Dramas with Depth? (attn film students!)

Discuss Korean drama series here.
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raisonpure
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Dramas with Depth? (attn film students!)

Post by raisonpure » Aug 1st, '08, 07:47

I am looking for an ambitious Korean or Japanese drama that is intricate enough to analyze and write a critical essay on. Presently, I am interested in The Snow Queen because of the delicacy with which it is delivered. I love it for being more than just a love story that you can cry over and then forget as soon as it's finished. Rather, it is a memorable allegory about coping with death, the consequences of escaping from reality, finding the courage to face reality in all its brutality, and moving on. You can tell that the love story isn't just there to entertain. It exists as a process by which TW&BR find salvation from themselves, and as a means to impart messages like:

“cherish the people around you while you can -- don't do something that you'll forever regret”
“life's too short to waste our time on hurting each other”
“you shouldn't mar the beauty of love by giving up yourself for it”
“We can evade reality, but we cannot evade the consequences of evading reality” (to quote Ayn Rand)

Furthermore, it's fascinating how parallels are made between Bo-Ra and the fairy tale's characters through motifs such as the snowflakes decorating Bo-Ra's window and the Red beeper she keeps in memory of Tae-Woong. And Tae-Woong, whose view of everything becomes tainted after his friend's death, is very obviously Kay.

There's some more noteworthy aspects that I'd like to record of when I rewatch the series, but I'm still worried that there ultimately won't be enough for me to write about. So as a precaution, I'd like recommendations of dramas for which one can answer the following questions:
Plot & Structure
The beginning – list important points such as how characters are introduced and developed, any repetition of key sentences or ideas, how the opening impacts on the rest of text.
A turning point – is a moment in the text where a character changes because they were faced with an important decision. Note when this happened, what lead up to the turning point and what was the result.
Key scenes or important detail – what do these sections show the reader about the overall ideas of the text? What techniques have been used to create and develop ideas and tension?
The ending – list important points such as how the characters have changed and developed throughout the text. Note how the beginning and end are similar and/or different. Is there a 'twist' or are we left hanging without a clear resolution? How satisfactory is the ending? What is implied beyond the ending – hope or futility?

Why these methods are effective for your text
After describing how your text has been structured give specific reasons as to why this has been done to create maximum impact. Think about how characters and themes have been revealed.

Setting & Context
How and why the setting changes in the text?
How does the setting influence a character's feelings, actions and relationships?
Identify and explain the techniques used to describe the mood and atmosphere of the setting.
How can the setting represent or symbolise an idea?
How does the context challenge the values and beliefs of the reader?

Outline – the main setting, including important physical details, write quotes with descriptive detail, and how the character reacts to their surroundings.
Positive and negative – chart the benefits and restrictions, limits and freedom the context has on the main character(s).
Chart – how the setting changes from the beginning, middle, and end of the text. How does setting effect the main character's development?
Evaluate to what extent the setting supports the theme.
How does the setting provide insight into another world? How does this allow the reader to understand their own world better?
How are contrasting settings used to show conflict or opposing ideas?
How have social occasions in the text(s) been used to show values related to the entire text?

Production Techniques
Production techniques are the features used to make the text(s) interesting and unique. Techniques may include: music, dialogue, lighting, graphics, colour, special effects, soundtrack, camera work, layout, use of space, oral and visual production techniques, or use of links. By looking at the production techniques closely you will gain a better understanding of how the text has been produced in order to present the themes, characters, settings, and plot. The attitude of the director towards the character helps to set the mood or feeling of the text. Think about how the techniques and the mood of text work together to make the production convincing.

Structure – how the text and the ideas have been put together. Look at the overall structure of the text(s), the order of scenes, sequencing, and transitions.
Narrative point of view – who is telling the story and how does this influence what the audience experiences and feels towards the text? The director will choose and/or change the point of view to control the relationship between the audience and the character to support their purpose. Changes in perspective can be shown by techniques such as voice over and camera shots, like the point of view shot. See Film Terms. Narrative style refers to how the subject matter is presented to the audience. See the style chart for analysis ideas.
Dialogue – identify repeated language patterns in a character's speech. Look at the types of words used and how they speak. What does this show you about their personality and background? Think about how the voice is used to show subtle changes in emotion, accent used to show social status and background, and gesture to show response to other characters.

