all barriers, problems n wt so ever they wil go after their love..if they dont, then it's not a true love afterall..tht's wt i think..so let's not very if u r korean or not n u want to hv a korean bf..bt make sure u are willing to do a little sacrification for ur true love..well, it's all about true love nway n we shouldnt underestimate wt a true love can do..
well, of course this is only my opinion...


All of this sounds absolutely WONDERFUL on paper, you know? Everybody loving each other just for who they are... ahh, how nice. But seriously, we don't live in that world. The fact is, it is VERY difficult to date Korean men if you are a foreigner. It is getting easier, and some parents and Korean men really don't care. But there are some who do, so don't discredit these girls' problem as their own fault.

I have been dating a natural-born Korean guy (meaning not Korean-American or anything) for almost 2 years. He is absolutely fantastic, and has no problem with the fact that I am a caucasian and American. His parents have no problem with him dating me either. However, notice I said "dating". He tells me that they are getting worried that we are getting so serious, and "they will never have a daughter-in-law that doesn't speak Korean". Haha, I thought I could just learn Korean language, but that's apparently not what they meant. Basically, in their minds it's okay for a Korean guy to "have fun" with a foreigner, but she is not to be treated like a worthy bridal candidate. That really hurt my feelings, you know?

So what am I supposed to do about that, huh? I've been nothing but nice to them and I love my boyfriend very much. Will I give him up? Never, or not without a fight. But another (usually good) thing about Korean society is the importance they place on respecting family. If we were to ever get marriage-level serious and his parents order him to break up with me, I know he will fight them. But for how long? Will he give in, even though he loves me, in order to respect them? I don't know... I hope my problem never gets too serious!! But regardless, I wouldn't say that was my fault in any way, and I really couldn't blame him that much. And what could I do? Stalk him? Come on.

So really, you guys, unfortunately, life is not that simple. How can you tell someone who gave it their all "you were a bad girlfriend"?

My heart goes out to the girls who want a Korean boyfriend!
Image
My icon was made by alecsa_chan on LJ and my signature was made by me.

User avatar
simplycheen
Posts: 80
Joined: Aug 9th, '06, 17:23
Location: maNiLa

Post by simplycheen » Dec 19th, '06, 06:32

actually, almost all asian guyz are cute...but i must say that korean guyz really catch my attention...

im not expectin to have a korean boyfriend...friends will do... :P

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 19th, '06, 17:08

The last time I was in Seoul, I saw quite a few ads in the city that advised Korean men to marry foreign women who were willing to bear children as a try to counter the low child-birth rates in South Korea.

Best of luck to you, Keita. Just remember that with each passing year, Korea is opening itself more and foreigners are becoming more acceptable as time goes by. In fact, one of the English teachers who worked at the same hagwon as me just got married to her new husband a month ago, contributing to the skyrocketing rate of international marriages. If your boyfriend is an oldest son, I'm sure you do know that, as his wife, you will be expected to take care of his parents? Perhaps this is a big reason why his parents aren't so willing to accept you yet, the might assume that you, as an emancipated Caucasian woman, will not want to carry on this family tradition. They might also be worried that you won't be able to communicate with them very well, so I definitely advise you to learn Korean and to learn it well. Nothing is certain, but if you truly love him, I think there's a good chance his parents will accept you if you make the extra effort and are willing to bow to certain unpleasant Korean customs. My boy is also an oldest son and I know that if we do end up married, I'll have to look after his mother until her death. Thankfully, she likes me and has already mentioned that she would like us to be together forever, but I know that certain things will be expected of me that the parents of a Western man wouldn't ever ask me for.

So yeah, it's different and it's difficult. I think with most Korean men, you don't only need to embrace him, but also a whole lot of Korean culture you may or may not like.

Edit: speaking of, another friend of mine just got married to his Korean girlfriend as well, and he's already frustrated with her because she doesn't want to leave Korea or accept American citizenship, so he basically needs to stay there indefinitively. :lol

User avatar
fillupon
Posts: 3
Joined: Dec 19th, '06, 21:37
Location: socal

Post by fillupon » Dec 20th, '06, 10:01

not all korean parents are like that. i'm a korean dude and my parents never said anything about me having to marry a korean girl. i think they got used to me hanging out with mexican and black girls haha.

gabbypalacios
Posts: 31
Joined: Dec 20th, '06, 01:35

Post by gabbypalacios » Dec 24th, '06, 00:14

I think, and i'm sorry if someone has already gone over this, that the thing here is that if you're living in the West, for example the US, then its so easy to marry someone of your own kind. Its not so hard for a white person to marry a white person. We also, living in the US, arent as traditional in our views about keeping our bloodlines pure, like the koreans are. It is not uncommon that a white man marry a spanish girl or vice versa. So i guess what im trying to say is that its the whole exotic perception. Western men love exotic women, and western women also love exotic men. Lets face it, koreans are HOT. Sure they may not be the "hottest" but they are hot. ;)

User avatar
PJB
Posts: 184
Joined: Apr 1st, '05, 13:14
Location: Seoul

Post by PJB » Dec 24th, '06, 11:38

Néa, how long did you study Korean before semi-mastering it, or are you still working on that part? ;)

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 24th, '06, 12:57

I've been studying for 1 and a half years now, which isn't long enough to master much of anything, but I'd say I know it better than most people who've studied it for a comparable amount of time (unless they studied it in Korea for the entire time) because my boyfriend and several other Korean friends have looked after my progress and I've been able to practice conversation with them every day. I still can't have any meaningful or abstract conversations and I still lack vocabulary (Korean has lots of words with only very subtle differences), but I'm hoping to get pretty good once I head back to Korea and enroll at University there. My boyfriend is very smart and speaks English extremely well, much better than I speak Korean, but I want to learn it, not only to speak to his friends and family, but also because I wouldn't mind living there for a long time.

He used to find it very strange that I wanted to learn his language so badly, but I think he by now appreciates my sincere efforts to embrace his culture of which language is a big and important part. My first language is German and my mother doesn't understand any English -- he's taking German lessons now to be able to talk to my mother and, because he's smart, is making great progress. Dating him is definitely more complicated and demanding than dating a German guy, but given how much I've been able to learn from him and previous foreign boyfriends, I don't think I could ever go back to dating German men. I would miss this lasting challenge of linguistic and cultural exchange and the challenge to adapt to new societal pressures. I truly feel it's making me a better person. A worldlier, more culturally sensitive person, at least.

User avatar
PJB
Posts: 184
Joined: Apr 1st, '05, 13:14
Location: Seoul

Post by PJB » Dec 24th, '06, 21:34

Looks like your on an enlightening journey of self-discovery, aswell as studying hard. Sounds a lot like me! Having the benefit of a Korean boyfriend to guide your grasp of the language is a very useful thing - and despite not having a Korean girlfriend myself, I've found that creating a routine for daily uptake is beneficial to me. I've even drafted out what I should do each day, from continually reminding myself of the sounds of letters, to reading up on history and culture. I've always felt that I've had a somewhat slow brain, and some days I really do feel like I'm the dumb person in the crowd - But then I look at myself, and what things I've learned over the years and try to remind myself that I'm not that stupid afterall.

You have a strong, educated and refined command of English. Aren't you about 18 or something? You sound like a prodigy to me in the making. How do you plan to support yourself going into university in Korea? I mean, not only the costs - But what about the qualifications and such, I mean, what are the requirements for such a course? I looked over some of the University information from Seoul last year, and most of what I saw was just expensive courses, and no real prior knowledge or certificates required.

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 24th, '06, 23:00

Well, I'm hoping to enroll at Sogang University to attend 4 hour of Korean classes a day for at least half a year. The tuition fees make up about 3 million won, but I got my mother to pay half of it while I'll use my savings to pay for the remaining half. I hope that I will be able to give English lessons over the summer and maybe during school breaks to help out with the rent and such, though my monthly pocket money from both mommy and daddy should be able to cover most of it. I admit I'm a spoiled little girly. :lol I might actually want to finish the course, even - I should manage to skip a level or two because I don't think I belong in the absolute beginners' class anymore and the entire course is made up of only 5 or 6 levels lasting 3 months each.

Requirements for said course are nothing but a High School diploma and in addition to that, you can't even get a real degree upon completing it - however, it's probably the best and fastest way to learn Korean, for it not only offers a good teaching schedule complete with tests and homework probably equal or superior to any Korean classes in the West, but also language immersion even out of the classroom. Seeing as how mastering Korean is way more important to me than any degrees at the moment, I'd much rather study Korean there than finish up a BA in Korean Studies here and come out of college speaking only half the Korean I would after actually living there. I'm not really sure what I'll be doing afterwards, whether I will stay in Korea to get a real degree after the Korean course or whether I will return or even go to another place altogether, but I shall see.

