Let's learn Japanese....

Talk about the culture and entertainment from Nihon.
torerling
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Postby torerling » Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:28 pm

Riee109 wrote:And I just said that I've heard that finnish sounds really hard.
That wasn't an accusation at all!
Furthermore I know that you only said that you don't know any language " that's as extreme as japanese.. "

You took that quote out of context, with regards to cutting out a lot of words japanese is the one I find most extreme, you can't have read my posts very well if you didn't get that..

Riee109 wrote:I've actually read all your replies really closely and you said "[...]And I am learning Japanese, that's the main ones, and that's the ones I use, and the ones I one day hope to make my bread and butter of. "
If you really want to do a job, where high language skills in japanese are necessary, then I think you should rather focus on studying japanese instead of the basics of serveral other languages. I really have no doubt that you already might have excellent skills in this language but you can always improve. Especially because the japanese language has so many difficult and specific words...
Well, if you are already able to read the keizai part of a japanese newspaper without looking up a single word, than this of course doesn't count for you.

How the ... can you say anything about what languages I do learn now from my posts here? I work about 6-7 hours with japanese each day, and I do not learn any other ones now, if you are psycic you are a really bad one.
Japanese is no diffrent from any other language in having specific words though.
well it seems like you aren't able to do other things than skim english before accusing people for doing wrong thing anyway so I don't see why I really do care about your post, but I hate it when people come with ad homonym and non seqitour attacks out of the blue..

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XiaoPauli
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Postby XiaoPauli » Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:52 pm

You seem angry, torerling.

torerling
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Postby torerling » Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:56 pm

XiaoPauli wrote:You seem angry, torerling.
Sorry Pauli, *sigh* I'm just tired of people misqouting me and making strawmen, Especially when we all should talk about something I/we really like.. *hug*

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XiaoPauli
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Postby XiaoPauli » Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:19 pm

torerling wrote:
XiaoPauli wrote:You seem angry, torerling.
Sorry Pauli, *sigh* I'm just tired of people misqouting me and making strawmen, Especially when we all should talk about something I/we really like.. *hug*

Yeah, I can understand. I shoulder most of the blame because I started some of it with my misunderstanding, and definitely owe you an apology for taking your post out of context earlier.

Despite how difficult Japanese can be, I've always had a great sense of joy when I look back at the progress I make every month. I bet everyone else has had too, and they can probably attest that they had a great feeling and no regrets about studying Japanese. I can't wait to hear more stories of how people studied for their JLPTs. This is a great thread to share our experiences too. :D

torerling
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Postby torerling » Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:25 pm

XiaoPauli wrote:
torerling wrote:
XiaoPauli wrote:You seem angry, torerling.
Sorry Pauli, *sigh* I'm just tired of people misqouting me and making strawmen, Especially when we all should talk about something I/we really like.. *hug*

Yeah, I can understand. I shoulder most of the blame because I started some of it with my misunderstanding, and definitely owe you an apology for taking your post out of context earlier.

Despite how difficult Japanese can be, I've always had a great sense of joy when I look back at the progress I make every month. I can't wait to hear more stories of how people studied for their JLPTs. This is a great thread to share our experiences too. :D

It's OK, I do it myself far too often, I know most of guys/gals here, and most that really are japanese has to be nice guys, it takes some guts taking up as big a task as learning a new language.
yeah, I too look back each week one new chapter in genki, each week a lot of new words, and things seem a bit clearer, coming to japan this fal will probably speed things up a bit more, whoa, If my head doesn't explode before 3-4 more years of this I'm going to be better at japanese than english ;)

paramaya
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Postby paramaya » Fri Apr 25, 2008 7:27 am

lincorp.com wrote:Here is a link to some practice tests from previous years. You can use this as a tool to judge which level you should take. Also there is a big jump from level 3 and level 2 so make sure youre ready. Based on the feedback we receive after administering the test every year, most test takers (in the US) complain about the big jump in difficulty. Just an FYI.

http://www.jflalc.org/index.php?act=tpt&id=21


thanks for the link i'm about to check it out..

Ayumi_Pi
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Postby Ayumi_Pi » Wed Apr 30, 2008 11:58 am

Hi everyone!
I decided just a few month ago that I'm going to learn japanese so I'm really glad I found this thread. I have learned a lot from your posts.
Thanx

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~kani~
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Postby ~kani~ » Fri May 02, 2008 1:21 pm

I envy you people, you have time to study only japanese...
I'd like to spent more time with it, but I have to study english, swedish and german at school =/ well, actually I am not so sad since it's cool to know how to speak those languages...

has anyone notice the same thing as me? last year I wasn't very good at listening tests in those languages I study. (especially english was difficult). but after studying japanese and watching a lot of subtitiled dramas and starting fan subbing, I am suddenly quite good at listening tests. o.O And japanese even isn't so hard for me to listen because it's mostly pronounced in the same way than my native, Finnish.