Characterisation
Major character – describe their physical and personal qualities, any strengths and weaknesses and how they deal with an important issue.
How relationships are created and developed between main and minor characters?
How are the characters revealed or developed? Think about style and language features.

What language techniques have been used to make the character seem real?
Identify 3 examples of when the main character showed or lacked responsibility, honesty, insight, or self-knowledge. How do these qualities show changes in the character?
Compare the qualities and circumstances of the main character and a significant minor character. How does this relationship affect each individual?
How do some characters reflect or conform to stereotypes or values of society?
How does the point of view impact on the reader's understanding and response to characters?
How has change in character(s) been used to show insight into the human condition?
How are characters developed through visual means, rather than spoken words?

Theme & Purpose
What are the themes your text(s) presents?
Who is involved with these themes?
How have these themes been shown and developed?
What have the characters learned from dealing with this theme?
What is the theme showing us about our world and values
What does the title mean? Where in the text(s) does it appear? What characters and themes are connected with the title?

How has the theme been shown to the reader and how effective are these techniques?

Conflict is used to reveal themes. Choose a significant event that shows conflict developing for an important character in your text(s).

How has structure and/or character(s) been used to show the themes?

How have symbols and language been used to develop themes?

How does the writer present issues such as truth, justice, prejudice, pain, passion in the text(s)?

How does the writer use themes to comment or criticise society?

Conflict & Symbol
How has conflict been used to highlight strengths and weakness in our own society?
What symbols are used in the text(s)?

What does each symbol mean and who is connected with it?
How effective is each symbol
Last edited by raisonpure on Aug 2nd, '08, 23:09, edited 1 time in total.

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belleza
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Post by belleza » Aug 1st, '08, 10:57

Actually for those quotes and themes that you mentioned, I'd recommend checking out Ruler of Your Own World. The screenwriter In Jung Ok also writes some of the best standalone lines in the business, so there's quite a bit of material to quote in your essay. Unless you want to purchase it, Ruler's harder to find than other dramas.

Resurrection is another good one, especially since its themes touch on heady stuff like sin, revenge, and fate. Mawang/The Devil is another good one for that, though Resurrection is more successful.

White Tower, which has been remade many times, has a lot to say about power, social politics, and so on. Not sure if it'll fit your essay though.

Memories of Bali is a subversive Cinderella melodrama that holds up as a critique on social class, and materialism. It can interpreted as a dialectical, satirical and naturalist drama, and there's pretty wide latitude in interpreting the motivations of the lead female character.

Alone in Love is also a good candidate (and its quotability factor rivals Ruler of Your Own World.) It's a often funny, sometimes heartbreaking meditation on life (and grief) through the vehicle of love. The production is highly sophisticated, using more medium shots and clever edits than expected from a TV production.

On the J-drama front, this year you have Bara no Nai Hanaya, which covers death, secrets, lies, and forgiveness and Ashita no Kita Yoshio. Both are terrifically quotable, and hold up to analysis.

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Post by ackirom » Aug 2nd, '08, 05:33

Aren't they all like that? You can, per se, analyze each and every one of 'em and find meaning even in the most superficial of dramas if you really wanted to.

Is this for school? The hidden part of your post seems to point to text, as in literature... as in a book? If you base it on a drama, assuming you don't understand nor speak Korean, you're grounding your essay in part from the translator's interpretation. Under Production Techniques, it asks you to write about Dialogue, and identify the repeated language patterns in a character's speech... but sometimes, fansubbers use more than one translator and then the text and what that character's saying gets changed. And how can you cite your source properly? There're no page numbers to go by... would it be... Episode 8, 05:17, Ental version? :lol

Kidding. But, if you'd rather still, I recommend MaWang. If MaWang were a novel, you could easily answer all those questions, and I mean easily. Also, maybe Coffee Prince... I mean, the guy thought he was in love with another guy (in Korea? no way!) and nearly went insane! :lol

raisonpure
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Post by raisonpure » Aug 2nd, '08, 10:43