And yeah, I'm not that old. And yeah, I guess I'm not that bad with languages. But you should see my brain when it sees calculus or... any advanced math, really. THAT's when I think, "gawrsh, I'm, like, stupid." :lol

User avatar
PJB
Posts: 184
Joined: Apr 1st, '05, 13:14
Location: Seoul

Post by PJB » Dec 25th, '06, 09:38

Hey, I looked at the exact same University. Maybe we'll be studying together! :D Bahaha, yes, you sound very spoiled. I could never convince my parents to even help me with a plane ticket to Korea, let alone pay for any education and/or accomodation. 3 million won is for the whole 6 months? Hm, I'll have to check the material again. Sadly I have to save money for such a thing, so... I need to calculate for myself the living expenses, flight cost, education cost... And then I have to save up the right amount. ;)

Javis
Posts: 2
Joined: Dec 25th, '06, 09:44

Post by Javis » Dec 25th, '06, 09:49

Néa Vanille wrote: In fact, one of the English teachers who worked at the same hagwon as me just got married to her new husband a month ago, contributing to the skyrocketing rate of international marriages.


Hrmm... wondering how you're doing that
a) without a degree
b) without being from an English speaking country

That rules out an E2 visa...

User avatar
sweetsamurai
Posts: 27
Joined: Apr 2nd, '06, 16:42
Location: england
Contact:

Post by sweetsamurai » Dec 25th, '06, 10:13

I'm going to get my self a korean boyfriend when I stay in Seoul.

Then when I go to japan, I'll get a japanese boyfriend.

Then when I go to China, i'll get a chinese boyfriend.

Then taiwan.... :wub: :wub: :wub: :wub: :wub: :wub: :wub: :alcoholic:

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 25th, '06, 16:32

Javis wrote:
Néa Vanille wrote: In fact, one of the English teachers who worked at the same hagwon as me just got married to her new husband a month ago, contributing to the skyrocketing rate of international marriages.


Hrmm... wondering how you're doing that
a) without a degree
b) without being from an English speaking country

That rules out an E2 visa...


Did you register just to ask me that? :lol

That hagwon was owned by a friend of my boyfriend's father, but I didn't get paid a single cent for helping out there (I could have, but I didn't want to violate any laws). I did it solely for personal experience, to find out whether I really wanted to work in the education field in the future and also whether I personally felt qualified enough to teach. I didn't do it for very long, just long enough to get an idea what it was like to be a teacher and like I said, I didn't get in any way reimbursed, monetarily or otherwise.

I've been tutoring classmates and friends all throughout High School and I'm hoping to continue with tutoring friends and classmates in Korea in exchange for dinners, Korean tutoring or maybe little money. Student to student tutoring, essentially. I'm quite law-abiding, so even though I could earn lots of money teaching full-time, working as a bard maid or in some other shady business, I'm not going to. I would never want to risk deportation and thankfully, I'm in a position where I don't need money that desperately.

But hey, PJB, that would actually work out for you in case you have a degree. You could work in Korea and practice your Korean after teaching, and you could earn quite a bit, too. Maybe you should consider that.

Javis
Posts: 2
Joined: Dec 25th, '06, 09:44

Post by Javis » Dec 27th, '06, 05:29

I didn't register just to ask you a question. That just happened to be my first post.

Language exchange is certainly a great way to learn, especially with somebody that you spend a lot of time with. That way, you can get beyond superficial conversations and just learn new things more naturally.

A language course will help you with higher level proficiency, because how often are you going to talk about economics or international politics in Korean with your boyfriend? You seem pretty academic, though, so don't forget to finish your degree at some point. You could even transfer to a Korean university if your language skills get good enough.

kimja805
Posts: 1
Joined: Dec 27th, '06, 07:33

Post by kimja805 » Dec 27th, '06, 08:53

Wow, first of all I thought this was a very interesting read.

Interracial marriage has never been looked upon favorably in the past in Korea. It is arguable that Korea and Japan are the world's most homogeneous/pure-blooded countries of today. If you have USA/Britain on one end of the spectrum for interracial/mixed blood; then you would have Korea and Japan on the very opposite end (most Koreans you meet will probably tell you that they are pure Korean and they do not know of any other race in their bloodlines). ...which was why I was shocked when news headlines were coming up regarding the sudden surge in Korean men + foreign brides. Honestly, I never thought it would ever happen. (not while I am alive anyways)

As of current, the figures for interracial marriage THIS YEAR in Korea is actually higher than 5%-- It's more like 10%. Just to clarify, this 10% means that 10% of the total marriages in 2006 were interracial (while 90% of marriages in 2006 were Korean-to-Korean). (This does not mean that 10% of families in Korea are interracial; interracial families in Korea are very hard to come by unless you live near a US military base.) 10% does sound like a lot but the majority of these numbers are due to the Korean men in the farms/country side (which comprises a very small population considering the majority of Koreans live in the cities). The Korean women do not want to marry these farm men b/c that would mean a life of labor. Instead, the Korean women are leaving the country side and heading to the cities to marry city men for a life of comfort. It's unsurprising to find Korean men in the countryside in their forties who are unable to marry (cuz no girls!). This forces them to look abroad-- mainly in third-world Southeast Asian countries/Mongolia/China/Russian. This is more of an act of last resort/being desperate rather than free choice. They say 33% of the total marriages made in 2006 in the countryside are interracial.

I think the view on interracial marriages is definitely changing... but things will definitely look turbulent before getting better for a while. Many of the mixed kids are often teased while growing up (just for looking different and b/c of language). If you've noticed, half Korean children don't ever come out looking like a full Korean does (duh). Also, if the mother is the foreigner, the toddlers often have difficulty picking up the Korean language as quick as their full Korean counterparts. Many of these mixed children often become loners and have low self-esteem. Some even drop-out of school. Yes, this is very sad and wrong, but it's reality. (Even in the USA, kids are teased if they don't wear the right brands or they dress funny; as long as people have eyes, the person that appears "different" is a target; even moreso, in a homogeneous society like Korea).

I grew up attending an American foreign school located on a military base in Korea. There were probably more half-Koreans than there were full Koreans, whites, or blacks. What I have noticed was, the full-Koreans tend to group with themselves. The whites w/ the whites; blacks w/ blacks. The half-Koreans usually grouped with themselves or the whites most of the time. However, there were a FEW exceptions in which half-Koreans were actually a part of the full-Korean cliques. And in these FEW exceptions, the half-Koreans spoke PERFECT Korean (due to speaking it w/ their Korean mothers). In heterogeneous USA, half-Koreans will not likely be pulling their hair out over being discriminated against. But in homogeneous Korea, most likely he or she will. Of course my halfKorean classmates did not face any of this discrimination as the school was located on a US military base -- kind of like a mini-America community in Korea. However, those biracial children who are not from military families (and thus do not have the protection of a US military base environment)often attend Korean schools and face discrimination from their peers.

For some reason, the thought of a Korean woman with a Caucasian man has never been weird. It may be because a lot of my class-mates in elementary had parents like this... But I don't recall a single case amongst my classmates where it was the other way around (Korean men + foreign women)... Of course there is nothing morally wrong w/ this; but it will take some getting used to.. I must admit.

Interracial marriage is nothing new actually (particularly b/w Korean women + American men).. but what has kept Korea so homogeneous was the fact that these interracial couples often left Korea (which was back then undeveloped) to live in more prosperous USA. However, things are changing. Now that Korea is developed and Korean men are marrying interracially, often these interracial couples (Korean men + foreigner) choose to settle in Korea (especially if the bride comes from a third-world country).

I think Korean men seem to have an attraction for Caucasian women. Koreans often regard Caucasians as beautiful for their facial characteristics (pale skin, big eyes, high-pointy noses) as well as their figures (more curvacious, tall). The attraction is definitely there, but I wonder how many could actually marry. I do believe there is some truth to what some of the posters said on this forum -- that Korean men want to date white women mostly for experimental/curiosity reasons.

Or it may just be a phase-- When I finally moved over to the states for high school, I have never seen a Southeast Asian or Hispanic women before. They looked so exotic and I was quite attracted to them-- it was something NEW from seeing Korean women all the time; In Korea, all you see is Koreans and not much of anything else. I even dated some of them. However, after living in the USA for like 4 years or so, much of that fascination for these different races kind of faded. It was like a phase. The exoticness kind of wore off, and I realized how much I missed being connected to someone by culture and language. It really made me realize how much I LOVE Korean women.