I wonder why so many people say that japanese is difficult... (humm maybe not here but I often read that kind of opinions) For example german is more difficult with all those genders and conjucations. there even aren't any articles in japanese! (just did a pile of english article exercises). and it's written and pronounced in the same way - what can be easier? ^^ the hardest thing is to learn how to write ;P Maybe I think this way now, when I haven't studied japanese long enough to understand how many difficult grammatical points there are.... because with english I everyday notice something new~

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Postby thbirdman » Fri May 02, 2008 1:51 pm

~kani~ wrote:I envy you people, you have time to study only japanese...
I'd like to spent more time with it, but I have to study english, swedish and german at school =/ well, actually I am not so sad since it's cool to know how to speak those languages...

has anyone notice the same thing as me? last year I wasn't very good at listening tests in those languages I study. (especially english was difficult). but after studying japanese and watching a lot of subtitiled dramas and starting fan subbing, I am suddenly quite good at listening tests. o.O And japanese even isn't so hard for me to listen because it's mostly pronounced in the same way than my native, Finnish.

I wonder why so many people say that japanese is difficult... (humm maybe not here but I often read that kind of opinions) For example german is more difficult with all those genders and conjucations. there even aren't any articles in japanese! (just did a pile of english article exercises). and it's written and pronounced in the same way - what can be easier? ^^ the hardest thing is to learn how to write ;P Maybe I think this way now, when I haven't studied japanese long enough to understand how many difficult grammatical points there are.... because with english I everyday notice something new~


I beleive what makes Japanese hard to learn, at least for english speakers, is the fact that the sentence structure is pretty different. You almost have to change the way you think about the sentence to understand the Japanese. Also there is the difference of changing the form of a word in Japanese vs adding a new word in English. For example: He runs. vs He can run. 彼は走る。彼は走れる。Its different to think about making a verb potential instead of adding in a different word to make the sentence potential. Though I believe the biggest hurdle in learning Japanese is kanji.

torerling
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Postby torerling » Fri May 02, 2008 2:57 pm

~kani~ wrote:I envy you people, you have time to study only japanese...
I'd like to spent more time with it, but I have to study english, swedish and german at school =/ well, actually I am not so sad since it's cool to know how to speak those languages...

That's kind of what I did too, the time comes when you get to go the university and then you get better time to concentrate in one language.

~kani~ wrote:has anyone notice the same thing as me? last year I wasn't very good at listening tests in those languages I study. (especially english was difficult). but after studying japanese and watching a lot of subtitiled dramas and starting fan subbing, I am suddenly quite good at listening tests. o.O And japanese even isn't so hard for me to listen because it's mostly pronounced in the same way than my native, Finnish.

The thing is that you get better at recognizing words and parts, it usually gets better the more words you know, and more languages = more words ;) That's my theory at least. The thing that usually is hard when listening to japanese is that it some times is hard to find where the words separate, but that has more to do with me having a quite small vocabulary ;)


~kani~ wrote:I wonder why so many people say that japanese is difficult... (humm maybe not here but I often read that kind of opinions) For example german is more difficult with all those genders and conjucations. there even aren't any articles in japanese! (just did a pile of english article exercises). and it's written and pronounced in the same way - what can be easier? ^^ the hardest thing is to learn how to write ;P Maybe I think this way now, when I haven't studied japanese long enough to understand how many difficult grammatical points there are.... because with english I everyday notice something new~

The thing about japanese being hard is that it is so different, you don't have any places to hang words at first, the structure is different, the way you say things are pretty different, but more or less like a normal language after what I think, to learn to write isn't so difficult, it only takes a big amount of time and patience.
And japanese don't have articles, but you have particles, and it's more or less the same, some words take some particles and others other, so It's not that easy that way. And you shouldn't underestimate the politeness things either, at least I tend to mix them up when getting stressed.. But all in all, more or less like learning another language, but if you think japanese is easy you should try mandarin or spanish, and you'll see how much easier they are..

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~kani~
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Postby ~kani~ » Fri May 02, 2008 6:06 pm

torerling wrote:The thing about japanese being hard is that it is so different, you don't have any places to hang words at first, the structure is different, the way you say things are pretty different, but more or less like a normal language after what I think, to learn to write isn't so difficult, it only takes a big amount of time and patience.
And japanese don't have articles, but you have particles, and it's more or less the same, some words take some particles and others other, so It's not that easy that way. And you shouldn't underestimate the politeness things either, at least I tend to mix them up when getting stressed.. But all in all, more or less like learning another language, but if you think japanese is easy you should try mandarin or spanish, and you'll see how much easier they are..


oh, yeah, particles~ =.='' x)
and politeness, yes ^^ though in normal life you need just -masu level with foreigners and dictionary form-level with friends. (this is my opinion, maybe I am wrong... huh I am somehow scared to post here because here are so many people who know so much about japanese o.o)

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Postby torerling » Fri May 02, 2008 9:02 pm

~kani~ wrote:oh, yeah, particles~ =.='' x)
and politeness, yes ^^ though in normal life you need just -masu level with foreigners and dictionary form-level with friends. (this is my opinion, maybe I am wrong... huh I am somehow scared to post here because here are so many people who know so much about japanese o.o)

That really depends on what you're going to do with the language, and if you're ever going to a resturant or to a store to buy something, they will probably talk to you in keigo, so it's a good practice to know at least a bit of it.