belleza wrote:White Tower, which has been remade many times, has a lot to say about power, social politics, and so on. Not sure if it'll fit your essay though.
Is White Tower very different from Shiroi Kyoto?
ackirom wrote:]Is this for school? The hidden part of your post seems to point to text, as in literature... as in a book? If you base it on a drama, assuming you don't understand nor speak Korean, you're grounding your essay in part from the translator's interpretation. Under Production Techniques, it asks you to write about Dialogue, and identify the repeated language patterns in a character's speech... but sometimes, fansubbers use more than one translator and then the text and what that character's saying gets changed. And how can you cite your source properly? There're no page numbers to go by... would it be... Episode 8, 05:17, Ental version? :lol
Yes, it is for school. Films, television programmes, and drama productions fall under the category of "visual texts" over here. Also, the citing standards are loose enough that one can get away with just the quote(s). As for Dialogue... I doubt it will be too much of a problem, since they don't ask you questions centered on Dialogue in the first place. It is only one facet of production techniques which may not even figure prominently in a TV show unless the screenwriter is exceptionally talented or dedicated. So the omission can be easily compensated by drawing attention to other facets such as colour, camera work, music, costume, use of space, etc.
Aren't they all like that? You can, per se, analyze each and every one of 'em and find meaning even in the most superficial of dramas if you really wanted to.

Perhaps. But it would be more difficult to make something out of nothing, and even if I could accomplish the feat, finding meaning isn't enough. Identifying "how the text(s) makes you feel or what it made you think about" is but the bare minimum for passing. In order to achieve more, one has to fulfill most of the following:
- respond to all parts of the question equally and develop a direct and full discussion or argument around the text and the question
- thoroughly examine the text(s) by close reading significant parts so you can make valid conclusions about writer's purpose and craft
- show how the writer's style relates to purpose and audience as well as the qualities and characteristics of the genre
- support your study by reading other critical academic articles about your text to help clarify ideas
- distinguish and/or evaluate how certain effects, ideas, and elements are presented and why they were presented in that particular way - integrate evidence of production techniques and quotation to show an appreciation of the wider text(s)
- examine how production techniques have been used to shape the viewer's or listener's point of view <- so not just any drama will do. it would be preferable if the drama employed a variety of production techniques to manipulate the audience, and the more creative, the better.
- make relevant and mature conclusions based on personal response and understanding to show how issues raised by the text(s) are relevant to you and make value judgements
- think across and beyond the text(s) and reflect on society, the implications for characters and/or show an appreciation of craft
- use mature expression of ideas and thought throughout your essay
write over 500 words clearly, logically, and accurately.

ackirom
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Post by ackirom » Aug 2nd, '08, 11:36

Aah. Visual text... like in a film class :lol
raisonpure wrote: So the omission can be easily compensated by drawing attention to other facets such as colour, camera work, music, costume, use of space, etc.
Production techniques eh? Can't go wrong with The Devil. Take the lawyer for instance. He's perfect on the outside. Calm, aloof, flawless speech, evenly spaced gait... but, everytime the camera looks at him, you just know something's amiss. It's always off at an angle, or just off to the side. At first you don't know what it is, but you get the feeling there's something not right about this guy. And whenever he's in deep contemplation, alone in his apartment, he's always peering through the blinds. And when he opens his eyes, it's like ready to conquer another day. Plus to me, it sounded like, they always had to play the last notes of the soundtracks whenever the camera flashed on him as if to give off something ominous. In contrast to the other main character, the detective, always lookin tired and haggard, with his awkward speech and rugged mannerisms--well you get the picture. I say give it a try, it's only 20 eps :P

sveta
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Post by sveta » Aug 2nd, '08, 12:01

Hmm, i hope my suggestions can help also. I watch more JDoramas than anything else. Why not try Kou Kou Kyoshi 1993? Its about a high school teacher who falls in love with a student. I like the hidden secrets within that drama :D I think you also get to see a remarkable character change in the protagonist, the high school teacher.

Then there's Yasha, a sci-fi, sort of, JDorama that has fictional twin brothers and how they met.

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Post by Daxiuyi » Aug 2nd, '08, 13:40

Having written an essay on the history of Korean film and TV myself, my personal favourite in terms of analysis is "Delightful Girl Chunhyang." It is a modern retelling of a very famous Korean story, which is good for your essay imo because you can compare with the countless film versions of the same story. In that sense it gives you a lot of context, much more context than other K-dramas.

The key feature of this drama that is worthy of analysis is the bits at the end of each episode where the actors play their characters again, but in the original historical environment. This allows them to totally twist both the original story and the underlying plot of the drama for comic effect, which particularly after some of the sad scenes provides a good contrast.

