Translations in Japanese

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Sakado
Posts: 103
Joined: Feb 11th, '05, 06:16
Location: California

Translations in Japanese

Post by Sakado » Jun 27th, '06, 05:15

I've recently plunged into Yahoo Japan Auctions and have finally made my first purchase. What i have learned from it is that very few sellers sell overseas because
1. They might not speak english
2. Do not want to deal with international bank/money transfer
3. Just don't want to deal with foreigners.

Hoping that many sellers fall into #1 and #2, i'd like at least to persuade them to deal with foreigners...but since i don't know much japanese at all, i need your help guys/gals to translate sentences that i came up with after going through my first purchase.

Here it goes:

1. Would you consider selling it (or shipping) overseas?
2. I would pay using bank transfer and shipment would be done via EMS.
3. What is the address of the bank branch?
4. What is the SWIFT number?
5. Do you have any other bank account other than Japan Net Bank and E-Bank?
6. I would pay the shipping.
7. What is the manufacturing date?
8. What color is it?
9. Sorry for the delay.
10. Thank you. Great transaction and item in perfect condition.

ok, for now that's all i guess. If anyone has other tips on using YJA! or any other useful sentences, let me know.

Thanks in advance for your help! :cheers:

p.s. I know about deputy services, but would like to avoid them if possible.

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groink
Posts: 2023
Joined: Dec 8th, '03, 03:58
Location: Pearl City, Hawaii

Post by groink » Jun 27th, '06, 05:50

Reasons 1 and 2 are very legit. Despite you bending backwards for these sellers, #1 and #2 are still quite solid. The fact that you need things translated will make communications VERY difficult between you and seller. What if something's wrong with the item you received? You're going to have to deal with the non-English speaking seller. And none of the phrases you have listed will help you when you're arguing with the seller... Where's the insert booklet for my Momusu CD??? Why does the photobook smell like cigarette smoke? Stuff like that.

This is why deputy services are essential in transactions like these.

--- groink
1. Always read FAQs for a given forum before posting.
2. Read the first few posts in a topic before posting.
3. Speak using complete English words.
4. The Internet is international. Respect regional and cultural values.

Sakado
Posts: 103
Joined: Feb 11th, '05, 06:16
Location: California

Post by Sakado » Jun 27th, '06, 06:44

Thanks for responding, groink.

In my case, i'm only dealing with cell phones (ie sharp, toshiba), so the questions would be pretty much standards. As for translation, i use @nifty for translation and it goes give me a pretty good idea of the item i'm bidding on. My first purchase was actually a cell phone and even though the seller authorized oversea shipping, he did not write in english (just a few words), but using @nifty i could understand and reply by copying and pasting katakana words.

An example was when i was trying to make a bank transfer to the seller account, but did not have the address of the bank branch. Since i did not know how to ask "what is the address of the branch?" i asked "doko wa ginkou desu ka?, but was not sure of the grammar so i provided an example by finding the address of another well known bank (like citibank jp) and then wrote ???? instead of the address for the seller branch address. This is just an example, but as long as the discussion stays simple, i can manage it. And when the @nifty translation does not satisfy me, i just ask the seller to write down in romaji.

As for receiving a defective item, that is a risk that you take whenever you buy something on an auction site, so i don't think it matters that much here. It all depends on "how good of an auction buyer you are"

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groink
Posts: 2023
Joined: Dec 8th, '03, 03:58
Location: Pearl City, Hawaii

Post by groink » Jun 27th, '06, 07:16

Sakado wrote:As for receiving a defective item, that is a risk that you take whenever you buy something on an auction site, so i don't think it matters that much here. It all depends on "how good of an auction buyer you are"
???????? :crazy: Defective is defective is defective. Even the most professional of buyers will come across defective merchandise. There is no buyer that can predict damaged goods because of shipping. Or lost items in shipping. I've had to deal with the Japanese postal service on several occasions because of lost merchandise. Not the fault of the seller or the buyer. Most sellers do not take responsibility for lost items because, in all honesty, they had no control over the outcome. Now try getting the seller to refund your money because of a wrongdoing of the postal system.

THIS is why most Japanese don't like dealing with people outside of Japan. I've bought about 300 products off Yahoo Japan auctions over the last three years. Most of the merchandise are rare NHK books, drama OST CDs, NHK taiga and asadora DVDs, and anything Sakai Noriko. The trick is to understand written Japanese when communicating freely with sellers. If the seller states that he only sells within Japan, I'll resort to using Rinkya to help with the transaction. Rinkya ships in bulk, so I usually spend about US$150 on EMS shipping of several dozen items. And if there is any damage or loss in shipping to me, the insurance included with EMS will cover it. But in your case, you'll have to pay insurance on EVERY item that comes out of Japan. That's really the power of deputy services - the shipping.

--- groink

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