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Postby ~kani~ » Fri May 02, 2008 9:20 pm

torerling wrote:
~kani~ wrote:oh, yeah, particles~ =.='' x)
and politeness, yes ^^ though in normal life you need just -masu level with foreigners and dictionary form-level with friends. (this is my opinion, maybe I am wrong... huh I am somehow scared to post here because here are so many people who know so much about japanese o.o)

That really depends on what you're going to do with the language, and if you're ever going to a resturant or to a store to buy something, they will probably talk to you in keigo, so it's a good practice to know at least a bit of it.


you are right as always =)

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AngelicLayer
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Postby AngelicLayer » Wed May 07, 2008 5:10 pm

is anyone so nice please to translate this for me :

さっきまで新曲のプリプロをやってました!
んでいまから朝までリハです。

ん~熱下がんないから薬飲みまくってたら胃が痛くて気持ち悪くなってきた(ノ_・。)

そんな事より新曲がいい感じに仕上がってきたから完成が楽しみで仕方ないヾ( ´ー`)
_____________

風邪っぽい!
まぢ体中痛くて死にそうや
熱が39.1℃もある…
明日プリプロなのに今の状態だと動けないし

今日中に治って

__________

新しいピックがやっと届いた~(=^▽^=)

まっ、ただ前回のピックの黒バージョンなだけなんだが(*゜▽゜ノノ゛☆


今日もリハだ~♪
曲作り急ピッチで仕上げないとね!!
朝まで頑張ってこ



thanks a lot in advance :3 i ll appreciate a lot !^^ < 3

rnneko
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Postby rnneko » Wed May 07, 2008 11:05 pm

What Japanese-English, English-Japanese dictionary should I get?

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requiem
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Postby requiem » Sun May 11, 2008 2:22 pm

AngelicLayer wrote:is anyone so nice please to translate this for me :

さっきまで新曲のプリプロをやってました!
I was recently mixing a new song!

んでいまから朝までリハです。
From now till morning is rehearsal.

ん~熱下がんないから薬飲みまくってたら胃が痛くて気持ち悪くなってきた(ノ_・。)
Hmmm...I thought I had a fever, but when I took medicine my stomach hurt and I was miserable.

そんな事より新曲がいい感じに仕上がってきたから完成が楽しみで仕方ないヾ( ´ー`)
Other than that, because the song has some great finishing touches, there's nothing fun I can do to complete it.

____________

風邪っぽい!
It's like a cold!

まぢ体中痛くて死にそうや
It really hurts, I feel like I'm going to die...

熱が39.1℃もある…
I also have a fever of 39.1 C (about 102.3 F)

明日プリプロなのに今の状態だと動けないし
Although I'll mix tomorrow, with my current status I can't even move, so...

今日中に治って
During the day I'll get better.
__________

新しいピックがやっと届いた~(=^▽^=)
A new (pikku?) has finally arrived!

まっ、ただ前回のピックの黒バージョンなだけなんだが(*゜▽゜ノノ゛☆
Well, it's only the last time's black version of pikku.

今日もリハだ~♪
Today as well I have rehearsal.

曲作り急ピッチで仕上げないとね!!
It's hard to fine tune when making songs at such a quick pace!!

朝まで頑張ってこ
I'll keep doing my best till the morning!


Consider this a really loose, yet literal translation.
(Now I understand what sort of hell fansubbers go through sometimes...)
I also do not know what プリプロ (puripuro) is, but after doing some googling and, judging by the writing here, I would say it has something to do with "recording or mixing electronic music."

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Postby mizune » Sun May 11, 2008 2:34 pm

requiem wrote:I also do not know what プリプロ (puripuro) is, but after doing some googling and, judging by the writing here, I would say it has something to do with "recording or mixing electronic music."

I think it's an abbreviation for "preproduction"
Read the D-Addicts FAQ before asking questions.
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Postby paramaya » Mon May 12, 2008 1:41 pm

rnneko wrote:What Japanese-English, English-Japanese dictionary should I get?


you should check this link: http://www.physics.ucla.edu/%7Egrosenth/japanese.html. besides dictionaries, there are also some grammar books suggested and some other japanese-related books and reading materials you may find useful or interesting.

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AngelicLayer
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Postby AngelicLayer » Mon May 12, 2008 2:00 pm

thanks a lot to requiem, mizune !!! I appreciate a lot !

@paramaya : thank u for the site !

