New to fansubbing

For questions on the technical aspects about how to fansub. Come on, share those pearls of wisdom!
Tarlius
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat May 08, 2010 2:43 am
Location: Japan

New to fansubbing

Postby Tarlius » Mon May 10, 2010 2:41 pm

Hey all, I been lurking in the background downloading dramas from here for a while, would first like to say thanks for all the work you guys have put in to the community be it admining the site, uploading the raws, providing the subs or whatever.
Getting my drama fix has been so much easier since I found this site, and I'm sure my Japanese has improved from it. :salut:

I've been studying Japanese for a few years and thinking about translation at some point when my Japanese improves but haven't really tried translating anything before (outside of classes), so I thought maybe I could try fansubbing.
Anyway, got a few questions.

Firstly, I was wondering how most translators translate?
At the moment I'm trying it with notepad on one side of the screen and video on the other and sorta draft it as the video plays, but I figure that maybe that'd be a bit tough for a timer to figure out? I've had a play with Aegisub but adding new lines seems to be a bit tedious since it stops the video, and looking at how teams are normally put together that seems to be what a timer would do?

What do timers normally expect to receive from a translator? (Or what do translators normally send to timers?)

Like, in my head I see two possible ways.
-An .srt file that has everything in order but all at like 0.0.0s or kinda near-ish the right place or something, or
-A .txt file with each line translated for the timer to copy and paste from.
Unless maybe "guess" timing is done first, then a .srt with rough timings is sent to a translator to fill in then back to a timer to clean up? It could be that different groups all have their own way, but what do your groups do?


Also, are subtitles in Japanese easily available? I find it much easier to deal with written Japanese than spoken Japanese, and of course the timings would be mostly done then... I read in one post (no idea which thread) while hunting for tips/etc that the Japanese broadcast's subtitles "channel" can be captured with the video (as simple text, not from separating it from the picture), but I haven't seen a raw come with them (most raws are .avi, which isn't a container format afaik?)


Finally, is there a list maintained somewhere around here that shows which dramas haven't got translations (/pending translations)? I've a few I'm watching at the moment, but they all have subs in the works already and "competing" is just a waste of peoples' time (and prolly not a good way to make friends :whistling:) I figure if I'm gonna play around I might as well play with a drama nobody else is doing.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

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jinx143
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Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2007 2:26 am
Location: Phils.

Postby jinx143 » Mon May 10, 2010 5:25 pm

Hi! I'm not a translator but i'm a fansubber so i think i will be able to give you some pointers...

What do timers normally expect to receive from a translator? (Or what do translators normally send to timers?)

Like, in my head I see two possible ways.
-An .srt file that has everything in order but all at like 0.0.0s or kinda near-ish the right place or something, or
-A .txt file with each line translated for the timer to copy and paste from.
Unless maybe "guess" timing is done first, then a .srt with rough timings is sent to a translator to fill in then back to a timer to clean up? It could be that different groups all have their own way, but what do your groups do?


Our translators from TimeLesSub usually translates using the timed file. Once the video is out, the timer will download it and do the rough timing [sometimes we call it ghost timing or guess timing just like what you said]. The translator will use this pre-timed file to translate the whole drama. I guess it's much easier for them to translate. After translation, the file will be send back to the timer for fine timing.

But in some fansubs, they translate first before timing. Fansubs have diff. ways of doing things. And it depends on the translator w/c way he/she is comfortable with.

Also, are subtitles in Japanese easily available? I find it much easier to deal with written Japanese than spoken Japanese, and of course the timings would be mostly done then... I read in one post (no idea which thread) while hunting for tips/etc that the Japanese broadcast's subtitles "channel" can be captured with the video (as simple text, not from separating it from the picture), but I haven't seen a raw come with them (most raws are .avi, which isn't a container format afaik?)


I'm not sure abt it. I only know of chinese captions can be available sometimes.

Finally, is there a list maintained somewhere around here that shows which dramas haven't got translations (/pending translations)? I've a few I'm watching at the moment, but they all have subs in the works already and "competing" is just a waste of peoples' time (and prolly not a good way to make friends Whistling) I figure if I'm gonna play around I might as well play with a drama nobody else is doing.


Just check the fansub map here: http://fansub.d-addicts.com/Jdrama_Fansub_Map
You'll know from there if there's a fansub group working on a certain drama or none. You can check also the subtitles index.

One more thing, be specific when translating the onscreen signs. This is for the use of the typesetter 'coz not all typesetter can read kanji or japanese characters. As a typesetter myself, i want to put the english translation on top or below the japanese word. Sometimes there are lots of kanji characters on screen and i can't read them, so i don't know how to place them.