IMO this is the key feature of (good) K-dramas - their ability to seamlessly move across the emotional spectrum from happiness to sadness, heavy to light mood and tragedy to comedy.

The other key feature that imo sets K-dramas apart is the actors themselves and their facial expressions. Another reason I'd use DGCH is the performances of Jae Hee and Han Chae-yong as the two main leads (as well as Om Tae-woong). Some of their facial expressions are pure gold and in many respects really carry the drama.

Hope these little snippets help. If you want any more info, just PM me.

Good Luck with your essay.

PS: Your list sounds almost word-for-word like my high school English syllabus!

Thuan
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Post by Thuan » Aug 2nd, '08, 14:18

I'm currently watching STRAWBERRY ON THE SHORTCAKE. It's written by the guy who wrote Kou Kou Kyoshi.
Two episodes to go, but so far it would be perfect for your essay.

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maakopla
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Post by maakopla » Aug 2nd, '08, 14:46

I think that you could consider a drama called Thank You for your essay. all needed info here

It's pretty touching drama. Acting is good and screenwriting brilliant. It just gets better and better with every episode and it totally hooks you. It's not just another light comedy-romance drama but it's deep enough to make you think about several things. In it people are forced to face difficult things, they are forced to accept things as they are. It's not easy for an adult to watch how a kid suffers because of their mistakes. They are forced to see how miserable a child's life can be without the child noticing it. But at the same time their own problems won't leave them. A man who is unable to get over his lost love, a woman who can't bring herself to truly protect important people in her life, a man who knows the truth but can't accept it, a grandma who doesn't want to accept the truth because it could be disgraceful, a woman who sees the truth but wants to escape it and an old man who is unable to forget his lost child and unable to see the miserable side of the truth, so he can only be happy, a kid who learns about the truth and simply accepts it as it is. A drama about a nice fairytale that was broken by cruel reality. If the secret had never leaked out life could have been peaseful and good. But it's impossible to hide such a big thing.

For example female lead drove me crazy because I really didn't understand what she was thinking. She was so annoying but then she said "I have been listening" and boom I was touched and I was able to understand every single act and found it very meaningful. She had been suffering too, a lot. It showed me that a character can change, you don't need to hear many words to notice it. It was a speechless change. A viewer was able to see the changes with just her expressions, it was enough. It's not only the leading female but everyone. When they slowly accepted facts that had to be accepted they changed.

I am sure that Thank You will answer all of your questions. And it copes with listed things:
“cherish the people around you while you can -- don't do something that you'll forever regret”
“life's too short to waste our time on hurting each other”
“you shouldn't mar the beauty of love by giving up yourself for it”
“We can evade reality, but we cannot evade the consequences of evading reality” (to quote Ayn Rand)

it's filmed very beautifully, music fits the scenes and cameraman did great job. I really wish you would give it a chance.

I also agree with belleza's picks. I remember your comments in WHIB topic mad eme speechless xD Although I didn't like WHIB because I found it stupid in a way but it's deep. For some reason even though I told everyone I hated it it didn't bore me at all and the ending was one of the bests out there.
Now watching:
Korean: Witch´s romance. Triangle, Big Man, Gourmet

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Post by gnossienneslent » Aug 2nd, '08, 16:11

First of all, I have to agree that unless you are fluent in Korean/Japanese (and I'm going to make the bold assumption that you aren't or you might have noticed by now they are two different languages and cultures and it would therefore serve you well to take the time to put 'or' between the two instead of a slash) you should probably shy away from doing analysis on literature, no wait tv shows... I thought the subject was attn literature students...? That said, I guess there are a few dramas like Rondo that deal with the issues between Japanese and Koreans, who despite the recent Korean 'boom' in Japan are still not treated very well if they reside in Japan. But then you are probably bound to have harsh relations between two neighboring countries that have highly nationalist themes in their curriculum. I digress. The rambling point here is that you need to focus on one culture or the other or the relationship between the two because there is a difference.

Second, why take a poll? Do you have enough time to watch all the show these people are rattling off? I mean, if you haven't watched enough drama to be doing this on your own then it's probably not a good subject for your paper and if you have watched enough and still can't do it on your own then you need to work on being a better student.

Third, again assuming you don't know the language, are you planning to do analysis from your perspective (whatever it is) or are you confident that you understand the culture well enough to analyze it within that context on it's own terms?