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Translation pl0x

Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Tue May 13, 2008 6:07 am

Can somebody help me conjugate さらう into the て command form? さらて? And it means "run away with", right? So...

せんせい、私とさらて。おきなわにいきましょう。
(Sensei, run away with me. Let's go to Okinawa.)

Is that right?
ありません

zenitse
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Postby zenitse » Tue May 13, 2008 12:59 pm

The correct form is saratte.

I am not familiar with this particular word, but jisho.org says "to carry off; to run away with; to kidnap; to abduct".

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Postby canmield » Tue May 13, 2008 1:27 pm

攫って(さらって)is definitely what you are looking for in the verb form, but I think you also need to use を in place of the と:

先生、私をさらって。沖縄に行きましょう!

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Postby paramaya » Tue May 13, 2008 1:34 pm

@paramaya : thank u for the site !


Hai, doitashimashite. Actually I was in search for the best japanese-english dictionary to buy but was too shy to ask ppl here LOL. and still can't make time to get the book lately though I think I've found which one I should buy..., and my japanese lesson also has stopped for a while due to some Uni's stuffs. I think I'll still have months to prepare my JLPT this year after having those stuffs over. honestly I really hope I can pass level 2 then (too high expectation huh? :P). my problems so far are with Kanji and some grammars I have yet to know. I thought of starting with memorizing as many as words commonly used, Kanji after that. it may be better cuz you know, if I think like I am being the same as japanese children that only know Kanas at their early years plus speak the language itself with no Kanji knowledge, I can just associate the words which I already know and use in conversation with the Kanjis. could be easier that way. that's only my opinion and what I'm doing. good luck to me..! :roll

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Postby Egg-chan » Tue May 13, 2008 1:51 pm

For anyone who is looking for J-E E-J dictionaries and already own a DS, you can find DS ones for much cheaper than it would be to buy a regular dictionary.. plus, it has writing capabilities.. it's so nice! Here's the one I got:

http://www.play-asia.com/paOS-13-71-9g- ... -198v.html

You do have to have knowledge of hiragana and katakana.. and maybe basic knowledge of kanji.. but it's a dictionary, and it's got handwriting recognition.. only 50$.. I was lucky and I got it off Amazon for 40$.. anyway, that's a lot less than the $250+ you may be spending on a dictionary alone! (All DSes are region free, meaning you can buy games from anywhere and play them.. no special item is required to play Japanese games.)
Image XDImageXD

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Re: Translation pl0x

Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Tue May 13, 2008 2:39 pm

InTr4nceWeTrust wrote:Can somebody help me conjugate さらう into the て command form? さらて? And it means "run away with", right? So...

せんせい、私とさらて。おきなわにいきましょう。
(Sensei, run away with me. Let's go to Okinawa.)

Is that right?


merged with existing thread.

zenitse wrote:The correct form is saratte.

I am not familiar with this particular word, but jisho.org says "to carry off; to run away with; to kidnap; to abduct".


Oh all right. Thanks.

canmield wrote:攫って(さらって)is definitely what you are looking for in the verb form, but I think you also need to use を in place of the と:

先生、私をさらって。沖縄に行きましょう!


Why を?
ありません

paramaya
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Postby paramaya » Tue May 13, 2008 2:51 pm

Why を?


makes sense if it was meant 'kidnap/abduct me' instead of 'run away with me'. shiranai.

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Postby canmield » Tue May 13, 2008 3:41 pm

paramaya wrote:makes sense if it was meant 'kidnap/abduct me' instead of 'run away with me'. shiranai.


It does mean abduct/kidnap, but the nuance is a bit more like nab or snatch away, but you would be the object.

Alternatives:

~を連れて逃げる This is a bit more like take me with you, and then you could just add 沖縄に to that sentence and drop the first one.

~と一緒に逃げる This is pretty literal. Run away together.

~と駆け落ちする Finally, this is, um actually eloping, so it really depends on what the circumstances are.

Of course in all three of these cases you are losing the -て command form of the verb, but if you use -ましょう, you still are in that grey area that could be called an imperative command. (maybe?)

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Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Tue May 13, 2008 3:45 pm

Hm...could I get those in hiragana? My kanji is terrible. Thanks ^_^

edit: is this right?

を連れて逃げる - をつれてにげる
と一緒に逃げる - と いっしょ に にげる
と駆け落ちする - と かけおち する
ありません

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Postby canmield » Tue May 13, 2008 4:16 pm

You got it... I've been meaning to ask what you are going to use this for. I wasn't sure if I wanted to know, but I'm gonna ask anyway.

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Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Tue May 13, 2008 4:21 pm

Thanks. hahah. My goal every day is to make my hot Japanese teacher as uncomfortable as possible ^_^" と かけおち する seems like the one to go with. lol. are those three conjugated tho? they seem to be in dictionary form?
ありません

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Postby canmield » Tue May 13, 2008 4:55 pm

I was afraid of something like that.