Times are definitely changing, and it is true Korea is becoming more and more diverse. However, at the same time, this may also be sad....

Those same features that you all claim to love about Korean males (particular skintone, eye-shape, nose, height, build) may not be around many, many years from now. "Worst"-case scenario, if every native Korean man in South Korea was matched up with a foreigner bride, that would mean the extinction of the full-Korean race. Your children will not look like a full-Korean, that is for sure. And when these half-children have children with each other, they STILL won't produce children that look full-Korean. And thus, those "Korean" eyes, "Korean" hair, "Korean" build, and all other visible characteristics that are "Korean" will be gone. Sure the population would still have some Korean features (ie: a half-child w/ Caucasian brown-hair w/ Korean eyes) but you will not find all those Korean features all-together, on the same person, like you do on a full-Korean. This isn't anything to worry about in the USA; but if it happens in the country of South Korea- where full-Koreans are made.. then there's the risk of altering the genes of Koreans for good. The new actors/actressses in Korean dramas will not look like the actors/actresses (that you love so much) of today.

No, there is nothing MORALLY wrong about this, and you know, it's part of globalization... but at the same time, it's still kind of sad that many, many years from now, full-Koreans will not exist if the interracial marriage rate continues to skyrocket. If you still want to see those "Korean" features on those dramas, you may wish that the interracial marriage rate stays relatively low. Or else the Koreans of the future may not look much like the Koreans of today.
Last edited by kimja805 on Dec 27th, '06, 10:56, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
PJB
Posts: 184
Joined: Apr 1st, '05, 13:14
Location: Seoul

Post by PJB » Dec 27th, '06, 09:40

Kimja, what you just described, is a process that countries like the United Kingdom began to go through 50-100 years ago. Even down to the teasing of kids that different. It's the "teething" troubles of an emerging global society. Even today the UK has the exaxt problems as you described in Korea, with seperation of cultures and such things. But there is light at the end of the tunnel, and hope for a brighter future. Korea will change over time, as change is inevitable. I've always seen Korea as socially similar to the UK of the past (step back in time and you see how similar the social system in UK used to be) and possibly other countries.

But think of this. Many thousands of years ago, we all came from the same place. We're all distantly related, and one day, we'll all return to the same place as our cultures begin to merge. It's a sad thing that unique identify may eventually fade, but that won't happen for a long time, assuming the world is here to support us. As time passes, civilisations rise and fall beneath the sand due to war, environment and global change. One day we'll all have to rely on each other to survive on this planet, so these small steps towards turning into a global village are a step not only in the right direction, but also the direction we need to take inorder to survive.

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 27th, '06, 13:30

Kimja, I'm actually VERY surprised that you name foreign male/Korean female as 'more acceptable' than the reverse. As far as I understand Korean culture, the blood line along with the last name is always passed on from the male - logic tells me that in the view of any old-fashioned Korean, the child of a Korean man with a foreign woman would be more Korean than the reverse. The child would, after all, carry a Korean blood line and could produce children with another full-blooded Korean who might be 1/4 foreign, but still look Korean AND carry the blood line to identify him or her as such. The child of a foreign man could never be accepted as Korean because it was now the carrier of a foreign blood line, or am I wrong? Logic tells me that the child of a foreign man would forever lose its Korean (racial) identity in the eyes of old-fashioned Koreans, whereas this wouldn't necessarily be the case in the reverse due to the ancient belief of a man's stronger blood. The first president of South Korea was even married to a white, Austrian woman, Francisca Donner. Everybody knows that Korean men are harder to marry than women because women are just 'given away' while the son and his wife stay with the family for life, but I always thought the children had it a little better due to the blood line belief.

One of my best acquantainces from Berlin is also a half-Korean with a German mother. He was born in Germany, the country of his mother, but he's been back to Korea a lot since from when he was as young as 8. Most of what he tells me about his visits there kind of confirm most of what I was expecting - he says that most Koreans treated him politely, but he still felt that they thought of him as a foreigner, much like they treat me or any other given obvious foreigner. Reactions ranged from interest to fear to blatant indifference, but from what I've been able to gather, open racism was not one of the things he encountered and he managed to build up a solid circle of friends there. He had the priviledge of not having had to go to school there, though he often says he would have liked to experience it. He has a Korean girlfriend now and wants to move back to Korea as soon as he can - so being there can't have been that traumatic for him if he chooses to go back so willingly. Culturally, he is German - his looks, however, are a good blend. Think Daniel Henney, just a little less handsome. :lol Now, one of the most interesting things he told me was that people warmed up to him considerably once he mentioned that it was his father, not his mother, who was Korean.

I always thought this blood line deal was also the reason why the Korean government itself is very supportive of Korean male/foreign female couples but less so of foreign male/Korean female (the Korean government - or any sub-organizations thereof - are actually helping those farmers out financially in order to fly to Thailand or Vietnam to find a bride. And, like I said, I saw advertisements for foreign brides even in Seoul to counter the women shortage in Korea. I guess Korea is by now more occupied with producing more people to help the economy along than with any racial purity stuff.)

Another thing that puzzled me was the foreign male/Korean female deal being better because of linguistic reasons. Why in the world? In my logic, Korean male/foreign female would be heaps better because children traditionally have more contact to their mothers, who would speak in English to them, while they would be bombarded with Korean input and output at pre-school, TV, radio, when daddy comes home. Children seem to be picking up their surrounding language just as well, especially with the long schooling days in Korea, so I wouldn't worry about my kid not speaking Korean. Many mixed-race children of Korean mothers seem to have the problem that it's their English, not their Korean that's lacking and they can never achieve true bilinguality. If both parents make an effort to make their child bilingual, however, than both varieties should be able to succeed.

And as for the 'don't mix or your race will die out' argumet, yes, I've heard it. A lot, actually. It's just as extreme among some white elitist circles, the (official) reasons for which are the fact that white genes are all recessive, the fact that other people are having more babies than white people and the aspect that white women in child-bearing age make up only 2% of the world's population. It makes sense, too. It seems very likely to me that most Caucasian features COULD (I say could because there are scientists who believe otherwise) completely vanish from the earth a few hundred years from now. Yet I would actually prefer marrying a non-white man, though I'm not trying to rule them out completely either. And I am no self-hating person either, but proud to be white. I love my blonde hair and I like blue eyes in other people. So what makes me so blatantly go out with non-white men and consider having children with them?

It's because I don't believe in the importance of any individual race, but rather in the importance of equality. I don't want to let any such abstract idea as 'race' dictate my life and I firmly believe that my happiness is more important than any genetic make-ups. I will marry whoever I want and will produce children of whatever race they happen to be. I know I will love my children to death, be they white, black, yellow or red, have they two feet or 1 or 3, be they as beautiful as a model or as ugly as the Hunchback of Notre Dame. Race is a rather unnecessary factor to divide people by when nobody knows the outcome. Who says any future breed of Korean won't be better-looking than the current Koreans? Looking at Daniel Henney, this idea doesn't seem so abstract. Granted, there is just as big a chance that the Korean people of the future will be less attractive than the current ones, but even if that is so, I think it's a good price to pay for helping to eradicate xenophobia, making race less important and making Korea more multi-cultural as Britain or the US are, making mixed children more accepted and all those good things, regardles of the relative attractiveness of the 'new' Koreans (though here I'd like to add that I read a study just a few weeks ago in the process of which pictures of white, Japanese and mixed white-Japanese babies were shown to a group of adult Japanese and white people. The mixed babies were deemed the most attractive by both groups. Again, this is not to say that if Korea mixed more, the population MUST look better than now, just that it seems likely and even if not... well, I've been there.) Therefore, even at the price of uniquely Korean features, I am cheering for every single interracial couple that lives in Korea.