Finally, before you think I'm just here to be sarcastic and insincere, I would suggest I Jukilnomui Sarang (A Love to Kill) if you go for a Korean drama. I think there are some points of interest in the changing perspective in the overlap from the end of one episode to the lead in of the next. I found it to be a very clever use of the segmented nature of dramas giving the viewer multiple perspectives of the same scene, while supplying the viewer with the necessary refresher. I think all four of the messages you mentioned are present in some form. Well, I'm not going to keep going with it. It's your job to hash it out if that's the show you wind up going with.


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maakopla
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Post by maakopla » Aug 2nd, '08, 17:50

I would suggest I Jukilnomui Sarang (A Love to Kill)
is a good pic too. Screenwriter Lee Kyung Hee also wrote Thank You, Sang Doo, Breathless and I'm Sorry I love you. Any of these dramas would be a great pick for your project since they all have deep meanings in them. My favorite would be Sang Doo or MISA. Sad, very sad shows but unforgettable.

Now that gnossienneslent pointed it out I kinda agree with her. If you have watched only 1 or 2 Kdramas this project might be a bit too much for you. Only after watching many dramas you will be able to tell what's good and what's bad, what's typical and what's extraordinary, what's intelligent and what's plain stupid. Or then you should watch 1 drama from each category like comedy, love, action, historical etc. But that will take soooo much time... When it comes to language. I guess subtitles don't tell everything but isn't that enough? Then again after watching many dramas the language will become more "understandable" and you will be able to pick up and translate some easy sentences. After watching many dramas typical and not typical you will learn about culture as well.

For example about Plot & Structure: to be able to assort the beginning and turning point it takes time. Asian dramas are not like American dramas. After watching these dramas for years you will be able even predict correctly what kind of turning point will different beginnings have. My point is that at first everything seems interesting and a person who is not very familiar with Asian dramas my find certain things brilliant and great when in fact they are just typical, overused clichees. That's why dramas such as Full House, My Girl and Goong are so popular. People start with these dramas. (I loved Full House too back then but that was before I started watching actually GOOD dramas)
Now watching:
Korean: Witch´s romance. Triangle, Big Man, Gourmet

raisonpure
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Post by raisonpure » Aug 3rd, '08, 02:18

@gnossienneslent
Your assumption is correct, though one does not necessarily have to be fluent in Japanese or Korean to tell that they are "two different languages and cultures." And in some universities, the study of Film is part of the broader category of Literature, hence "attn literature students." Since you seem to be disturbed by details such as these, I have amended them for your comfort.
Third, again assuming you don't know the language, are you planning to do analysis from your perspective (whatever it is) or are you confident that you understand the culture well enough to analyze it within that context on it's own terms?
I had no intention to analyze the drama(s) within the context of culture. If I wanted to write an essay in which I could relate my analysis to society, I would be doing a film (an English one) instead. But now that you mention it, culture could factor into production techniques, so perhaps I should think twice about overlooking it.
Second, why take a poll? Do you have enough time to watch all the show these people are rattling off? I mean, if you haven't watched enough drama to be doing this on your own then it's probably not a good subject for your paper and if you have watched enough and still can't do it on your own then you need to work on being a better student.
I can watch 1-2 shows every weekend, and no, I'm not going to watch all of them from start to end. I'll be focusing on the ones that interest me and have the qualities that I'm looking for.

I'm not new to Jdramas, but the problem is that I'm new to studying film and watching dramas from a technical perspective. Because I've been paying little attention to details until recently, I can't tell if the ones that stand out in my memories are worthy of analysis unless I watch them again -- closely. Even if I do, there's the possibility that they'll turn out to be lacking in technical merit, and were memorable for reasons that wouldn't meet the requirements. I created this thread so as to narrow down the options and reduce the risk of wasting time, not because I need others to do all the analyzing for me. I beg your pardon if that was the impression I gave you.

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Post by biniBningPunkista » Aug 3rd, '08, 02:46

try this korean drama---> http://wiki.d-addicts.com/Soulmate it might not kind of look good in the synopsis. but i think it will be a good critical thinking type of drama as you say.

as for Jdrama, if i was really biased i would recommend Hana Yori Dango because im completely biased and its my favorite show. but for the sake of your review, i would recommend "Kimi Wa Petto" the situation itself is worth reviewing. there are such things as defying the norms. even in a comedy an indept review can be made ^_^v

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belleza
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Post by belleza » Aug 3rd, '08, 05:39

Is White Tower very different from Shiroi Kyoto?
More or less same story. Either would be excellent for an essay.