I can help you conjugate if you give me her phone number so I can, um... apologize for helping you with this... email address works too, and msn if you've got it.

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Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Tue May 13, 2008 5:30 pm

oh ok sounds good. here's her number. but if her husband picks up, dont worry. he's a really small guy.

...lol...

Anyways. 私とかけおちしましょう。 Right? I don't really mind it being a bit commanding.

と一緒に逃げる also seems to work but could you explain いっしょ? And would it be 私といっしょににげりまっしょ?

I'd actually like it to be commanding. せんせい、 私とにげて。おきなわにいきまっしょ。 Would that be all right?
ありません

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Postby canmield » Tue May 13, 2008 6:17 pm

Married? What? That doesn't matter since I'm apologizing anyway, right? Where's her number dammit? I mean, uh, could you send that again?

Oh well I'm not going to teach you to make it sound more commanding than that. There's a word for that form I learned in linguistics class, but I've forgotten it and I don't feel like digging through notes now to find it. What's usually called a command form usually sounds more like a demand.

I can't think of a middle ground. Maybe someone can come up with something in between, but all I can think of is more polite or softer ways of saying it.

Anyway, yes what you have written is grammatically correct. I'll not coment on the moral implications if she does in fact have a husband. And as an added bonus, at no extra charge I'm giving away a full disclaimer! Use at your own risk! Any and all bodily harm done to you is your own responsibility. I do not intend to be held accountable for any resulting reduction in your grade either.

Your second sentence should be 私といっしょににけましょう。

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Postby ryc3 » Tue May 13, 2008 8:09 pm



Arigatou Gozaimasu. I've been looking for a Eigo - Nihongo no jisho for sometime. I'm assuming it'lll teach me some basic strokes of kanji.

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Postby requiem » Tue May 13, 2008 9:31 pm

As an inspiration to those of you (like me) who are struggling to develop an affluency for Japanese, read the following website:

http://www.alljapaneseallthetime.com/blog/about

This guy grew up in America, never took a Japanese class, but in 2 years became entirely fluent (in fact, as he states better than some natives) in Japanese.
He also claims to have maintained a happy lifestyle, but I don't know how judging by the rigid study schedule he boasts of in his various postings.

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Postby ryc3 » Wed May 14, 2008 12:32 am

as much as I like watching drama and anime I doubt I'd learn to speak japanese. :\

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Postby requiem » Wed May 14, 2008 4:45 am

ryc3 wrote:as much as I like watching drama and anime I doubt I'd learn to speak japanese. :\


That's what I said when I started. :P
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Postby Egg-chan » Wed May 14, 2008 3:51 pm

ryc3 wrote:


Arigatou Gozaimasu. I've been looking for a Eigo - Nihongo no jisho for sometime. I'm assuming it'lll teach me some basic strokes of kanji.


Well, this is actually JUST a dictionary.. so it doesn't really teach you stroke order or anything.. however, there are plenty of Kanji games that you can find on Play-asia as well.
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Postby Erubey » Wed May 14, 2008 4:00 pm

InTr4nceWeTrust wrote:
I'd actually like it to be commanding. せんせい、 私とにげて。おきなわにいきまっしょ。 Would that be all right?


せんせい、おれとにげろ。おきなわにいこう!

That would solidify your manliness.


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Postby requiem » Wed May 14, 2008 4:08 pm

Erubey wrote:
InTr4nceWeTrust wrote:
I'd actually like it to be commanding. せんせい、 私とにげて。おきなわにいきまっしょ。 Would that be all right?


せんせい、おれとにげろ。おきなわにいこう!

That would solidify your manliness.


==
Uriel


To further add the "serious samurai feel," it might help to dramatize it a bit...

おい、おまえ・・・うんせんせい、おれさまとにげろ!コオリャア!おきなわへいこうぜ!

Disclaimer: Upon usage of this phrase to any respectable Japanese woman with authority, you will either be frowned upon for antagonizing Japanese with anime-slobber, or possibly surrendering yourself to the art of seppuku. You have been warned.

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Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Wed May 14, 2008 6:46 pm

hahahaha. I guess I meant request rather than a manly COMMAND. I'll stick with the "te" form.
ありません

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Postby ryc3 » Thu May 15, 2008 12:48 am

Egg-chan wrote:Well, this is actually JUST a dictionary.. so it doesn't really teach you stroke order or anything.. however, there are plenty of Kanji games that you can find on Play-asia as well.


hmm... If I remember yesterday.. it did showed me how to do a stroke order for a kanji. I didn't know what I did. :X I do however have an r4 which allows me to emulate ds games. I don't really buy my video games anymore. Unless it's really good that I must pick it up. Well.. if you can PM me with suggestions of games I'd be gladly to use them. :)

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Postby paramaya » Thu May 15, 2008 9:36 am

requiem wrote:
Erubey wrote:
InTr4nceWeTrust wrote:
I'd actually like it to be commanding. せんせい、 私とにげて。おきなわにいきまっしょ。 Would that be all right?