I respect any Koreans who wish to reserve both the cultural and racial identity (if they don't come across as extremely racist as some do). It's, after all, their personal happiness they may or not be sacrificing for this cause, not mine. I realise that all of the above is just my opinion, but I believe it's an opinion that's shared by many people and will continue to be shared by more and more people as time goes by. Young Koreans today are very different from the Koreans 50 years ago. They date at a young age, they have sex at a younger age, they caress each other on the elevator (in a country where public displays of affection are a cultural no-no), they set up online-portals to meet each other, they are interested in foreigners and they are also attracted to them. I watch a lot of Korean TV and there are several TV shows dedicated to interaction with foreigners - such as 'Chatterbox of Beauties' starring 16 foreign women, many of whom white, talking about how much they love Korean culture and most importantly, men. I frequently see white women on MTV or on porn channels in passing. Not that any of the portrayals are particularly respectful - after all, most of them just stroke the Korean male's ego and stimulate their curiousity to 'try' a foreigner. But they are still there, have a media presence, and that alone is positive and a sign. Korean men also have a special interest in Japanese women due to their reputation of being 'easier', calmer, nicer and more open than Korean women. All of these things were unheard of just 50 years ago. Korea will doubtlessly always be more homogenous than other countries due to their strong cultural identity, and they will likely not be as multi-cultural as, say, Britain for a long time, maybe not ever. Korea was founded by people who refused to mix with their Chinese, Mongolian or Japanese invaders in an attempt to keep their culture unique among Asian countries, lending to the popular Korean believe that even just dating a Japanese or a Chinese is 'interracial'. The Koreans have a strong sense of who they are, and are unashamed of their nationalistc side, much moreso than we and many other countries currently are. Their nationalistic side was a shock to me at first, for I live in a country whose notions of nationalism have been labelled as evil and immoral by ourself and the winning states of WW II and the idea of all nationalism being evil is widespread among my people. Koreans will probably continue to be a little harder to marry than other races for many more years to come. Many Koreans don't believe that any non-Korean can grasp Korean culture, not to mention such unique features as han, jung or nanchii.

But despite all these barriers, globalization is a much stronger force which can't and won't be stopped and has already been successful in shaping the ideas of young Koreans. The Koreans who are young now will grow up shaped by foreign tastes and influences, many of whom well-travelled, even more of whom with experiences from abroad. They will grow up to shape a more open and more liberal country and I don't think that even mixed children will face any more discrimination than fat children or the socially awkward, hygienically challenged ones in a conservative estimate of 10 years from now and be fully and completely accepted in maybe 20 or 30 years from now. Maybe even sooner, unless something unexpected comes in the way (North Korea...). But yeah - I don't fear for my or my children's future happiness by dating my boyfriend, at all. By sticking to my beliefs and by trying to be as culturally sensitive as possible, I will find my happiness. I'm sure of it.

Okay, and this was my NOVEL for the day!!!! :lol

Edit to the novel of the day as something came to me as I was talking to my boyfriend earlier: He pointed out to me that Korean schoolkids, like kids all over the world, try to pick on the kids who are the weakest. Most obviously, those would be the kids with the hearing impairment, the ugly kids, the fat kids, the socially awkward kids with no friends and yes, the mixed-race kids, too. But he believes that the personality of the child would play a HUGE factor in dedicating its success in Korean schools, and I'd have to agree as I reminded myself of the school queen in my middle school. The most influential girl at my middle school was also the fattest and ugliest of my school - in a nutshell, perfect bully material. However, what made her triumph over the others was her confidence, getting all the bloodthirsty kids to respect her enough never to bully her. She was strong and projected such an image - I believe that strong and confident children are a lot less likely to get bullied, regardless of whether they make perfect bully material in any other aspect.
Last edited by Néa Vanille on Dec 27th, '06, 23:32, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
onoturtle
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 154
Joined: Jun 28th, '04, 04:20
Location: Hawaii

Post by onoturtle » Dec 27th, '06, 23:12

Whoa some long posts here... On a less serious note, do any guys want a Korean girlfriend??? From my personal experience with Korean international students (hmm, I guess I don't really know too many Korean-Americans), I don't think I could AFFORD one. I'm sorry I don't drive a Mercedes Benz! :'( I think they've watched a little too many Korean dramas. Oh, and let's not mention their mothers. Based on what they say about their mothers, I don't think I'd want to meet them!

Maybe it's because they're young. Maybe with age they float back to reality. Or maybe then I'd be out of school and have $$. Maybe. Till then, they're just friends :)

EDIT: I live in Hawaii. So I'm used to seeing a variety of cultures. And it's not so odd to see ethnically mixed people. And actually, other than the international students, I can't really think of any Koreans I know that aren't mixed with something else. So as far as kids getting bullied, it has nothing to do with ethnicity around here. I got bullied when I was young because I was the shy kid, not because I was Filipino, which was probably the ethnicity of a big chunk of the school population.

My family slightly encourages dating white girls. But that's for genetic reasons (our family has some not so good recessive genes), they want to see happy, healthy children. Encourage, but not force. We can't help who we fall in love with, after all.
Image

User avatar
groink
Posts: 2039
Joined: Dec 8th, '03, 03:58
Location: Pearl City, Hawaii

Post by groink » Dec 27th, '06, 23:39

Néa Vanille wrote:Edit to the novel of the day as something came to me as I was talking to my boyfriend earlier: He pointed out to me that Korean schoolkids, like kids all over the world, try to pick on the kids who are the weakest. Most obviously, those would be the kids with the hearing impairment, the ugly kids, the fat kids, the socially awkward kids with no friends and yes, the mixed-race kids, too.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hines_Ward

Following info is from HBO's Inside the NFL I watched a few days ago. Hines Ward is the quarterback of the Pittsburgh Steelers. He earned the most recent NFL Super Bowl's MVP award.

The reason I bring this up is that Hines is also half Korean (father is African-American.) According to the interview, his mother took Hines out of South Korea and sent him to the US when he was about one month old. Mother's reason: she felt he would be picked on by the Korean children at school. Hines mentioned that he can't comprehend how multiracial children can be brought up and educated under those kinds of conditions. At the schools, the abuse is very brutal - both physically and emotionally. And even today, this type of treatment by the other kids is prevalent. Which is why Hines recently set up a foundation in South Korea to help these multiracial children.

South Korea is now declaring Hines Ward as their son, according to the interview. Hines didn't exactly say the following word-for-word, but he did mention in a roundabout way that Korea is only NOW paying attention to him since his Super Bowl and MVP win, i.e. where were they BEFORE the win?

--- groink

User avatar
ianwarren
Posts: 21
Joined: Jul 31st, '05, 12:02
Location: Wolverhampton - England

Post by ianwarren » Dec 27th, '06, 23:49

if anybody is interested in an "I want an English Boyfriend" with a picture of me on it giving a thumbs up... I can knock one up on cafepress in five minutes :D

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 28th, '06, 00:01

Obviously, being mixed with black makes things a LOT more complicated for the kid as children of black people, and even black people in general are a lot less respected in Korea. Koreans for the most part differ between different kinds of foreigners, with white and Japanese being the most respected (for their high income) and black people along with South Asians enjoying the least positive reputation. It's the sad truth that even many Korean who were open to me had a very negative opinion on black people. There was actually an incident just a few weeks ago when the only black woman on the talk-show I mentioned (with the foreign women talking about how much they like Korea) was also the first to face racism via some Korean guy doing a jungle dance. I don't know much about Japan, so feel free to correct me, but it always seemed to me like they were a lot more attracted to black culture and people and a lot more accepting to them, at least in comparison to Korea.

Koreans as a whole seem to be rather image-oriented and status-conscious. People from rich countries they like (sometimes) and occassionally admire for their money and English-speaking ability, people from poor countries they don't so much. Regardless of the fact that there are millions of black Americans who speak perfect English, black people are associated with poverty and all things not desirable, whereas all white people are immediately taken as Americans, regardless of the fact that there are millions of Germans or Russian who may not speak a word of English. Of course this isn't true for every single Korean, but I'd say it is for the general public. Hey, I never said they didn't have a long way to go - the West is definitely still a better place for children to grow up. If you believe Koreans, who for some reason are very sceptical of their own school system, then that is true even for their own, pure-bred children.

I just finished reading a thread over on eslcafe, where people with actual biracial kids post. Opinions are mixed, many are very happy and some are less so. Some mention that they feel that their children are isolated, some claim the opposite. Few, though, mention excessive bullying. But then, the posters there all have 'good' families in the sense that the parents are still together and looking after their child like in any good, intact family, whereas quite a few of the biracial kids in Korea are raised by single moms; their parental background with lack of masculine support would make them weaker against mean kids at school. Many biracial children in the past were the result of American GIs with Korean sex workers - those kinds of children would run the risk of bullying even if the American GI in question had been Korean-American, as good family background is extremely important in Korea as well. Most posters leave Korea when the child is of school-age because many liberal Westerners won't put up with the corporal punishment still in practice in Korean schools and because Korean schools are thought of as too drill-oriented.

Obviously, eslcafe.com isn't a good representation of all children of Korea, as the posters all have the same story and few have their children in high school, but I thought it was an interesting read. Since I believe most of the posters, I'd say that acceptance would vary a lot and depend on a lot of factors, but could have either outcome. Given the choice, though, the US does seem imcomparably more attractive.