Personally, I think the perfect drama for your essay would be Conspiracy in the Court/Seoul's Sad Song, a fusion saguek show. It's only 8 episodes, and the story is laid out like a novel. So you can analyze it as such. And both the narrative and production are executed as a urban mystery. However, this one may be hard to find.

If your essay needs to emphasize on production techniques, I would recommend checking out Alone in Love (surreal nonsequiturs intermixed with film-style technique), Damo (wuxia meets CSI meets ?!?), Fashion 70s (wartime visual tropes), Mawang/Devil (psychological thriller), Resurrection (thriller), Someday (mixes animation/manha stills with live action), Hello Fransceska (gothic) or Soulmate (non-linear and Tarantino-esque emphasis on marrying songs thematically to scenes.)

J-dramas are a bit stronger in this category though. For example, Last Friends blended melodrama with psychological thriller tropes. As a result, there was a lot of emphasis on camera placements, mood soundtracking, and editing.

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Post by ackirom » Aug 3rd, '08, 10:30

raisonpure wrote:, and no, I'm not going to watch all of them from start to end. I'll be focusing on the ones that interest me and have the qualities that I'm looking for.
Whaaat?? Pfft, you might as well give up on dramas and just analyze a movie. Dramas are meant to be watched from beginning to the end, even if only for the sake of analysis. Else, how are you gonna see a character develop... or anything develop for that matter. Characters change, themes may evolve, and settings do too. Watching a few eps just isn't enough. Try an HK film like Infernal Affairs, or a Korean one like Shiri or even the Japanese Godzilla movies~~~ I remember I had an English teacher rambling on about how Godzilla represented the U.S. destroying Japan.. but then this teacher also said the apple in Snow White represented the apple of Adam and Eve and the mirror was how women saw themselves--oh wait, you're more focused on production techniques...ok, try a Tarentino film! :lol

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gnossienneslent
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Post by gnossienneslent » Aug 8th, '08, 15:11

raisonpure wrote:Since you seem to be disturbed by details such as these, I have amended them for your comfort.
I take no more comfort in your amended folly as I did it's pure form. But really, there is little you could do to disturb me.
and also wrote:And in some universities, the study of Film is part of the broader category of Literature
I'm not particularly interested in how your university is categorizing your courses. If a university lacks funding to have independent film and literature departments, it's not uncommon combine the two. Others might be motivated to lend status of literature to film because, well, most critics still prefer the book. (Personally I think this is a disservice to film since it fails to recognize film as it's own independent medium.) A university is an institution with political and financial motivation.

I do concede that there are similar elements to both film and literature, but there are also enormous differences. Literature is centered around creation and film is more concerned with interpretation of a story that has already been created by someone else, in most cases.
you then foolishly wrote:I had no intention to analyze the drama(s) within the context of culture.
You seem to have a particular interest in production techniques, but i you listed the following points to consider in the dialogue:
I'm not sure who originally wrote:Look at the types of words used and how they speak. What does this show you about their personality and background? Think about how the voice is used to show subtle changes in emotion, accent used to show social status and background, and gesture to show response to other characters.
Without a firm background in language and culture, you will have a serious handicap. You can't rely on subtitles. I've seen professionally translated subtitles with mistakes in them. For the average viewer it's sufficient for entertainment purposes. You certainly shouldn't rely on subs you get here because translators here are not all the same level and even the best aren't going to take the time to translate in detail the subtleties of dialects and types of speech (partly because English lacks some of the linguistic features to make that happen).
I haven't lost hope because you also wrote:I beg your pardon...
...and it serves you well to do so.

Oh, and I would say that Camouflage is probably one of the better dramas to analyze because it's broken down into four 3-episode stories by different director and writer teams with the central theme of lies. The writer for the show explains it before the episode and there is documentary footage before and after the segment. It's far more subtle than the messages you listed, but this is as literary as I've ever seen television. Since akirom mentioned Tarantino, it does remind me a little of Four Rooms. Unfortunately for you, only two of the episodes have been translated.


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