せんせい、おれとにげろ。おきなわにいこう!

That would solidify your manliness.


==
Uriel


To further add the "serious samurai feel," it might help to dramatize it a bit...

おい、おまえ・・・うんせんせい、おれさまとにげろ!コオリャア!おきなわへいこうぜ!

Disclaimer: Upon usage of this phrase to any respectable Japanese woman with authority, you will either be frowned upon for antagonizing Japanese with anime-slobber, or possibly surrendering yourself to the art of seppuku. You have been warned.


hi guys, those are what I've been looking for. I always wonder how my grammatical knowledge doesn't fit the lines. must be the form used in animes I watch thats different from whats being taught to me. do you have any links referring to those many conjugations?? I'd really love to imitate the way they say things it just sounds cool...like the one on quote above. OOkini... :salut:

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Postby rairai » Fri May 16, 2008 6:30 am

does anyone know any software/chip for nintendo ds wher i can learn japanese (in romaji).. i only found JE EJ dictionary but its in kanji.. thanks!

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Postby ryc3 » Fri May 16, 2008 6:57 am

rairai wrote:does anyone know any software/chip for nintendo ds wher i can learn japanese (in romaji).. i only found JE EJ dictionary but its in kanji.. thanks!


http://www.r4ds.com/index-en.htm That just allows you to play rom files. Just FYI

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Postby rairai » Fri May 16, 2008 7:05 am

ryc3: sory, m really not a techy person.. i checkd the link but i dont understand what it is.. :D
what im looking for is like a JE EJ dictionary but in romaji..

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Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Fri May 16, 2008 6:37 pm

Thanks for the help, canmield. Ultimately I decided not to be mean to her since the class is ending : /

Anybody know if へんじ can be applied to written things? Like...

あなたのてがみ?はい、へんじしました。
(no need for を, right? it's listed as a suru verb)

Or is it just for things that are spoken?
ありません

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Postby Erubey » Fri May 16, 2008 9:38 pm

It's for letters or emails as well. However, you wouldn't say へんじしました, since you can't "do" a response, you have to send it/write it/etc.

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Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Fri May 16, 2008 9:50 pm

Ohhh...so then...へんじかきました?
ありません

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Postby basmdb » Fri May 16, 2008 10:14 pm

actualy, it is normal to say へんじした。 Not that へんじをかいた is wrong.

へんじ(を)する= to answer, to reply

to "make" a verb from a certain noun in Japanese you quite often put する after it
(example: とうちゃく-= arrival; とうちゃくする= to arrive)

Don't see する only as "doing/making"

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Postby Erubey » Sat May 17, 2008 12:38 am

But saying that means, I replied, plainly. Basically someone asked you if it's your letter, and you answered "I answered/replied". Do use Kaku or even dropped/lost since someone got it for you.

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Postby InTr4nceWeTrust » Sat May 17, 2008 3:10 am

@basmdb
Thanks for making your first a post to help me out ^_^ I'm not familiar with -した, though. What does that mean? I guess it's the same as -しました?

@Erubey
"あなたのてがみ?はい、へんじしました。" wasn't meant as two people talking. To make it more complete, I meant those two sentences as a reply to someone saying "Did you get my letter?" or "Did you reply to my letter?"
ありません

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Postby lincorp.com » Sat May 17, 2008 5:46 am

[quote="
@Erubey
"あなたのてがみ?はい、へんじしました。" wasn't meant as two people talking. To make it more complete, I meant those two sentences as a reply to someone saying "Did you get my letter?" or "Did you reply to my letter?"[/quote]

How about "はい、きみが送った手紙をもらいましたよ。”

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Postby basmdb » Sat May 17, 2008 10:57 am

@InTr4nceWeTrust

Yes, した and しました both come form the verb する、only difference is that しました is the polite way to say it(its the ~ます-form of a verb)

If you are talking to friends and such you are ok to say した。

@lincorp.com

your sentence sounds about right.

or just say はい、もらったよ/ もらいましたよ。 or はい、届いたよ

personally I would leave the 君が送った手紙 out of it, if you are replying to someone who is mentioning the letter.
something like 私の手紙が届いたの?=>はい、届いたよ

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Postby ryc3 » Sun Jul 27, 2008 12:04 pm

anyone interested in learning japanese and have a Nintendo DS should buy this http://www.amazon.com/UBI-Soft-16428-Ja ... B001BZ8EX8 It's out in Stores according to Amazon on September 16, 2008.

みんなさんがんばてください! ^^
はじめまして俺はライスです。よろしくね。

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Postby Kathstandsalone » Tue Jul 29, 2008 2:08 am

I've 3 questions! Please help me understand, if you could.

This is DBSK's new single. Let's analyze the title.
どうして君を好きになってしまったんだろう.

1. I'd like to ask why is 'を' used in front of '好き'?

From what I've learnt ...
suki is not a verb, hence wo cannot be used. wo is used before a verb, right so why?