AznZero
Posts: 12
Joined: Apr 18th, '05, 05:43

Post by AznZero » Dec 28th, '06, 00:58

hines ward is a wide receiver he has skillz of a quarterback

User avatar
PJB
Posts: 184
Joined: Apr 1st, '05, 13:14
Location: Seoul

Post by PJB » Dec 28th, '06, 09:39

Néa Vanille wrote:Given the choice, though, the US does seem imcomparably more attractive.


Saying that though, the drill-oriented and strict punishment method is what stands between orderly children and unruly children. I'm not sure about how things are in the US, but the way I see it, the UK has always been a country that closely follows certain trends the US tends to set in motion. Those trends being more relaxed punishment methods and such - All of which are leading to quite possibly the biggest youth problems on the planet. Kids are slowly slipping out of control, with children turning to violence, drugs and sex at younger and younger ages. And let's not even get onto the discipline at schools. They are essentially allowed to run-riot, and now the teachers can't do anything about it - Because if they do touch them, move them, or force them in any way then the teacher will be the one who gets punished by the law.

I'm pretty sure, from sources I know in Korea, that the South Korean school system is vastly improved over that of 10 or 20 years ago. However, if it's improving in the right direction or not is something left to the future. Are all kids going to turn out like those in the UK? And like it not, the UK has some of the highest youth crime rates in the entire world.

Uuree34
Posts: 21
Joined: Dec 14th, '06, 05:03

Post by Uuree34 » Dec 28th, '06, 12:20

quote from Marvelous " But the Koreans who have their identiy intact will keep on marrying other Koreans... Most of the males are taught this at a young age."

I kind of agree, because we ( the restaurant that I work at) just hosted a big wedding on Saturday, and believe it or not, Korean guy, married a mix-racial woman, I don't really know where she is from, but I overheard someone saying two different racial mix. Then the Korean guy's parents and relatives were all wearing their traditional Korean dresses, at same time there are all these beautiful tall blonde girls and guys joined together with the most good looking Asians ( I kid you not, that I wished so much that I was invited to that wedding. I mean, of course not all them were good looking, but most of them were)
It was the most beatiful wedding we ever hosted.


On the other hand, one of my best friend is Chinese, and she has been in relationship with a Korean guy for five years. They are very close, and cute together, I always thought that one day they will get married. Once I asked her about marriage and how many kids she is planning to have? She said, oh over my future mother in law's dead body, she swore not let us get married, for as long as she lived. ( isn't it funny how she said, future mother in law? lol ) But surprisingly my friends are very much in love, and try not think about marriage subject. My friend hates it, especially when she goes to her BF's house, and his mom would not even greet her, but what can they do right? he is much older than my friend, and grown man. So I guess it all depends on the family.

I can understand, why it is different for guys than for girls. Any family would want their son to carry their blood line right? Even though it's an old fasioned thing, it still seems to be popular amongst Asian families.

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Dec 28th, '06, 15:46

PJB wrote:
Néa Vanille wrote:Given the choice, though, the US does seem imcomparably more attractive.


Saying that though, the drill-oriented and strict punishment method is what stands between orderly children and unruly children. I'm not sure about how things are in the US, but the way I see it, the UK has always been a country that closely follows certain trends the US tends to set in motion. Those trends being more relaxed punishment methods and such - All of which are leading to quite possibly the biggest youth problems on the planet. Kids are slowly slipping out of control, with children turning to violence, drugs and sex at younger and younger ages. And let's not even get onto the discipline at schools. They are essentially allowed to run-riot, and now the teachers can't do anything about it - Because if they do touch them, move them, or force them in any way then the teacher will be the one who gets punished by the law.

I'm pretty sure, from sources I know in Korea, that the South Korean school system is vastly improved over that of 10 or 20 years ago. However, if it's improving in the right direction or not is something left to the future. Are all kids going to turn out like those in the UK? And like it not, the UK has some of the highest youth crime rates in the entire world.


I very much agree with you. Though the Korean school system has tons of problems that prevent it from being a truly great environment for young people (such as the fact that Korean people are prevented from having much of a personality until they enter University because they simply don't have the free-time to develop, the immense pressure on performing well and bring honour to the family academically, the fact that frustrated Korean kids beat each other up a lot, high suicide rates etc.), it is true that our Western schools have their own set of problems to deal with. Teenage pregnancy, shoot-outs, spread of STDs, violence, brutality, kids not knowing what to do with their time, disrespecting teachers etc. - I have yet to see a school system ANYWHERE in the world that seemed even close to flawless. However, I have to say that I was quite pleased with my high school here in Germany. I attented a high school for linguistically gifted students, so all my classmates were intelligent and never gave me a hard time for being an Asiaphile dork XD. I had TONS of free time and as a result, am much more mature and experienced than most Koreans at my age. I was just lucky, though, since there are enough schools in Germany in which students encounter a variety of problems and though I had nothing to complain about as far as classmates went, I was very displeased with my curriculum.

However, I still think that, for NOW, a good school with a fine reputation and a low crime rate in a multicultural city such as New York or Berlin would still be a much better environment for a biracial child, especially if it was mixed with black or South Asian, unless it was confident enough to make its way or it expressed the wish to stay there. Even if it wasn't bullied, it seems to me like a good school in a multicultural part of the world, where it would get to know a wide variety of people and races, would help make a child with roots from 2 different parts of the world more worldier and connect a little more with its non-Korean roots. None of my half-Korean friends who went to school in Germany ever faced any discrimination to speak of, either. Though Korean schools are better in some aspects, the overall fact that the country is still so isolated (now) is enough to make me think that a child can only benefit from experiences abroad. But then I don't really know what either country will be like 10 years from now (which is when I, personally, will probably come around to having kids), so everything I say is purely hypothetical. Korea is changing very fast indeed, so it might very well be just as good a place for biracial kids to go to school in a few years from now.


By the, PJB, I still haven't quite figured out what ethnicity you are. What is it, if you don't mind me asking? BBC? :lol

User avatar
PJB
Posts: 184
Joined: Apr 1st, '05, 13:14
Location: Seoul

Post by PJB » Dec 28th, '06, 19:20

British Born Chinese? :D

Haha, I am English/Danish. With some other mixes in the bloodline that extend to somewhere in the east (never found out the family secret yet though).

aa
Posts: 31
Joined: Feb 16th, '04, 20:29

Post by aa » Jan 2nd, '07, 03:12

LOL This thread is still going strong. -- wow and the last couple pages were quite interesting to read esp, the comments by kimja805 and PJB's response and Nea's comments.

User avatar
woo_kmk
Posts: 7
Joined: Dec 27th, '06, 06:41
Location: Washington

Post by woo_kmk » Jan 2nd, '07, 03:19

i dunno about you this t shirt is better

http://www.bustedtees.com/shirt/southkorea/male

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Jan 2nd, '07, 04:07

PJB wrote:British Born Chinese? :D

Haha, I am English/Danish. With some other mixes in the bloodline that extend to somewhere in the east (never found out the family secret yet though).


Ah. I thought you were Chinese mainly because I read in another thread that your parents would be unwilling to accept a Japanese girl as your gf and I've only ever heard of that from Chinese guys and never from white ones. In fact, I've never talked to a European person who told me that his or her parents wouldn't allow him or her to date whoever they wanted. Obviously, I haven't talked to enough white people. Guess in white society it's just more hush-hush about not dating the foreigner.
Last edited by Néa Vanille on Jan 2nd, '07, 04:46, edited 1 time in total.

Carbon Dixoide
Posts: 15
Joined: Nov 11th, '06, 22:22
Location: Canada

...

Post by Carbon Dixoide » Jan 2nd, '07, 04:26

lol same here ... well I AM chinese... but parents won't let me do anything w/ japanese... since of history and such... makes everything so much harder... they're like y r u watching jap drama and listening to jap music.. ?!!?!?! so yeah... and ...er.. this thread is about korean girls/guys? lol well i think korean and jap guys get mad realli easily... like furious... and like a week ago i saw some korean guy like pushing his g/f cause they're arguing or w/e.. and it's like on the street ...w/ lots of cars and ppl ... scary o.O ...

o and koran girls r cute... well the ones that r not sluts...

