please help with language barrier

Discuss chinese drama series here.
Post Reply
User avatar
Antipete
Posts: 12
Joined: Oct 17th, '05, 22:09

please help with language barrier

Post by Antipete » May 24th, '11, 00:45

We have a need to understand something.

In many asian drama's in cantonese or mandarin when someone gets killed you will see a Bhuddist monk say something which in english sounds like this.......

A-me-da-fo, I thought it meant like Bhudda Bless you or something like that so.
for the sake of argument couls someone list how onw would say, and how it would sound in english these 2 phrases.
In both Cantonese and Mandarin if you would be so kind, please.



1>Buddha Bless You

2>Merciful Buddha

Thank you so much!

Antipete

xploring
Posts: 363
Joined: Jan 16th, '08, 01:48

Post by xploring » May 24th, '11, 02:18

The second one is probably closer to the truth but it's just something the monks say, I don't think most (or at least a lot) of the chinese know the meaning behind those words, unless they are actually buddhist probably... I am a native speaker and I don't know either.

theuncontactable
Fansubber
Fansubber
Posts: 130
Joined: Feb 22nd, '08, 12:53
Contact:

Post by theuncontactable » May 24th, '11, 04:10

I've searched the Japanese equivalent which is:
namu amida butsu

and Wikipedia came up with this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Namu_amida ... ious_forms

but I think only Buddhist monks know what it means (or maybe they don't because it is used also as a meditative chant and in meditation the mind is supposed to be empty of all thought).

I think it is usually translated as: "May Buddha have mercy on my/your soul" but it could be deeper than that. I have asked some Japanese people before and they don't know what it means either. I think you have to know Sanskrit to find out it's true meaning as well as being deeply involved in Buddhism.

User avatar
Antipete
Posts: 12
Joined: Oct 17th, '05, 22:09

Post by Antipete » May 24th, '11, 05:46

wow
,
thanx so much for the answers. What you guys say now makes total sense. I tried language translators but again couldnt get too far with this. I listened to it over and over through the years and now studying meditation for the first time I got a lot of of your 2 answers and again I thank you so much!

User avatar
vancoland
Posts: 249
Joined: Jan 15th, '06, 02:09

Post by vancoland » Jun 19th, '11, 22:03

It is literally the name of Amida Buddha or Amidabha. 阿彌陀佛 or Ēmítuó Fó in Pinyin. Fó literally means Buddha. The monks are chanting the Buddha's name. In particular, Ēmítuó Fó because of one of his vows to "save" whoever chants his name (it's more complicated than "save") in their time of death. Amidabha is said to be the creator of the Pure Land located in the uttermost west (there are also other main Buddhas located in the other 4 directions including center). The monks chant this name because it is believed that it would help every being (it is one of Amidabha's vows), once dead, to be re-born into this land, where you can reach something beyond pure happiness.

You will also hear many references when someone is about to duel, especially dueling with a monk, that they will send the other person to this "Pure Land or 極樂" in wuxia series. Meaning that they will send them to their death. They are referring to Amidabha's created place. This however, will rarely get translated into English subtitles, as most people will just refer to it as "I will send you to your doom" or something of that sort.
I want to see Li Bing Bing

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest