Learning Korean

Anhyong haseyo. Post Korean related stuff here.
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Ethlenn
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Postby Ethlenn » Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:55 pm

It's correct, 동생^^
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Postby Neliets » Wed Jul 28, 2010 9:22 pm

Ethlenn wrote:It's correct, 동생^^

누나 무슨 일인데?

Ok, I'm going away from keyboard, see you tomorrow. 잘자!

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Postby Ethlenn » Wed Jul 28, 2010 9:25 pm

아무것도.

OK, I have to move this topic, cause it's not a drama topic. It will be in general Korean Section.
잘자!
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Postby Neliets » Thu Jul 29, 2010 12:51 pm

Ethlenn, can you tell me how is Past made? Like -ed in english but how does future and past work in korean?

and If I know the sentence with honorifics ( 요 for example ), but I don't want to use honorifics. How do I get rid of it? Just cut the "yo" part out?

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Postby Ethlenn » Thu Jul 29, 2010 1:14 pm

Actually ~요 is not the polite ending, only -(으)세요 is. ~요 is a regular, non-polite ending.

But I have to be sure you are able to make present tense out of adjectives and verbs. Because this is the basic.
So first, if the verb/adjective ends with:
If the stem has a yang vowel at the last syllable, use -아요;
If the stem has a yin or neutral vowel at the last syllable, use -어요.
(yang (bright) ㅏ and ㅗ series (ㅏ, ㅑ, ㅗ, ㅛ, ㅘ)
yin (dark) ㅓ and ㅜ series (ㅓ, ㅕ, ㅜ, ㅠ, ㅝ)
neutral ㅡ and ㅣ)


가다 --> 가요
오다 --->와요
먹다 --->먹어요
공부하다 --->공부해요
are you familiar with this?
Try to make the present out of these:
일하다
착하다
읽다
주다

If this is OK, I will give you the past tense.
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Postby SSpiegel » Thu Jul 29, 2010 1:28 pm

I suggest you buy yourself a textbook to learn from. Learning on the Internet isn't very effective, and given that Korean has a lot of grammar things that just don't work with the usual patterns, you're bound to make a lot of mistakes. Honestly, I tried to learn Korean by myself, but now that I've started actual Korean classes (in Korea, woo!), I've learned more in a month than I've learned by myself in 6 months. If you can find Korean classes somewhere near you, take them! If you can't, buy a textbook and study hard. I'm not saying that learning by yourself is impossible, but it just takes a lot of effort.

The -요 ending isn't really a honorific, it's more like a basic polite ending. You shouldn't leave it out unless you're talking with someone really close to you. If you want to be more informal, it usually works by leaving out the -요 ending.

Good luck!
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Postby Neliets » Thu Jul 29, 2010 3:22 pm

Ethlenn wrote:Actually ~요 is not the polite ending, only -(으)세요 is. ~요 is a regular, non-polite ending.

But I have to be sure you are able to make present tense out of adjectives and verbs. Because this is the basic.
So first, if the verb/adjective ends with:
If the stem has a yang vowel at the last syllable, use -아요;
If the stem has a yin or neutral vowel at the last syllable, use -어요.
(yang (bright) ㅏ and ㅗ series (ㅏ, ㅑ, ㅗ, ㅛ, ㅘ)
yin (dark) ㅓ and ㅜ series (ㅓ, ㅕ, ㅜ, ㅠ, ㅝ)
neutral ㅡ and ㅣ)


가다 --> 가요
오다 --->와요
먹다 --->먹어요
공부하다 --->공부해요
are you familiar with this?
Try to make the present out of these:
일하다
착하다
읽다
주다

If this is OK, I will give you the past tense.

I'm not familiar with that, but I'll give it a try.

일하다 -> 일허요
착하다 -> 착하요
읽다 -> 읽어요
주다 -> 주어요


SSpiegel, I am not really trying to learn Korean. I just want to get to know it a little bit, so if I start to learn it, I would know what is happening. I'm thinking of buying a book. And, as far as I know, it's impossible to learn Korean anywhere in Latvia.

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Postby Ethlenn » Thu Jul 29, 2010 3:50 pm

일하다 -> 일허요
착하다 -> 착하요
읽다 -> 읽어요
주다 -> 주어요


The third one is right.

일하다 it has the verv 하다, so it follows the pattern of 공부하다 --->공부해요
주다 ---> 줘요, it is called contraction.

I'm sorry, but without basics, I can give anything more complicated.
I know, I know, all my students also are like this :"how to say...", "how is...", but it's useless when they don't know the basics. And basics are boring, I know. But later on, Korean grammar may seem a bit confusing, so knowing the rules of the foundations it really help.

Go through this websites for a beginner, really beginner:
http://www.learnkorean.com/lesson/kclassindex.asp
http://korean.sogang.ac.kr/
http://www.learn-korean-now.com/beginner/beginners_korean.php
http://www.learn-korean.net/learn-korean-classes.html
And one of the bests out there:
http://www.learnkoreanlanguage.com/

I uploaded long time ago on my blog a book, just find it, download and start.
Cause a book with audio files will give you more than my tips^^
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Postby Neliets » Thu Jul 29, 2010 4:31 pm

Ethlenn wrote:
일하다 -> 일허요
착하다 -> 착하요
읽다 -> 읽어요
주다 -> 주어요


The third one is right.

일하다 it has the verv 하다, so it follows the pattern of 공부하다 --->공부해요
주다 ---> 줘요, it is called contraction.

I'm sorry, but without basics, I can give anything more complicated.
I know, I know, all my students also are like this :"how to say...", "how is...", but it's useless when they don't know the basics. And basics are boring, I know. But later on, Korean grammar may seem a bit confusing, so knowing the rules of the foundations it really help.

Go through this websites for a beginner, really beginner:
http://www.learnkorean.com/lesson/kclassindex.asp
http://korean.sogang.ac.kr/
http://www.learn-korean-now.com/beginner/beginners_korean.php
http://www.learn-korean.net/learn-korean-classes.html
And one of the bests out there:
http://www.learnkoreanlanguage.com/

I uploaded long time ago on my blog a book, just find it, download and start.
Cause a book with audio files will give you more than my tips^^

You didn't understand me the first time. I didn't want to make past/preset/future myself but I wanted to know just how it's made, so when I hear a word, I'd know if it's in future,present or past.

Without any help it's pretty much impossible to learn Korean anyways so I'm not wasting my time and that's why I just did what I could - learned Hangul. Just trying to look a step forward. And I know way too less words to even think about making a sentence or something.

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Postby Ethlenn » Thu Jul 29, 2010 5:00 pm

OK, I can tell you, but I tried to help as much as I could instead I got that I didn't understand.

This is important:
(yang (bright) ㅏ and ㅗ series (ㅏ, ㅑ, ㅗ, ㅛ, ㅘ)
yin (dark) ㅓ and ㅜ series (ㅓ, ㅕ, ㅜ, ㅠ, ㅝ)
neutral ㅡ and ㅣ)

Past is made with adding:
bright vowel in the stem + ~았~plus ending
dark vowel in the stem + ~었~plus ending

우 and 어 in the stems are contracted.
If you hear lots of "s" it's the past.
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Postby Neliets » Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:46 pm

Ethlenn wrote:OK, I can tell you, but I tried to help as much as I could instead I got that I didn't understand.

This is important:
(yang (bright) ㅏ and ㅗ series (ㅏ, ㅑ, ㅗ, ㅛ, ㅘ)
yin (dark) ㅓ and ㅜ series (ㅓ, ㅕ, ㅜ, ㅠ, ㅝ)
neutral ㅡ and ㅣ)

Past is made with adding:
bright vowel in the stem + ~았~plus ending
dark vowel in the stem + ~었~plus ending

우 and 어 in the stems are contracted.
If you hear lots of "s" it's the past.

Sorry, I forgot to thank you. Forgive me, I haven't slept in 2 days and I'm not myself right now but I'm going to sleep in 10 minutes. I thought that you misunderstood my question but seems that you didn't.

구마워!

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Postby Puppet Princess » Fri Jul 30, 2010 12:39 am

Neliets wrote:SSpiegel, I am not really trying to learn Korean. I just want to get to know it a little bit, so if I start to learn it, I would know what is happening. I'm thinking of buying a book. And, as far as I know, it's impossible to learn Korean anywhere in Latvia.


What do you mean "if"?

Obviously you are already learning since you have gone through the effort to learn 한글, are trying to learn words and conjugations, and are even thinking about buying a book.

"Learning" doesn't mean you have to be super serious, spend hours a day, or go to a formal school. The thing is, language has many parts to it that do not all have to be equal to mean you know something. Someone can be illiterate and still speak a language perfectly. They could process what they hear, but not form a coherent sentences themselves. It goes on...

While I agree that to achieve fluency in SPEAKING a language, one must dedicate a great deal of time studying and using the language with other learners and native speakers. However, to UNDERSTAND a language, one can get very far by reading and listening. Reading grammar books is how you learn the skeleton of a language. Reading books/novels/comics is how you learn the words of a language. It's even how children and adults learn new words in their native language. While we might not be able to pronounce the word 100% correctly having never heard it spoken, we can still figure out roughly how it should sound and know exactly what it means. Music, TV, and movies teaches how to listen and process the words being spoken. Also, with online communities, these days you don't really need a real teacher to answer your questions and correct your mistakes. (That's what LJ is for. lol) Only learning to speak properly really requires a real human who speaks the language too. And that too has been solved by internet language communities and skype.

Of course that all assumes each person is motivated enough to actually teach themselves. Most people are not disciplined enough to give themselves homework or continue to sit down and study if no one makes them. Something about the threat of an angry teacher really makes people focus. Though that can be solved with study partners (real life or online). I don't think the attitude, "well I'm not really trying to learn," is very healthy though. It's like telling your brain you already plan to give up once you get bored, annoyed, or frustrated. Making up your mind and saying, "I will do this, because..." is very helpful on those days you feel like chucking your notes in the trash. Having a reason and a goal are the best motivation tools if you ask me.

If you are interested, I too have several books on my blog. I actually have books for a lot of languages. But there are probably about 10 for Korean alone.

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Postby Ethlenn » Fri Jul 30, 2010 1:12 am

PuppetPrincess, do you have something on Advance level? Or do you know if there is somewhere a copy of Hollym published books?
Just curious^^
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Postby Puppet Princess » Fri Jul 30, 2010 1:43 am

I've never been able to find Hollym stuff. Most of what I have is basic elementary level stuff.
Anything more advanced I had to buy hard copies of.

I have things like...
Basic Korean Grammar and Workbook, Elementary Korean, FSI volume 1 & 2, Hangeul lessons 1-10, Seoul National University Level 1, A Guide to Contemporary Usage, Pimsleur, Korean: A Complete course for Beginners.

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Postby galbilover » Sat Sep 25, 2010 8:03 pm

To learn Korean starting with the alphabet and grammar and advanced topics, I recommend this site

http://www.yeskorean.com/

To build your Korean vocabulary and know how to pronounce them quickly, see this site

http://www.koreandictionary.net/

I update them on a weekly basis. There are tons of books and sites to learn Korean but I think these two are very good.

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Postby starbuck26 » Thu Dec 23, 2010 1:49 am

galbilover wrote:To learn Korean starting with the alphabet and grammar and advanced topics, I recommend this site

http://www.yeskorean.com/

To build your Korean vocabulary and know how to pronounce them quickly, see this site

http://www.koreandictionary.net/

I update them on a weekly basis. There are tons of books and sites to learn Korean but I think these two are very good.



Thank you for the info! I want to take a class to learn faster but I want to have some knowledge under my belt (so to speak) before hand. These should help!

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Postby Neliets » Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:58 pm

I really want to further my studies in Korean but can you give me some advice what and how can I do only learn using information from internet(w/o buying books)? I know Hangul very well now, know a few expressions and words from dramas or somewhere. I have a rough idea how sentence is build in Korean. I'm only speaking about understanding, not talking or writing. I can do that later ;D


Oh, and I can count till 10 in both ways.

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Postby Neliets » Fri Feb 04, 2011 6:23 pm

I got few books and stuff, thanks to someone ;]

I'll do my best to try to learn Korean, even a bit. Today, I read quite a lot. I learnt how is past, future and present made. At least I hope I've learnt. So, is this sentence right?

저는 내일 밥을 먹고요.
For an example I had this - "저는 내일 만날 사라미 있어요.". I'm not sure if my sentence is correct, because I wanted to put "eat" in it, but, of course, I don't know if I changed the sentence the right way. And I feel that it should end like this "먹었어요" or something. I'm probably wrong... ;D

Today I learned a few things : there is no difference between one and many, few words, how to build up a very, very basic sentence, and I learned that romanisation is stupid and hard, I'm reading a book(e-book), which everything that is in korean is Romanized, ok, I understand the reason why, but it's hard to read, it'd be much easier to read hangul and pronounce appropriately.

Btw, 12 is "십이"? And 20 is "이십"? I haven't gotten to that part, yet, but I just logically thought about it and I think that I got it right.

And is this correct? "너는 지금 TV는 보다요" I just saw my father watching TV and tried to make a sentence out of nowehere ;D Is 는 after TV necessary in this case? The translation should be : You are now watching TV.

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Postby SSpiegel » Sat Feb 05, 2011 9:30 pm

Neliets wrote:I got few books and stuff, thanks to someone ;]

I'll do my best to try to learn Korean, even a bit. Today, I read quite a lot. I learnt how is past, future and present made. At least I hope I've learnt. So, is this sentence right?

저는 내일 밥을 먹고요.
For an example I had this - "저는 내일 만날 사라미 있어요.". I'm not sure if my sentence is correct, because I wanted to put "eat" in it, but, of course, I don't know if I changed the sentence the right way. And I feel that it should end like this "먹었어요" or something. I'm probably wrong... ;D

Today I learned a few things : there is no difference between one and many, few words, how to build up a very, very basic sentence, and I learned that romanisation is stupid and hard, I'm reading a book(e-book), which everything that is in korean is Romanized, ok, I understand the reason why, but it's hard to read, it'd be much easier to read hangul and pronounce appropriately.

Btw, 12 is "십이"? And 20 is "이십"? I haven't gotten to that part, yet, but I just logically thought about it and I think that I got it right.

And is this correct? "너는 지금 TV는 보다요" I just saw my father watching TV and tried to make a sentence out of nowehere ;D Is 는 after TV necessary in this case? The translation should be : You are now watching TV.


The first sentence isn't exactly correct. I'm assuming it should say "I'm going to eat (rice) tomorrow", which would need the future tense. Saying "I'm eating (rice) tomorrow" (using present tense) would sound really weird in Korean. So, maybe it would be better to say
(저는/제가) 오늘 밥을 먹었어요 "I ate (rice) today" (past tense)
or
(저는/제가) 내일 밥을 먹을 거예요 "I'm going to eat (rice) tomorrow" (future tense)
The present tense for 먹다 is 먹어요, not 먹고요. As a cultural reference, 밥 mean rice, but it is also used in general in sentences like "밥 먹었어요?" (have you eaten?) or "밥 먹을래요?" (do you want to eat?). But if you use it in a sentence like you did, you specify the thing you've eaten as rice.
By the way, the sentence "저는 내일 만날 사라미 있어요" is really weird, where did you find it? I assume it should be 사람(이) not 사라미, but even that makes the sentence to mean "I have people I'll meet tomorrow"...

For the next sentence, if you want to say "you're watching tv (right now)", it would be
니가 텔레비전을 (tv를) 보고 있어요
or if you just want to say "you watch tv"
니가 텔레비전을 (tv를) 봐요

So, 보다 turns into 봐요, not 보다요.
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Postby Neliets » Mon Feb 07, 2011 9:20 pm

Thank you very much! I got that from a book but I maybe wrote down wrong, but I thought that it should be 사람.

Can you tell me when do you use and why 너, 너는, 니가, 네가?

I came to conclusion that 있어요 pretty much means continuous action(and of course it means the other thing... can't remember the word in english)

As for those TV-sentences, doesn't 는 describe present action?

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Postby Ethlenn » Tue Feb 08, 2011 6:40 pm

사라미 is correct, but it's colloquial, so I wouldn't recommend using it for the beginner.
사라미 is a typical example of a contradiction in a language. It happens usually with names. With Korean names ending with consonant, when we call someone by his/her name, we add "아" or "야" (when it ends with a vowel). So, ie.: Kim Namgil -->남길아 becomes 남기라. But as i said, it's banmal, and it shouldn't be thrown like that. That's why using sentences picked up from dramas and "How To Make Out in 10 minutes" books is really, really no good.

있어요 doesn't mean the continuous, only when you put a verb in "고" form before it, it signifies the continuous tense.

는 is a topic particle after the word ending with a vowel. Can you be more specific? Because 는 after the verb makes a predicative form out of the verb itself (uhm, "describing", a relative clause of some kind).

너 - you
너는 - you (as the topic)
니가 - you (as the subject)
네가 - I (as the subject)
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Postby SSpiegel » Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:02 pm

Ethlenn wrote:사라미 is correct, but it's colloquial, so I wouldn't recommend using it for the beginner.
사라미 is a typical example of a contradiction in a language. It happens usually with names. With Korean names ending with consonant, when we call someone by his/her name, we add "아" or "야" (when it ends with a vowel). So, ie.: Kim Namgil -->남길아 becomes 남기라. But as i said, it's banmal, and it shouldn't be thrown like that.

너 - you
너는 - you (as the topic)
니가 - you (as the subject)
네가 - I (as the subject)


Cool, I didn't know you use it like that, too. I only use contractions in stuff like 나는=난, 너를=널, 저 인데요=전데요 and stuff like that. And usually just in spoken language, not so much in written. I think if you do use contractions like that, it just makes it really difficult for a language learner. Gotta keep that in mind.
By the way, 네가 is you (as the subject), as it derives from 너. 내가 is I (as the subject), as it derives from 나. 니가 is used because the two sound so similar is spoken language.
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Postby Ethlenn » Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:09 pm

My bad, my eyesight went ballistic with kanji all the last week... my bad...
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Postby SSpiegel » Tue Feb 08, 2011 10:07 pm

Don't worry, I can't seem to write even one post without at least one typo in it these days...
I feel you, dude, kanji made me give up on Japanese. That's why I love Korean. Even tho it's much harder to pronounce, the writing system makes it heavenly compared to Japanese. I'm supposed to know about 500 kanji right now, but I can barely remember a hundred. -_-
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Postby Neliets » Wed Feb 09, 2011 8:02 pm

Damn you both are good... even kanji...

By the way, now I officially have a Korean(technically Chinese, but his whole family is Korean and he grew up in a Korean-based city in China) brother-in-law. ;D I need to work hard but for a lazy dumbass like me, it's quite hard.

I want to be multi-lingual but it seems very hard to learn other languages besides English. I technically learned German for 4 years but I learned pretty much nothing(ok, I admit, I skipped classes, didn't learn and so on but I should've picked up something in 4 years, don't you think so?) and now, in high school, I transferred to Russian, which is quite common in Latvia and I understand a bit. But sadly, I don't seem to progress much, though. But I've never really studied English(we have lessons quite a lot, but I am not doing much in them), I was just born knowing it? Maybe it's just some teenage crisis for me, because I can't seem to learn Korean. ;D

But even though I don't study at home etc, strangely I don't have that much time to study Korean, I don't even know how can it possibly be. I hope that next week I'll have more free time. But I'll keep learning... slowly... slowly... and I hope you will help me. :)

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Postby Neliets » Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:27 pm

Ok, I've been learning Korean quite a lot, these past few days.

Anyhow, I found a grammar book with exercises in it. Quite good, actually. Now I have at least some understanding about what, where and why. I have a solid support from native Korean(online support, of course), who knows English pretty much better than me. But the hard part is - native Korean numbers... I learned to count to 10 in Sino-Korean and native Korean few months ago, if I remember correctly, but I often forget something from native Korean and the hardest part is to remember all of them(20, 30, 40, 50 etc). I haven't tried to memorize them but it doesn't seem easy. Sino-Korean is easy, though.

anyhow, where is the pdf of the book. I have finished Unit 9, already. I take 1 Unit to school, pretty much every day, and do it in English lessons(mostly).
http://www.failiem.lv/down.php?i=gwwkop ... rkbook.pdf


I just felt like spamming some of my thoughts about English. To be honest, I feel confident about my English skills, I think I have very English skills, since English is not my native language. But I always envy those people, who's native language is English. When I'm writing something seriously, I have no grammar mistakes(there are exceptions, of course), but still - when I read something(even a post in a forum, for example) that a English person has written, it just gives a different feeling, it's not so plain. Is it possible to accomplish such state of language skills?

Anyhow, for those who want to learn Korean, I have an advice - before you even start, learn Korean alphabet. It's easy, it could take about 1 week. I used to translate(if you can call it translating...) my favorite songs lyrics. From Korean to roman(it's called romanisation, I don't know how to describe it). If you are a student, then just take lyrics with you, a notebook and in the free time romanise(I don't like this word but I have no other choice). That's what I did, and I learned it quite fast.

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Postby Viande » Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:43 pm

Ooh thank you Neliets.

I'm planning to start self-study Korean as soon as my current Japanese & Chinese courses end for this semester. At the moment my brains can't handle any extra characters. :mrgreen:

About English. I would assume that if you read a lot of different English texts and write a lot yourself, you should be able to achieve as good written skills as natives. One of my native English speaking friend once said that even she doesn't know who's native and who's not most of the time . My English is mostly bad/decent because even though I use it every day I haven't even opened my English books since... 6 years ago(?). So my English grammar skills are a bit rusty.

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Postby Neliets » Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:58 pm

I do pretty much nothing in English lessons, as I already stated - I learn Korean in English lessons ;D But I have had internet for about 5 or 6 years now, I read a lot in English. Pretty much 90% of what I'm reading on the Internet, is pure English. I assume that if I'd live in England for year or so, then I would have similar writing style. But when it comes to speaking, then I'm quite bad. I blame that I haven't had a decent chance to use English. Mostly it's just few English lessons and English exam, which was last year. I have a good pronouncation, though.


And I'm planning on learning Korean words and expressions by translating lyrics. This time, from Korean to Latvian or English. I have to study a bit more, though. I need to learn few more endings and grammar rules to do that properly. I'm aware that it won't be easy or precise but I think of uploading videos to Youtube later, so everyone who wants, can enjoy(I'm thinking of translating not so popular songs that I like).

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Postby Neliets » Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:29 pm

Yep, the counting system and numbers are the hardest, at least for now. Quite complicated.

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Postby iluvasiandrama » Sat Feb 26, 2011 6:31 pm

I should have took the Korean language course back in middle school but took German instead. Then Spanish, lots of Spanish. I just want to be able to put two and two together to make out what I hear in dramas and I have been becoming better at it.
I remember the scene from watching Nodame Cantible when Nodame kept rewinding the anime and audibly repeating what she heard in order to commit it to memory. I have learned so much just from watching the kdramas and using Google translate. So I will give it a shot now:

annyeong nae ileum-eun luveyibnida. :D I hope it's right.

P.S. My nickname is luvely or luvey.
Now watching: [b][color=green]Need to find some new dramas

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Postby Neliets » Sat Feb 26, 2011 6:59 pm

You are using annyeong informaly but luveyibnida is in the most polite form(deferential, if I remember correctly). And Nae is informal, too(not completely, it was somewhere between informal and formal(-yo)).

It should be like this - annyeonghaseyo. Jae ireumeun luveyibnida. There are quite a lot of ways how to tell your name. For example : Jeoneun luvey ibnida(seems a bit easier).

By the way, iluvasiandrama, you know how to read Korean? If not, then you should learn, it's easy and fun. You can do it in school, for example. When I have nothing better to do, write something in Korean in my notebook ;D And it's nothing hard, unlike the counting systems... But now, after a few exercises, it became clearer. It's like this - for numbers up to 20, use native Korean counting system but if more than 20, then Sino-Korean. Except months, minutes and seconds.

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Postby Ethlenn » Sat Feb 26, 2011 7:06 pm

Just to interrupt sweet chirping: "imnida", not "ibnida". What you write and what you spell is sometimes different in Korean.
And I'd go for "chae ireum eun...". You don't want to seem to be an arrogant prick when meeting someone, so "nae" is out of the question. Oh well, if you want to...
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Postby Neliets » Sat Feb 26, 2011 7:30 pm

Ethlenn wrote:Just to interrupt sweet chirping: "imnida", not "ibnida". What you write and what you spell is sometimes different in Korean.
And I'd go for "chae ireum eun...". You don't want to seem to be an arrogant prick when meeting someone, so "nae" is out of the question. Oh well, if you want to...

Wait a minute. I'm sure that it's spelled 입니다. Or you mean romanisation? Then we should do it properly, but then ㅓ -> u, not eo, ㅜ -> oo etc. But I'm not sure if romanisation of B there is M. :mrgreen:

And ooops, I made a mistake. It's Je(not Jae, and not Chae, Ethlenn). Or it works both ways. But I'm sure that it's with ㅈ not ㅊ.

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Postby Ethlenn » Sat Feb 26, 2011 7:38 pm

You don't say "ibnida" but "imnida" no matter how you write. Trust me on this one.
And it is "che", dear. Read rules about first-consecutive syllable in a word or sentence. You can write it "je" if it gives you peace of mind, but it's not the same pronounciation as in japchae, sorry.


And no, according to new romanisation 어 is written as "eo" and 우 is written as "u".
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Postby iluvasiandrama » Sat Feb 26, 2011 7:40 pm

I have been trying to read and learn the romanisation of the Hangul language (hope I said that right). Learning characters and symbols for words and letters throw me off a bit. I don't know if I want to get that serious Neliets but who knows.

Well, that's what I got when I asked my friend how to introduce myself to someone I did not know. I will have to tell her that she was wrong! Okay, using Ethlenn's and Neliets corrections, I will try it again:

annyeong haseyo, Chae ireum eun luveyimnida.
Now watching: [b][color=green]Need to find some new dramas

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Postby esmer86 » Sat Feb 26, 2011 7:50 pm

Has anyone used Rosetta Stone to learn Korean or any other language for the matter? I was always interested in it but its too expensive for my taste. If it was cheaper I would have given it a try because I heard that it helps alot and there was some good reviews on their page. Here is the link for the page if you want to check it out: ROSETTA STONE

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Postby Neliets » Sat Feb 26, 2011 8:01 pm

Hangul is Korean alphabet not language. And hanji only has characters you need to remember, but in hangul you just build syllable, it's that easy. Of course, to get the spelling 100% right is not that easy, you need to know the word then, but for fun purpose and reading, it's nothing hard. It takes barely a week to know how to write. Just take a few song lyrics and romanize them, easy, isn't it?

Yes, but it's just Che, not Chae, only Na -> Nae. I know how to pronounce it, but writing 제 is right? I'm not much of a romanizer, I preffer reading hangul, then I can pronounce it right, at least.

Ethlenn, but, as far as I've seen Koreans romanisizing something, they still use U for 어. Or am I wrong? Anyhow, it's better to read Korean, not to romanize.

Esmer86, if you are searching for online site where you can learn Korean or any other language for that matter, then try Livemocha.com, for example. I haven't tried it myself, but my father learns Norwegian there.

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Postby iluvasiandrama » Sat Feb 26, 2011 8:09 pm

I know one or two songs but not sure how to spell what I am singing. I guess I can check Youtube for some easy songs and post on here what I think the song is saying. Rosetta Stone is expensive. I think there are lots of free sites out there to learn. Several links have already been posted in this thread.
Now watching: [b][color=green]Need to find some new dramas

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Postby Ethlenn » Sat Feb 26, 2011 8:15 pm

I wrote "chae"?? Mianhae!

I hate Rosetta series. All of them. For eternity.
Romanisation 어 by "u" is the older one and usually modern scholars and all those boring professionals are leaving this one. But as you said, when you know Hangeul, you can laugh it off. It's better to learn the letters than fight over romanisation. I use the latest one (with "eo") in my research work, btw.
Also, the names are written inseparably in the new system, like Namgil, Shihu, Jaeyeong, etc.
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Postby Neliets » Sat Feb 26, 2011 8:25 pm

Ethlenn wrote:I wrote "chae"?? Mianhae!

I hate Rosetta series. All of them. For eternity.
Romanisation 어 by "u" is the older one and usually modern scholars and all those boring professionals are leaving this one. But as you said, when you know Hangeul, you can laugh it off. It's better to learn the letters than fight over romanisation. I use the latest one (with "eo") in my research work, btw.
Also, the names are written inseparably in the new system, like Namgil, Shihu, Jaeyeong, etc.

Damn, now I'm confused, a bit. To be honest, I wondered why KBS World uses this romanization style. But the names... what's up with them? I'm not talking about seperation of the names but the spelling. Ahh, it doesn't matter anyways. ;D

And, by the way, Ethlenn, what does "죠" ending describe? I haven't got that far, yet. But I'm curious.

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Postby Ethlenn » Sat Feb 26, 2011 8:30 pm

죠 is kind of a question tag. :salut:
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Postby SSpiegel » Sat Feb 26, 2011 9:39 pm

I'd say forget about romanization, it'll just make you crazy! And when you can't avoid it, like with names or places or foods, get used to the idea that there might be a few versions out there. My Korean friends still use the old system for their names, and I've actually only seen the new version on KBS World's subtitles + some instances around the Internet.

I wouldn't call 죠 (or if you want to be polite about it: 지요) a question, per se, it'd be more about seeking reassurance. I could say "재미있죠?" meaning "it's fun, isn't it?". So I'm already thinking I'm having fun and my companion is having fun, but I'm just asking to make sure. Or if my friend is looking tired, I could say "피곤하지", "you're tired, aren't you", making it more like a statement than a question.
Last edited by SSpiegel on Sat Feb 26, 2011 9:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Ethlenn » Sat Feb 26, 2011 9:43 pm

This is something in English grammar called "question tag": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tag_question
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Postby SSpiegel » Sat Feb 26, 2011 9:49 pm

Haha, you got me there! I'm so bad with grammar (both Finnish and English) and I never know what things are called. But maybe it's a good thing it got explained, since others might not know either. :)
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Postby Neliets » Sat Feb 26, 2011 10:07 pm

You got me there, too! ;D Good thing that SSpiegel posted, or else I'd think it marks some kind of question. ;D And I understood everything from your example. If I had given it a bigger thought, then I'd figure out it myself. Probably. It appears a lot in dramas, tbh.

Ahh, feels good now that I've finished Hello! Miss, My Princess and Athena. And I came to conclusion, that romantic comedies don't give the addictive feeling. Or am I just getting older? A Love To Kill still gives me a feeling, for example, but I was surfing the internet while I was watching Hello! Miss last 2 episodes. Watched My Princess too and no feeling what so ever. They weren't that bad but... yes.... Damn I'm getting old.

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Postby Neliets » Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:29 pm

I found out that you can chat with Koreans in Livemocha.com(a site where you can learn many languages and Korean is one of them). I had a chat with few Koreans. I didn't learn too much but I loved it. I could ask everything I was curious about. And damn they write fast on computer. I was shocked.

By the way, in one chat we were talking about dramas and such and she had no clue that foreigner even know kdramas(she is 22). She was very, very surprised.

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Postby Arev » Sun Mar 13, 2011 2:58 am

Here are some great sites for learning Korean:

http://langintro.com/kintro (free)
http://livemocha.com (free)
http://koreanclass101.com (pay but very, very worth it; rivals Rosetta Stone but not nearly as expensive)
http://busyatom.com (free)
http://talktomeinkorean.com (free)
http://youtube.com/talktomeinkorean (free)
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Korean (free)
http://freelanguage.org (free)
http://korean-flashcards.com (free)
http://sayjack.com (free)

I cannot express to you how much the 1 site that I mentioned above that you have to pay for is worth it. It's an extensive site and the forums are very active. Also, the site is interactive and the lessons are quite effective and portions of each lesson are downloadable. I also really love Busy Atom on youtube, as well as on his own website. I've learned a lot of helpful information from all of the sites above.

Here are some other sites someone mentioned. I am leaving the comments the original poster made, but I cannot vouch for them:

http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.… (That is my favourite download course: mp3s and pdf).
www.byki.com (byki lite is free download, just type your email address, and uncheck both boxes).
http://langintro.com/kintro/ (cool downloads).
www.loecsen.com/ (Online flash cards are free, but not the rest of the site). *
http://mylanguages.org/learn_korean.php (I love that one, it also gives the alphabet and the hangeul alphabet Youtube videos on the sites. You can also download the mp3s this a a beginner's short course).
http://lifeinkorea.com/language/korean.c
http://www.openculture.com/freelanguagel… (Podcast: Kimchi, as the other is not free).
http://www.unification.org/ucbooks/kintr
http://rbi.kbs.co.kr/learn_korean/lesson
http://korean.sogang.ac.kr/ (Beginner an intermediate levels are covered).
http://www.arts.monash.edu.au/korean/kle… (Free textbooks downloads).
http://learnkoreanlanguage.com/learn-kor… (free beginner's lessons only).
http://learnkorean.com/home/index.asp
http://letslearnkorean.com/

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Postby Viande » Sun Mar 13, 2011 11:17 am

Thank you Arev! That's a lot of links to check. :)

Now if I could download some free time too...

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Postby Arev » Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:09 pm

Lol :D . You are right; that is a lot of links. I just figured I would share what I was aware of for whoever is interested. Happy clicking!

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Postby howtwosavealif3 » Tue Jun 21, 2011 2:18 pm

really useful links here;
http://forum.koohii.com/viewtopic.php?id=7211

including how to find scripts to dramas.

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Postby Tai » Tue Jun 21, 2011 4:12 pm

I'm in full agreement with Ethlenn. I would even say that whatever language you want learn, you need to know the letters and how to use their numbers. It may be hard at first, but you will never really get there other wise. Alphabet, numbers and time. Then just start with small sentences you will use many times over. Ask a friend who speaks Korean "what are the most important sentences" I need to date your sister and you will get a response.
I learned a good bit of spanish by reading the mexican comics or novelas. with a little dictionary. They are short and fun and use words that are used alot. Of course, spanish and english have the same letters. So with Japanese, Hebrew and Korean learning the letters is huge, even if you just want to speak or understand yer favorite movie. You won't be dancin in the dark.
Just like Michelle in Gisaeng Tales( I know the writers thought they were being funny with her scenes) all she could do is try her best and unlike in the show, most people will respect you for putting your best foot up front and try to help you. [ "My gawd, how could he date someone with blue eyes!!!??"] Many have the impression that Korean people are rude or even mean spirited. However, if they would just only 'scratch the surface' these detractors would find quite the opposite! Korean people are the best, warm, fun and make the best friends one could ever want. I say this because it is not just the movies, learning korean will give you much reward and fun. And there is the "coolness factor."

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Postby Ethlenn » Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:48 pm

You are right, Tai^^
(on the side note: writers in Gisaeng... are really gifted - they introduced Michelle who has no knowledge on Korea, and has apparently no interest in deepening it. She's shallow, happy to make a trip and barge in someone else's house violating the basic rules of manners. But then we got Kyle, who is versed in Korean language and customs. So the writers showed two sides of the same thing - you can be either ignorant and happy to be an ignorant, or you can put some effort and be treated as the equal.)

And to all wanting to learn Korean (or any other language), trust me, even after watching 200 dramas and movies and listening to music 24/7, in half a year you won't be able to translate a magazine article. Without proper classes or studying by yourself, but studying the grammar patterns and vocabulary, there is no way on earth one can master the language.
I'm not saying this because I doubt someone. One may pick up few words or sentences from dramas/movies. These are called "language patterns", and are easiest to learn in this way exactly. But I guarantee that no one can learn language fully only by watching TV.

Some of my students are just in the middle of basic language course - and they make a mistake some other people make - instead of mastering the basics, they want to know how to say: "In 60's the whole world was swept by sexual revolution, putting feminist, gender and gay criticism in the spotlight". And their full capacity is saying:"When I have the time I'd like to go where the sea is blue and you can drink Pina Colada on the beach".
You can't jump over some part of the language just because it's uninteresting, boring, tedious, dull, but you have to go through it.
I could write them the sentences they want to say, but what's the point? They will learn it by heart and then what? They won't be able to ask about directions in some city, because they found "right", "left", "across" too plain and boring.
"Particles in Japanese and Korean? Nah, screw it! I won't use them!"
Oh, really? Then you won't understand any given article in the newspaper or on the website.

Learning a language is not only fun parts (kyaa, so now I can write "I love you" on my backpack!!") but also the essential parts - those that will support the whole language structure. It's like building a house - you can't build a house without foundations, right? Even though they are not visible and cute.

Oh yes, I can be b*tchy.
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Greetings

Postby asijach » Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:54 am

I'm new on this site, seeking to learn Korean language because I LOVE them.

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Postby tofumama » Thu Sep 29, 2011 6:36 pm

Childhoodless wrote:Now, don't quote me on this. In fact, those who are more fluent than I am, chime in if I'm wrong (this is one of many words that I'm stil confused with).

But I recall learning that "dangshin," while meaning "you" in terms of affection, it can also be used to mean "you" in an almost derogatory context, like when you're arguing with someone. I don't reallly hear it used in a more casual sense between random people.


That's correct. I've only heard it used in three different ways.
1. Affectionate term to address your spouse (second person pronoun). But use "yuhbo" when you are first getting their attention. For example, "Yuhbo" is used like "hey you" and 'dangshin" is "you" in all other sense.
The informal version of this would be "jagi."

2. To sarcastically address someone (usually a stranger) you are arguing with. (second person pronoun)

3. To respectfully address someone in the third person.

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Postby Neliets » Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:11 pm

tofumama wrote:
Childhoodless wrote:Now, don't quote me on this. In fact, those who are more fluent than I am, chime in if I'm wrong (this is one of many words that I'm stil confused with).

But I recall learning that "dangshin," while meaning "you" in terms of affection, it can also be used to mean "you" in an almost derogatory context, like when you're arguing with someone. I don't reallly hear it used in a more casual sense between random people.


That's correct. I've only heard it used in three different ways.
1. Affectionate term to address your spouse (second person pronoun). But use "yuhbo" when you are first getting their attention. For example, "Yuhbo" is used like "hey you" and 'dangshin" is "you" in all other sense.
The informal version of this would be "jagi."

2. To sarcastically address someone (usually a stranger) you are arguing with. (second person pronoun)

3. To respectfully address someone in the third person.

Not seeing the issue here :?

There are no secret meanings.
1) Yeobeo(not sure how it's spelled though, but I think I got it right) and jagi are just words used in couples(married or unmarried ones). Like in English you could use Sweety, Darling etc. Those are synonyms w/o any big meaning to them.

2) Dangsin is totally different, though. There is only one explanation - it means "you" formally(basically, when talking/writing in Korean, you will always have to use Dangsin because Neo is used only between very, very close friends/family members(siblings), or someone way younger than you or much lower status than you).

Dangsin doesn't have any sarcastic meaning, there is nothing else, really.

And, to adress someone in 3rd person, they don't use Dangsin(because it means You), but you use "i bun"(means - this person)/"keu bun"(that person) and few others you don't need to know at first.

And about arguing and using Dangsin - Koreans are well enough mannered people so they keep using formal speech even when they argue(not always, of course) so it isn't used sarcastically. And, as you may guessed already, to someone completely unknown you won't use informal speech, so you use formal).

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Postby nancy39 » Sat Jan 21, 2012 12:09 pm

the best way to learn korean is through the web its easy and safe with no money involved in it. Also the sites like these help you in learning

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Learning Korean.

Postby lovablegal21 » Sat Feb 04, 2012 8:59 am

I have been studying Korean for 2 years already yet I am still not that fluent in it. Just normal questions okay but writing or explaining too long is beyond my abilities. Is there any korean pen pal website where I can converse with a Korean directly?

I think the environment is a big key. Becoz we dont usually practise Korean so even after we have learnt, its difficult to improve much or to use it.. hais.

dalsignum
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I want to learn KOREAN language

Postby dalsignum » Sat Nov 10, 2012 6:22 pm

is anyone in here interested to teach me korean language? i know already the basic on how to read...

i want to learn hangul that bad... hehe :D

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Postby neomonolith » Sat Nov 10, 2012 7:20 pm

how did you learn to read it on your own?? I just started and have no clue how to go about learning

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Postby dalsignum » Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:16 am

there's that Ebook that i have read on how to read hangul that's why i know how to read but i don't know the meaning of the sentence of what i have read...

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Postby nangelique » Wed Dec 19, 2012 7:40 am

Hello! I'm only new to the site and also new at learning Korean.

I've been doing the Pimsleur units. I've torrented the full version and I'm really excited to get through all of them. I know it's gonna take a long time though. I do about 30-mins to 1 hour of the Pimsleur units a day and it's going pretty well.
I have an app on my iPhone called "iStart Korean". There's a lite version but I got the full version which cost a bit. It was good at first but I found that right now the Pimsleur units suit me more at the moment cause I'm a bit busy.

However, I agree that in order to really become fluent and in order to really understand the language, you have to know the basics... Like the particles and sentence patterns. I study Japanese at school and this is one of the key things they emphasise - the grammar/sentence patterns and all the little particles and the other little details we need to construct proper sentences. Also, practicing the language through conversation regularly will help too. (:

Also, my Japanese teacher suggested reading the lyrics of songs - both translations. It helps with building up vocabulary.

I hope this helped anyone out there. Otherwise, it's great to see so many people wanting to learn the Korean language like me here.

:D :D :D :cheers: :salut:

Edit: Also, another thing that helps me is studying the Korean culture as well. I'm trying to watch documentaries and also I'm learning how to cook Korean dishes! It keeps me interested and excited in learning Korean. :)

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Postby alexk777 » Sun Dec 22, 2013 1:42 am

I have decided i am going to learn korean. I happen to watch korean drama by accident last month , until then i never even know where is korea in map.

Also i find korean and tamil words matching like more than 500. Mostly i like the sound of korean language and also i am exploring.

Learning japanese may be benefit , but learning korean more for my own enthusiasm and i like the sound.

I also like korean cute drama actress. :)

Moon chae won is goddess. :)

MemeX
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korean novels ebooks?

Postby MemeX » Tue Aug 19, 2014 12:51 pm

Can does someone have access to or can help me find or point me to some Korean ebook novels, I can't find anything modern with counterparts in English for parallel reading for my kindle..
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Postby jecartas » Fri Dec 05, 2014 7:43 am

Hi, I've started a blog about expressions, idioms, slang etc that I come across in Kdramas, http://korean-idioms-in-drama.blogspot.com/ I'm basically using it to track things and remember them better, but I thought maybe somebody here will find it useful. I've started with Boys over flowers (because it has lot of funny stuff thanks to Junpyo *^.~*) and Only you (because I have a reliable script from a textbook ^.^)
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