But this is only for the hardsubbed videos. If you'll just release a softsub, typesetter is not needed and you can just translate the onscreen signs.

Hope i was able to help you with this.

Btw, you might want to join our fansub group, you'll be most welcome :)
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Chuks
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Location: USA
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Postby Chuks » Mon May 10, 2010 5:54 pm

qop123 has been providing Japanese subs to "handlers."
http://fansub.d-addicts.com/Qop123%27s_ ... es_Project

Joining a fansub group is the easiest way to start.
If you are not perfect with Japanese, there will be time when you can't
figure out how to translate.
But if you're in a group, other translators will help you out.
You also don't need to time since they got a timer for you.
Many fansub groups are looking for Japanese translators.

One more thing.
Be sure to pick a drama you like, otherwise it would be a pain to finish
subbing all episodes.

Tarlius
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat May 08, 2010 2:43 am
Location: Japan

Postby Tarlius » Tue May 11, 2010 3:14 am

I thought I was maybe thinking too much with so many ways, and that ghost timing was prolly just extra work, but actually it seems I was pretty close to the mark :roll

jinx143 wrote:Just check the fansub map here: http://fansub.d-addicts.com/Jdrama_Fansub_Map
You'll know from there if there's a fansub group working on a certain drama or none. You can check also the subtitles index.

Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for. :-)

jinx143 wrote:But this is only for the hardsubbed videos. If you'll just release a softsub, typesetter is not needed and you can just translate the onscreen signs.

I'm not really too clued up on what can and can't be done with each sub format yet, but isn't a hardsub essentially just a .ass "burned" into a raw, with perhaps a group logo watermarked in (I know SARS does)?

Thanks very much for your input, it was very helpful, and gave a nice insight into how it works. I've read all the stickies (I think, do slap if I ask something in a sticky ><), but some are a bit aged, and I haven't really seen a indepth description of what is expected of each "role".


Chuks wrote:qop123 has been providing Japanese subs to "handlers."
http://fansub.d-addicts.com/Qop123%27s_ ... es_Project
Thats a nice start, but not quite what I was looking for. I was wondering if there was a site in Japanese with a more thorough listing or something. I read that some of the raws are actually moved over from Japanese sites/file-sharing circles for example, and wondered if there was a similar place to go for Japanese subtitles. I guess its pretty likely that cap'ing the subtitles is the last thing on a Japanese cap'ers mind though :roll


Chuks wrote:One more thing.
Be sure to pick a drama you like, otherwise it would be a pain to finish
subbing all episodes.

This is something that worries me tbh. If I like it at the start, maybe I'll hate it after I've watched that one scene with that one badly pronounced word that really needs looking up for the scene to make sense 867381 times ><
Which is why I was wondering about Japanese subs.

Thanks for your input, Chuks :thumleft:



I'm not so sure about joining a group. Of course in a group there's support, but it also means there's a bit more pressure :unsure: If its just me and I have a slow week, its only me that has to put up with the flak, you know? Although looking back I think most groups are used to translators having slow weeks...
How do most groups collaborate? I'm guessing irc plays a fair part, but when the team is spread across timezones files get..emailed?

What dramas are you looking for translators for?


By the way, is it possible to release one .ass with 2 or 3 sets of subs in it? Like how .mkv can hold an English and Japanese subtitle "track" (is track the correct term for that?). I always thought it'd be nice if sometimes a literal translation and the original Japanese was included as a "learning tool" or something.

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kiramethyst
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Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2008 6:08 am

Postby kiramethyst » Thu May 13, 2010 3:39 pm

I have a couple of suggestions.

1. Find a timer who can understand some Japanese.
2. Label the dialogue like a play's script. I used to do that.

As for the Japanese subtitles, they are actually closed captions given by the broadcasters and they have to be captured directly from the broadcast. The timings are done by the kind soul who uploaded them (refer to Chuks' reply) but they aren't always good and they leave out signs and various screen texts since they are meant for the hearing impaired. So you would have to add them in yourselves.

If you want to play around and a hang of translating dramas, why don't you try drama specials? They are short (anything from 1-4 episodes) and not many people translate them. I'm not referring to normal 11-episode dramas that have specials (e.g. Code Blue, Rookies). I'm referring to stand-alone drama specials. The fansub map should turn up a lot of unsubbed ones from years past.

Tarlius
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat May 08, 2010 2:43 am
Location: Japan

Postby Tarlius » Tue May 18, 2010 3:21 am

I think I know what you mean by drama specials, and that seems like a pretty good place to start. I'll have a look later, if there's a lot like you say I should be able to find one I like :)


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