Alveric
Posts: 9
Joined: Jan 21st, '05, 12:01

Post by Alveric » Jan 2nd, '07, 07:07

PJB wrote:Kimja, what you just described, is a process that countries like the United Kingdom began to go through 50-100 years ago. Even down to the teasing of kids that different. It's the "teething" troubles of an emerging global society. Even today the UK has the exaxt problems as you described in Korea, with seperation of cultures and such things. But there is light at the end of the tunnel, and hope for a brighter future. Korea will change over time, as change is inevitable. I've always seen Korea as socially similar to the UK of the past (step back in time and you see how similar the social system in UK used to be) and possibly other countries.

But think of this. Many thousands of years ago, we all came from the same place. We're all distantly related, and one day, we'll all return to the same place as our cultures begin to merge. It's a sad thing that unique identify may eventually fade, but that won't happen for a long time, assuming the world is here to support us. As time passes, civilisations rise and fall beneath the sand due to war, environment and global change. One day we'll all have to rely on each other to survive on this planet, so these small steps towards turning into a global village are a step not only in the right direction, but also the direction we need to take inorder to survive.



MAN, I LOVE YOUR POST!
It's not only in very homogeneous societies that these kind of things happen, but it will all change for the better since we're all HUMANS before WE'RE KOREAN or JAPANESE or AMERICAN or whatever. Isolated cultures and ethnic pride will eventually be eliminated IMO. It's just not practical enough, and nobody rules over the heart.

I did a little experiment with my family over these topics (I'm a 23yrs old, big-eyed, dark skinned Latin American will all sorts of blood in me [OK, most likely Spanish and Native American in my case, BUT my case is very simple compared to most of my friends]) and I asked all of them (aunts, cousins, everyone, [think of family gatherings in Latin America like A WHOLE CLAN ]) :P what they thought about me having an Asian girlfriend. To my VERY HUGE SURPRISE some of my aunts said:

Aunt A: WHAT, YOU CANT DO THAT! THEY DO NOT UNDERSTAND OUR VALUES

Dad to Aunt A: What are you talking about, they respect family ties, like we do! Besides, I would like to have a Chinese daughter-in-law, I like mixed children.

Aunt B: NONO, THAT CANT BE, You have to marry a Latin American girl

Me: WHY? DONT TELL ME IT'S RACE BECAUSE THAT'S NOT POSSIBLE HERE!

Aunt C: I dont see a problem with that.

Cousin A (male): Hey, that sounds good.

Aunt B (to me): It's not race, ITS THE CULTURE. Its completely different. "WE" could never understand them completely (notice my qmarks on the we, as if she's the one getting married, my God!)

Cousin B (female): Well, I dont seem to see the problem myself...

MOM: OK, leave my son alone, he can marry anyone he likes!

...End of Discussion...

(This was ALL IN A VERY LIVELY SPANISH, I hope I remembered right)

In conclusion, IMO even if you belong to a very heterogeneous all race society like Latin America, more SUBTLE things (values, cross-cultural communication, communication among the families of each person [please refer to the "WE" above] ) and some NOT SO SUBTLE (mainly language) would still get in the way. Race IS ONLY THE OUTSIDE and the very beginning I have to sadly say... heck! you cant get more superficial than SKIN. But young people all over the world are changing their views on these topics... hopefully for the better...

P.S.: A very cute Chinese girl back in High school told me at the same time HOW SHE REALLY LIKED ME (I was on cloud nine) BUT HOW IT COULDN'T BE BECAUSE OF HER FAMILY(I then moved to the seventh hell), and I think IT WAS THE FIRST TIME EVER I thought about these things like families and cultures and countries over men and women and love... Incredible isn't it?
Q: Is Religion within Love or Love within Religion?
A: LOVE IS THE ONLY RELIGION.

User avatar
xbabygmonsterx
Posts: 28
Joined: Dec 30th, '06, 04:59
Location: Modesto, CALI

Post by xbabygmonsterx » Jan 4th, '07, 03:37

hey wanna hear something kinda tunny?
I'M KOREAN AND I'VE NEVER DATED A KOREAN GUY BEFORE IN MY LIFE!
agj wghliw gl glawg
haha yeah
EVERY single Korean guy I've liked, crushed on, OR EVEN KNOWN has the biggest ego in the world that I want to just CRUSH (I know... sounds like I need anger management huh? LOL it's true though I swear lol!)
they're all so ****, stuck up, AND BREAK UP WITH WHOEVER THEY'RE GOING OUT WITH after like.. a freaking week. like oh my gooooooodness hahaha how can you be so shallow. a week ago you're like oh she's so perfect and then a week later, it's like. oh. I don't like her anymore -_-;;
I never understood that
well anyway
A LOT of Korean guys I know are seriously traditional and want to marry only Koreans. em. I wanted that too for a really long time until everyone around me kept getting rejected by like every single Korean guy around -_- maybe it was just a huge coincidence lol. but anyway. just stating my opinion :) I don't like Korean guys (beyond friendship) haha :)
from FRIENDSHIP

[A] friend is a sane man who exercises not my ingenuity but me. My friend gives me entertainment without requiring me to soop or to lisp, or to mask myself

--Ralph Waldo Emerson

User avatar
xbabygmonsterx
Posts: 28
Joined: Dec 30th, '06, 04:59
Location: Modesto, CALI

Post by xbabygmonsterx » Jan 4th, '07, 03:43

oh yes, adding on to what I said earlier...
I'm full blooded Korean and I have a 3/4 Cambodian 1/4 Chinese mix boyfriend.
We've been dating for 2 years now and guess what... my parents dislike him. ;;
when they tell me how he isn't worth it, a lot of the times it seems like it's because he's not Korean. or rather just because they don't like Cambodians or something. soooooooooooooooooo
my view: Korean parents are frikkin racist and deserve to have their stubborn eyes opened
mm.. yeah where was I
anyway
goodluck finding a good Korean boyfriend. :)
from FRIENDSHIP

[A] friend is a sane man who exercises not my ingenuity but me. My friend gives me entertainment without requiring me to soop or to lisp, or to mask myself

--Ralph Waldo Emerson

User avatar
o2_krn
Posts: 4
Joined: Jan 5th, '07, 04:14
Location: Burnaby

Post by o2_krn » Jan 5th, '07, 04:35

it really depends, some parents are easy going allowing there kids to love who ever they want. i was born in korea but now im here in canada. its very cold and windy at this time i must say.. but yeah some parents are strict and would like to respect there family by dating there own kind. but others see things differently and it doesnt matter to them who their children marry. but thats rare to see. my cousins are korean/chinese. and some of my friends are korean/canadian so far thats all i know that are mixed in my area that i live in. i myself only dated a few korean girls , the rest i dated was taiwanese. go to korea! its better luck there lol =D

~penelope~
Posts: 29
Joined: Jan 5th, '07, 05:00

Post by ~penelope~ » Jan 5th, '07, 05:27

i had one before too. lol
but wouldnt mind another!!

amabelle
Posts: 29
Joined: Oct 6th, '06, 02:16

Post by amabelle » Jan 5th, '07, 05:39

o2_krn wrote:it really depends, some parents are easy going allowing there kids to love who ever they want. i was born in korea but now im here in canada. its very cold and windy at this time i must say.. but yeah some parents are strict and would like to respect there family by dating there own kind. but others see things differently and it doesnt matter to them who their children marry. but thats rare to see. my cousins are korean/chinese. and some of my friends are korean/canadian so far thats all i know that are mixed in my area that i live in. i myself only dated a few korean girls , the rest i dated was taiwanese. go to korea! its better luck there lol =D


hi! you are a korean male who is single? wanna be my boyfriend? hahahahaha.

i want a KDrama bf. =)
fine fine. a Korean bf.
still dreaming. for my Seoulmate.

thefinalword
Posts: 28
Joined: Nov 25th, '06, 02:07

Post by thefinalword » Jan 5th, '07, 05:41

thats what my gf calls me now, her korean bf even though Im filipino haha.
cuz 90% of stuff I watch is kdramas... i dont watch tv LOL

amabelle
Posts: 29
Joined: Oct 6th, '06, 02:16

Post by amabelle » Jan 5th, '07, 05:55

thefinalword wrote:thats what my gf calls me now, her korean bf even though Im filipino haha.
cuz 90% of stuff I watch is kdramas... i dont watch tv LOL



hi! you're a filipino male who watches kdramas?
wow. thats awesome! are you in the philippines?
im uber impressed.
and your gf is super smart.
imma find a bf and just call him my korean bf.
seems easier and more realistic. =)

jho
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 62
Joined: Oct 24th, '05, 20:46