2. ~te shimatta form. Does it have a feeling of regret? like an unfortunate sense. So in this title, the person feels that it's a regret to have fallen for the girl.

3. darou has an uncertainty feel to it. Maybe this is the culture of how Japanese speaks?
The guy has a regretful uncertainty of why he has fallen for the girl?
Much appreciated if anyone can help. Thanks. :D
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Postby ruisu » Tue Jul 29, 2008 2:49 am

I think #1 is the only one I can answer, but I'll try the others:

1. I'd like to ask why is 'を' used in front of '好き'?
好く is a verb

2. ~te shimatta form. Does it have a feeling of regret? like an unfortunate sense. So in this title, the person feels that it's a regret to have fallen for the girl.
I think here it's なる then しまう

Tae Kim has a some examples of しまう・しまいました. Here are a couple of examples I used to study with...they have a helper sentence to help remember the point. Also, notice that the しまいました parts are attached to the te-form of the verbs (same in the title of the song).
a. 財布をなくしてしまいました。だから、今はぜんぜんお金がありません。
Unfortunately, I lost my wallet. So now I have no money.

b. コンピュータが壊れてしまいました。だから、ぜんぜん仕事ができません。
Unfortunately, the computer broke. Therefore I can't do any work.

君を好きになってしまったんだろう kinda of like he couldn't help but becoming fond of her.

3. darou has an uncertainty feel to it. Maybe this is the culture of how Japanese speaks?
The way I learned だろう was as "probably"

I'm probably wrong but I'm gonna guess it means "why! i probably fell for you [by accident]..." But actually, I would like to see the real answers! :lol
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Postby zenitse » Thu Jul 31, 2008 2:49 pm

1. "suku" may be a verb (although I have never heard anybody use it), but "suki" is not a form of "suku", but a na-adjective. And I doubt you could use pattern "verb-ni naru" anyway.

Not that I can justify why wo is used. I would use ga.

2. you're right, it has a feeling of regret

3. there are many ways how to translate darou/deshou, depending on the context. Here, I would say "I wonder why...". Indeed it adds the uncertainty.

And concerning the letter above ... personally, I would say "henji suru" (not kaku, even if it was written letter) and "tegami ga todoita" instead of "tegami wo moratta". And "kimi" and "moraimashita" in one sentence sounds weird to me, as "moraimashita" is formal, and "kimi" is the word I would advise you to avoid. If you know the name of the person addressed, use it instead.

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Postby quashlo » Fri Aug 01, 2008 2:42 am

1. を is sometimes used with 好き... It has to do with the subject already being marked with が, so you can't use it again. The "complete" form of your sentence is really

どうして僕が君を好きになってしまったんだろう。

But the 僕が has simply been omitted, leaving 君を好き etc.

2. しまう generally has two meanings:

a) doing something completely, or to the end
e.g. 酒をやめてしまいました
"give up drinking"

b) express regret
e.g. 忘れてしまった or 忘れちゃった
"forgot (something valuable, important, etc.)"

3. だろう marks a question, implies doubt, uncertainty, etc.
The sentence probably translates best as "Why did I fall in love with you?" or "Why did I have to fall in love with you?"
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Postby katzenjammin' » Fri Aug 01, 2008 2:33 pm

Okay, I can't for the life of me remember how to say this:

How do you say that you've become able to do something? Like, "I've become able to speak Japanese?"

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Postby Kathstandsalone » Fri Aug 01, 2008 2:55 pm

quashlo wrote:1. を is sometimes used with 好き... It has to do with the subject already being marked with が, so you can't use it again. The "complete" form of your sentence is really

どうして僕が君を好きになってしまったんだろう。

But the 僕が has simply been omitted, leaving 君を好き etc.

2. しまう generally has two meanings:

a) doing something completely, or to the end
e.g. 酒をやめてしまいました
"give up drinking"

b) express regret
e.g. 忘れてしまった or 忘れちゃった
"forgot (something valuable, important, etc.)"

3. だろう marks a question, implies doubt, uncertainty, etc.
The sentence probably translates best as "Why did I fall in love with you?" or "Why did I have to fall in love with you?"


Ahhh! I see. The subject being marked with ga hence can't use it again. Thanks for helping me to see the longer version of the sentence. Now, I understand better and can appreciate the song title more. Thanks :=)

Thanks Zenitse and Ruisu for your answers too. ^_^

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Postby san_kurogane » Fri Aug 01, 2008 3:22 pm

katzenjammin' wrote:Okay, I can't for the life of me remember how to say this:

How do you say that you've become able to do something? Like, "I've become able to speak Japanese?"


