Quick question for those who know Japanese

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Schala
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Quick question for those who know Japanese

Post by Schala » Mar 12th, '06, 21:39

Ok, this is gonna seem random, but I do have a purpose for asking this.

If I wanted to say "The firefly's hope" in Japanese, it would be...

Hotaru no kibou

Right? Or if not, what would it be?

Thanks!

(Sorry this seems random, but I do have a purpose for asking this, but I can't give out details for fear of people stealing my ideas. ^^0)
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Post by Prince of Moles » Mar 12th, '06, 22:26

Yup that looks right.

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Post by Sabre » Mar 12th, '06, 22:36

How about "Hotaru no nozomi" ?? :unsure:

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Post by Schala » Mar 13th, '06, 00:09

Sabre wrote:How about "Hotaru no nozomi" ?? :unsure:
Well, in my dictionary, it says nozomi is the verb form, and kibou is the noun form.
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Post by groink » Mar 13th, '06, 00:27

Schala wrote:
Sabre wrote:How about "Hotaru no nozomi" ?? :unsure:
Well, in my dictionary, it says nozomi is the verb form, and kibou is the noun form.
The difference between a noun form and a verb form would be:

Noun: "Arakawa Shizuka is the hope for all of Japan to bring home the gold medal."

Verb: "I hope that Arakawa Shizuka will bring the gold medal back to Japan."

Looking at the context of Schala's phrase, "hope" is being used as a noun, where "hope" can be thought of as a physical object belonging to the firefly, even though you really can't touch/feel/see/smell hope.

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Post by 8thSin » Mar 13th, '06, 01:05

This thread should be in General Discussions. :blink

Kibou and Nozomi can both be nouns or verbs, depending on use. Kibou as verb would mean 'to request'. Nozomi as noun is 'hope' or 'wish'.
"(someone) no kibou" sounds like a request or demand in Japanese. Kibou is more like "Hope for (someone)" than "(someone)'s hope".

I would go with Sabre's "Hotaru no Nozomi". Unless... You mean like "This place is the firefly's (last/best) hope for survival".

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Schala
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Post by Schala » Mar 13th, '06, 01:53

Well, now I'm confused. Should I use kibou or nozomi? :scratch:
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Post by groink » Mar 13th, '06, 02:04

Schala wrote:Well, now I'm confused. Should I use kibou or nozomi? :scratch:
My vote goes to Hotaru no Nozomi

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Post by juanicths » Mar 13th, '06, 02:15

Schala wrote:Well, now I'm confused. Should I use kibou or nozomi? :scratch:
I agree with 8thSin... It really depends on (1) what kind of tone you wanna project with "firefly's hope" (2) how you wanna say it...

"hotaru no kibou" sounds more like a statement, that you are statinga fact, and this comes across very strongly (very forceful sounding)

"hotaru no nozomi" is more toned down, gives a more wistful impression of the firefly's hope...

do hope this helps

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Post by ephesus » Mar 13th, '06, 04:07

My vote goes for "faia- furai no ho-pu" :)

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Post by neonkinpatsu » Mar 13th, '06, 04:26

I can't really give any advice b/c I don't know the context. There's no sentence, elaboration, or knowledge of what is going on w/ the firefly. :sweat: It's probably just me.... But what little I grabbed of it, nozomi sounds better. But, that is the opinion of a non-fluent person who didn't really think about it. :lol

I already know my Japanese knowledge is sucking more and more daily from lack of use, but in my experience, many many many times I hear or read something in Japanese that makes total sense in my head and I fully understand it, but just cannot pick the correct English words to explain it. I feel that there are sooooooo many times that translations for Japanese to English and English to Japanese just don't fit exactly.

Since the original description is in English, I wouldn't disagree w/ using 蛍のホープ (Hotaru no Hope).

Not sure if it helps at all b/c I was never fluent in Japanese, but I was taught or at least understood that the verb 望む (where nozomi/望み comes from) was like desiring or wishing (for success or happiness, or something like that). But then again, I *rarely* heard kibou used. And, uh, which kibou is it? Aren't there a few kanji combos for it, like 2 or 3? Kibou seems too complicated to get into, for me, anyway :alcoholic:
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Post by Prince of Moles » Mar 13th, '06, 06:48

Well as people have noted, you really can't decide without knowing the context.

Let me say this, Nozomi is yamato kotoba, meaning a native Japanese word. And Kibou is kanji, meaning originally it was a Chinese word.

The general rule of thumb is that the yamato kotoba are more informal, warmer, while the originally Chinese words are more formal, cooler.

Both are fine but it will depend on the context if you want to find the best fit.

And finally in contemporary Japanese, there's a flood of Western words, most of which are used when you want to convey hipness. So Hoopu is also a fully acceptable candidate.

(But I wouldn't use Firefly, that English word hasn't become part of the Japanese language, [yet?])

On a totally different side note, I think this explains why many Japanese still don't like to use "ai shiteru" and prefer "suki," "daisuki," or "koi shiteru." Ai is a Chinese term and it still has that formal, coolness attached to it. While the other three are all yamato kotoba.

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Post by Schala » Mar 13th, '06, 11:23

Well, from what everyone has said, I think I'll use nozomi then.

Thanks everyone for your help and input!
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Post by uniquo » Mar 15th, '06, 02:24

Schala.. what is the name of the series you made your banner from? it looks very interesting... can you tell me please? I'd like to download it.

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Post by Schala » Mar 15th, '06, 04:57

uniquo wrote:Schala.. what is the name of the series you made your banner from? it looks very interesting... can you tell me please? I'd like to download it.
It's actually not a series, but a movie called Azumi, starring Aya Ueto.
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