Post by jho » Jan 5th, '07, 05:55

I have a Korean boyfriend :) He's really kind to me.. <3

User avatar
o2_krn
Posts: 4
Joined: Jan 5th, '07, 04:14
Location: Burnaby

Post by o2_krn » Jan 5th, '07, 18:43

amabelle wrote:
o2_krn wrote:it really depends, some parents are easy going allowing there kids to love who ever they want. i was born in korea but now im here in canada. its very cold and windy at this time i must say.. but yeah some parents are strict and would like to respect there family by dating there own kind. but others see things differently and it doesnt matter to them who their children marry. but thats rare to see. my cousins are korean/chinese. and some of my friends are korean/canadian so far thats all i know that are mixed in my area that i live in. i myself only dated a few korean girls , the rest i dated was taiwanese. go to korea! its better luck there lol =D


hi! you are a korean male who is single? wanna be my boyfriend? hahahahaha.

i want a KDrama bf. =)
fine fine. a Korean bf.
still dreaming. for my Seoulmate.



lol i'll that as a complement =S?? lol i am single. but im ugly >=D =P lmao

i think easiest way to get some korean parents to be okay with you is if you know at least some korean culture because it will help you out that atleast you know something about the culture to relate. my last ex she was taiwanese, personally my mom agree's with who ever i date aslong as i love them but i tought her some korean things and it made her feel easy when my mom wanted to meet her. lol it was a funny moment, wow that was the good days.
Image

thefinalword
Posts: 28
Joined: Nov 25th, '06, 02:07

Post by thefinalword » Jan 5th, '07, 18:48

amabelle wrote:
thefinalword wrote:thats what my gf calls me now, her korean bf even though Im filipino haha.
cuz 90% of stuff I watch is kdramas... i dont watch tv LOL



hi! you're a filipino male who watches kdramas?
wow. thats awesome! are you in the philippines?
im uber impressed.
and your gf is super smart.
imma find a bf and just call him my korean bf.
seems easier and more realistic. =)


haha I don't live in the philippines, I'm from southern california.
wow, now Im starting to feel weird. Is it weird that I enjoy watching dramas?
haha, Im not a big fan of tv except for Heroes and smallville ( guess there's a pattern )
I just like the acting in korean dramas, i think it's better.
but that's just me.

sugarcane
Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 11th, '06, 13:25
Location: little red dot

Post by sugarcane » Jan 5th, '07, 22:40

Who doesnt want a korean boyfriend..even i want one..lol

Pekana
Posts: 53
Joined: Dec 22nd, '06, 01:18

Post by Pekana » Jan 6th, '07, 00:39

If the Korean guy in question would be kind, reliable, open-minded and with a good sense of humour then sure - I'd want a boyfriend like that.
But if I'd find a guy with those characteristics then I'd probably grab him and run far away from any meddling, no matter what his nationality would be. :lol

amabelle
Posts: 29
Joined: Oct 6th, '06, 02:16

Post by amabelle » Jan 6th, '07, 07:37

o2_krn wrote:
amabelle wrote:
o2_krn wrote:it really depends, some parents are easy going allowing there kids to love who ever they want. i was born in korea but now im here in canada. its very cold and windy at this time i must say.. but yeah some parents are strict and would like to respect there family by dating there own kind. but others see things differently and it doesnt matter to them who their children marry. but thats rare to see. my cousins are korean/chinese. and some of my friends are korean/canadian so far thats all i know that are mixed in my area that i live in. i myself only dated a few korean girls , the rest i dated was taiwanese. go to korea! its better luck there lol =D


hi! you are a korean male who is single? wanna be my boyfriend? hahahahaha.

i want a KDrama bf. =)
fine fine. a Korean bf.
still dreaming. for my Seoulmate.



lol i'll that as a complement =S?? lol i am single. but im ugly >=D =P lmao

i think easiest way to get some korean parents to be okay with you is if you know at least some korean culture because it will help you out that atleast you know something about the culture to relate. my last ex she was taiwanese, personally my mom agree's with who ever i date aslong as i love them but i tought her some korean things and it made her feel easy when my mom wanted to meet her. lol it was a funny moment, wow that was the good days.


oh no. i dont think there is a korean who is ugly.
all koreans are hot. =)
and now-a-days there's a shortage for girls who wants to be with a korean male.
but i have a question. what kind of hair do you have? long or short?
a korean with sexy hair. yep yep. that's asking for too much..?

ps. call your ex. "follow your heart. be happy." by what's up fox.

amabelle
Posts: 29
Joined: Oct 6th, '06, 02:16

Post by amabelle » Jan 6th, '07, 07:44

thefinalword wrote:
amabelle wrote:
thefinalword wrote:thats what my gf calls me now, her korean bf even though Im filipino haha.
cuz 90% of stuff I watch is kdramas... i dont watch tv LOL



hi! you're a filipino male who watches kdramas?
wow. thats awesome! are you in the philippines?
im uber impressed.
and your gf is super smart.
imma find a bf and just call him my korean bf.
seems easier and more realistic. =)


haha I don't live in the philippines, I'm from southern california.
wow, now Im starting to feel weird. Is it weird that I enjoy watching dramas?
haha, Im not a big fan of tv except for Heroes and smallville ( guess there's a pattern )
I just like the acting in korean dramas, i think it's better.
but that's just me.


noo! thats a compliment! dont feel wierd.
seee. i know i cant get a korean bf, so the next best thing is to have a bf who can watch the kdrama with me.
you are one in a million, buddy.

and you are right. the acting in korean dramas are wayy better. have you seen the stuff in tfc or gma?

User avatar
Néa Vanille
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 780
Joined: Mar 26th, '05, 08:35
Location: Seoul, South Korea (whooooza!)

Post by Néa Vanille » Jan 6th, '07, 07:45

amabelle wrote:oh no. i dont think there is a korean who is ugly.
all koreans are hot. =)


I wasn't going to say anything but that's just too funny. :lol :lol :lol

Take it from someone who's actually lived in Korea and has many Korean guy friends that PLENTY of Korean guys are ugly, stupid, violent, disrespectful, traditional, thuggish or any combination thereof. :lol When I was in Korea, plenty of middle-aged Korean guys ogled my chest and asked me whether I was a prostitute and how much I cost - in the middle of the day, in such public places as subway stations! :lol And no, I wasn't wearing anything revealing that would justify such a question. There were also enough who were short or fat, had bad teeth or bad skin etc. etc.

They are pretty attractive on average, though.

prinsezha
Posts: 81
Joined: Jan 2nd, '07, 18:51
Location: dubai , U.A.E

Post by prinsezha » Jan 6th, '07, 14:09

thefinalword wrote:thats what my gf calls me now, her korean bf even though Im filipino haha.
cuz 90% of stuff I watch is kdramas... i dont watch tv LOL
hi..uuyy pinoy ka?(hi ur a filipino?..)..goodluck with your gf!..nice to see someone who is filipino here..
SoMeDaY a SiMpLe GiRl LiKe Me WiLl Be ReMeMbEReD...aNd WiLl LeAve A ReMarKaBlE FoOtPrInT In ThIs EaRtH
:mrgreen: BASYHA!!!

User avatar
o2_krn
Posts: 4
Joined: Jan 5th, '07, 04:14
Location: Burnaby

Post by o2_krn » Jan 6th, '07, 17:05

amabelle wrote:
o2_krn wrote:
amabelle wrote:
o2_krn wrote:it really depends, some parents are easy going allowing there kids to love who ever they want. i was born in korea but now im here in canada. its very cold and windy at this time i must say.. but yeah some parents are strict and would like to respect there family by dating there own kind. but others see things differently and it doesnt matter to them who their children marry. but thats rare to see. my cousins are korean/chinese. and some of my friends are korean/canadian so far thats all i know that are mixed in my area that i live in. i myself only dated a few korean girls , the rest i dated was taiwanese. go to korea! its better luck there lol =D


hi! you are a korean male who is single? wanna be my boyfriend? hahahahaha.

i want a KDrama bf. =)
fine fine. a Korean bf.
still dreaming. for my Seoulmate.



lol i'll that as a complement =S?? lol i am single. but im ugly >=D =P lmao

i think easiest way to get some korean parents to be okay with you is if you know at least some korean culture because it will help you out that atleast you know something about the culture to relate. my last ex she was taiwanese, personally my mom agree's with who ever i date aslong as i love them but i tought her some korean things and it made her feel easy when my mom wanted to meet her. lol it was a funny moment, wow that was the good days.


oh no. i dont think there is a korean who is ugly.
all koreans are hot. =)
and now-a-days there's a shortage for girls who wants to be with a korean male.
but i have a question. what kind of hair do you have? long or short?
a korean with sexy hair. yep yep. that's asking for too much..?