There is a verb form that I don't know the name of, but it changes the verb meaning to "to be able to (your verb)"

I speak.
喋る

I can speak.
喋られる。

I've become able to speak Japanese.
日本語で喋られる事に成りました。
Japan-TV Fansubs http://jtv-drama.net

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Postby zenitse » Fri Aug 01, 2008 10:31 pm

I would prefer to say "shabereru you ni narimashita". The mentioned form is called potential form (可能形).

edit: now I noticed .. you've written it incorrectly, "shaberareru" is a passive form, potential form is only "shabereru".

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Postby san_kurogane » Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:38 pm

You are right.
Japan-TV Fansubs http://jtv-drama.net

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Postby iceniteycl » Tue Aug 05, 2008 11:22 pm

This is cool! I going to read all the posts. Sweet....

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Postby incredibleman » Mon Aug 11, 2008 9:00 pm

if i want to say "good luck" and "take are"???

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Postby guadel_05 » Mon Aug 11, 2008 9:46 pm

good luck is gambatte kudasai
take care is kiotsukete

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Postby albertoavena » Mon Aug 18, 2008 5:30 am

Quick question here.

Is for example 忘れてしまいました and 忘れられてしまいました/忘れられちゃった - is one just more stronger as in more feeling of regret?
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Postby quashlo » Tue Aug 19, 2008 1:56 am

I don't really understand the question, as it's not the degree of regret, just that the second one is passive.

i.e.,
忘れてしまった
[subject] has (regretfully, completely) forgotten

忘れられてしまった
[subject] has been (regretfully, completely) forgotten
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Postby albertoavena » Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:00 am

Ah, I see thanks. I actually figured it out. After I read my post again, it sort of clicked. When I was studying the passive forms, I had a bit of trouble understanding the concept but I get it now

どうも。。。
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Postby niwa1985 » Tue Aug 19, 2008 11:31 am

It definately depends on the context.
The passive form has much more functions than just being a passive form.

It can for example also be a form of respect.
(for example when describing actions of a person higher in rank)

In this case, its probably the third function of the passive: The passive can also be used, when something happenes spontaneously, without the subjects interference. This fits quite well here. Perhaps the subject in your second sentence fogot about something due to an illness (like Alzheimer), for example.

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Postby becky_49 » Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:35 pm

Oooh...lots of pages to look through later, but quick question -

Is there a casual form of saying 'thanks'? I've noticed that on interviews and shows, if someone is praising another person or making a nice comment, the person rarely replies 'arigatou'. Instead, it sounds something like 'ah uush'. :scratch: Is that just them saying it quickly, or are they actually using a different term?

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Postby japchinman » Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:00 pm

:w00t:

みんなさん
 こんにちは、私はドンです。 はじめまして。
どうぞよろしくおねがいします。
私は20才です
日本語を勉強するはとてもすきです
かなり楽しいですから。ね?

Hello everybody. Good afternoon My name is Don.
Its nice to meet everybody, please be kind to me.
I'm 20 years old.
I really enjoy studying Japanese, Its just so incredibly Fun. Isn't it?


Please help me too, And Hopefully I'll be able to help others aswell.

がんばってくださいね。 そうしてがんばりますよ

ーーーーbecky_49ーーーー

Thank you.

--Doumo どうもー very casual, say to probably very close friends or to ones of your family
-- Arigatou ありがとう -  pretty casual aswell.
--doumo arigatou どうもありがとう ----more appropriate when your not a close associate to the person your thanking
--arigatou gozaimasu ありがとうございます---more appropriate when your not a close associate to the person your thanking *I recommend*

--doumo arigatou gozaimasu - どうもありがとうございますーー much more polite then the above.

Situations to use. say your in japan someone you don't know gives you back something you forgot. -- Ah. Arigatou gozaimasu. ありがとうございます

if your CLOSE friend or boy/girl friend gives your a nice present -- Arigatou.. ありがとう

ーーif you just got hired for a new job and just recieved your call that your hired. Arigatou gozaimashita-
ありがとうございました  -- past tense, (thank you for what you did)
we don't really change our thanks for a past situation, however the japanese do.

Hope this helps you! :cheers:

みんなさん、よろしくおねがいしますねー everyone pleased to meet you.
がんばりましょうね。- Lets do our best (together)
じゃ。。。 失礼します。   -well then Excuse me ( literally I'm going to commit a rudeness. You can say it pretty much when your about to leave! very often said.
またね。--- Im off, I'll see you late, later
元気で  --  keep well

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Postby quashlo » Sun Aug 24, 2008 2:52 am

becky_49 wrote:Is there a casual form of saying 'thanks'? I've noticed that on interviews and shows, if someone is praising another person or making a nice comment, the person rarely replies 'arigatou'. Instead, it sounds something like 'ah uush'. scratch Is that just them saying it quickly, or are they actually using a different term?


Perhaps you are thinking of あざーっす (azaassu) or some shortened, informal variation of ありがとうございます (arigatou gozaimasu). It's extremely informal and is mostly used by teens or young people, especially males, but should probably never be used in other situations, as it would be considered crude and ill-mannered.
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Postby noobee » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:46 pm

thank you
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