ps. call your ex. "follow your heart. be happy." by what's up fox.



lol my hair is typical korean thats all i can say lol. and no i dont wanna go back to my past i hate doing that i've moved on and wanna meet someone new. maybe ill show u a pic =S lol.
Image

thefinalword
Posts: 28
Joined: Nov 25th, '06, 02:07

Post by thefinalword » Jan 6th, '07, 18:06

amabelle wrote:
thefinalword wrote:
amabelle wrote:
thefinalword wrote:thats what my gf calls me now, her korean bf even though Im filipino haha.
cuz 90% of stuff I watch is kdramas... i dont watch tv LOL



hi! you're a filipino male who watches kdramas?
wow. thats awesome! are you in the philippines?
im uber impressed.
and your gf is super smart.
imma find a bf and just call him my korean bf.
seems easier and more realistic. =)


haha I don't live in the philippines, I'm from southern california.
wow, now Im starting to feel weird. Is it weird that I enjoy watching dramas?
haha, Im not a big fan of tv except for Heroes and smallville ( guess there's a pattern )
I just like the acting in korean dramas, i think it's better.
but that's just me.


noo! thats a compliment! dont feel wierd.
seee. i know i cant get a korean bf, so the next best thing is to have a bf who can watch the kdrama with me.
you are one in a million, buddy.

and you are right. the acting in korean dramas are wayy better. have you seen the stuff in tfc or gma?


one in a million :D
i thought there was more like me, now I do feel uber awkward
lol yah. I'm not a big fan of TFC... gma isn't too bad. But TFC is so over the top with them trying so hard to be western.... it's like a mix match between the old and the new.
Pardon my french, but i found it annoying at times. but dont get me wrong I <3 my culture, i just think TFC is annoying haha.

my gf is trying to get me to watch "Kung Sino K maan", excuse me if i butchered the spelling. She said that's REALLY good.

maybe soon. :lol

User avatar
strawberricjam
Posts: 34
Joined: May 7th, '06, 04:18

Post by strawberricjam » Jan 6th, '07, 18:21

ohh i never thought korean guys where cute or anything until i like saw goong and full house, and SUPER JUNIOR..now i want to date a korean guy..but too bad i haven't met a cute one yet..~T__T

baoi
Posts: 24
Joined: Feb 16th, '05, 08:20

Post by baoi » Jan 6th, '07, 18:23

oih wow.. just read the first two pages..

interesting thread, although someone said that it was annoying.

ANiways, i always dreamed of a Koprean BF..
But i have the HIGHEST Expectations and stuff..
no one can ever meet them.. darnit!

rainbow_snakes
Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 14th, '06, 14:30
Location: united Kingdom

Post by rainbow_snakes » Jan 6th, '07, 18:44

i seriously didn't even think korean guys existed until i accidently cane across a picture of DBSK on the internet and immediately fell in love with them! now i'm really really really interested in korean stuff! especially the guys!!! ( ^. ^ )

krazyem
Posts: 10
Joined: Oct 18th, '06, 01:55

Post by krazyem » Jan 6th, '07, 18:46

wow...i totally agree with amabelle and thefinalword....korean acting is much better than what is offered here in north america.

*sigh* and i also agree that getting a korean bf is probably next to impossible for me here in canada so i would also settle for a guy who would watch k-dramas and any other fun asian stuff that i like with me.

amabelle
Posts: 29
Joined: Oct 6th, '06, 02:16

Post by amabelle » Jan 6th, '07, 20:12

Néa Vanille wrote:
amabelle wrote:oh no. i dont think there is a korean who is ugly.
all koreans are hot. =)


I wasn't going to say anything but that's just too funny. :lol :lol :lol

Take it from someone who's actually lived in Korea and has many Korean guy friends that PLENTY of Korean guys are ugly, stupid, violent, disrespectful, traditional, thuggish or any combination thereof. :lol When I was in Korea, plenty of middle-aged Korean guys ogled my chest and asked me whether I was a prostitute and how much I cost - in the middle of the day, in such public places as subway stations! :lol And no, I wasn't wearing anything revealing that would justify such a question. There were also enough who were short or fat, had bad teeth or bad skin etc. etc.

They are pretty attractive on average, though.


ohhh. i guess i overgeneralized it. but then i've only seen and been exposed to the pretty side of korea. =) i will see for myself this summer.
im sorry about guys doing that to you. ayy. i dont know what to say. that bothers me.

amabelle
Posts: 29
Joined: Oct 6th, '06, 02:16

Post by amabelle » Jan 7th, '07, 06:57

thefinalword wrote:one in a million :D
i thought there was more like me, now I do feel uber awkward
lol yah. I'm not a big fan of TFC... gma isn't too bad. But TFC is so over the top with them trying so hard to be western.... it's like a mix match between the old and the new.
Pardon my french, but i found it annoying at times. but dont get me wrong I <3 my culture, i just think TFC is annoying haha.

my gf is trying to get me to watch "Kung Sino K maan", excuse me if i butchered the spelling. She said that's REALLY good.

maybe soon. :lol


yes watch that. it can be just as good as korean dramas. =)
i think they made it better to show it to other countries as well.

User avatar
Wwaldo37
Posts: 207
Joined: Oct 8th, '04, 19:55

Post by Wwaldo37 » Jan 7th, '07, 07:38

LOL thefinalword YOU TOO!
All I watch are K-Dramas the occasional J-Drama and less frequently anime AND "Smallvill", "Heroes" and maybe Dr. Who (but thats British; and its downloaded ;p ) Edit: Ohh and "Battlestar Galactica"

I didn't read all the pages but did anyone post "I wan't a Korean Girl Friend!"

I think my 2nd or 3rd GF was Korean... I blame her for any asian "thing" I may have ;p
She was RICH and aggressive :D

I Noticed that page 1 was entirely female posters and pg2 mostly male.
I do feel kind of odd seeing my name beside this title btw. :P GF Dammit!

User avatar
annthizzle
Posts: 40
Joined: Jan 3rd, '07, 17:28
Location: cali

Post by annthizzle » Jan 7th, '07, 16:37

i met a korean guy but he wasnt all that great!!

User avatar
ctdidie
Posts: 13
Joined: Dec 30th, '06, 05:03
Location: Tokyo

Post by ctdidie » Jan 7th, '07, 17:03

lol, this topic is fun to read. i have only one thought. i think it applies to all kind of men. whoever you want, either he's from a very conservative nations or not, if he's an orphan, he's all yours when he's in love with you.

er.. im not saying that u girls should go and murder his family.. hehe

anyway, i dont want an asian(chinese, japanese n korean) bf at all. tho, they're nice to look and drool at XD

User avatar
annthizzle
Posts: 40
Joined: Jan 3rd, '07, 17:28
Location: cali

Post by annthizzle » Jan 7th, '07, 17:05

o0o i do cuhx iym already dating a viet guy!!

WeNwEn426
Posts: 11
Joined: Nov 24th, '04, 08:40
Location: KaLi-US

Post by WeNwEn426 » Jan 8th, '07, 05:47

hahaha i was just looking around and I saw this thread titled "i want a korean bf!" i was like WOW that's totally me!!!!! :lol ive watched a lot of korean dramas and the korean language is like music to my ears! i wonder if korean guys are really romantic like the ones in the dramas :P ... :cheers:

thefinalword
Posts: 28
Joined: Nov 25th, '06, 02:07

Post by thefinalword » Jan 10th, '07, 19:36

my girlfriend doesn't like song hye gyo....

but that's only because I talk about song more than my gf lol hahahaha

maddy_x3
Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 10th, '07, 08:15

Post by maddy_x3 » Jan 10th, '07, 21:06

in my last year of high school there were a bunch of new korean students.. like i don't even know where they came from they jsut suddenly appeared.

my friend and i were standing in line to get some food and they were standing in another line next to us and i guess they were trying to be cute and started pushing each other and causing a scene. it was SO ANNOYING! they weren't even that cute either

now i'm in college and there are a bunch of korean and even japanese exchange students.. they're all really cute (:p) but they kind of keep to themselves and don't generally talk to people outside of their circle.. it's sad really b/c i think the whole point of being an exchange student is to absorb the culture.

anyway, i want a korean boyfriend too but i've come to realize that they're just like guys here in america but less inclined to mingle with others not of their culture.

shame really..

User avatar
marvelous
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 145
Joined: Jan 20th, '06, 23:28
Location: PLANET K

Post by marvelous » Jan 11th, '07, 03:09

Koreans rock you... :salut:

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests