Let's learn Japanese....

Talk about the culture and entertainment from Nihon.
nihongojin
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Postby nihongojin » Sat Mar 05, 2011 7:43 pm

I could be wrong, but I don't believe 夜中 has any specific time defined by it other than it just literally meaning "middle of the night."

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Postby nihongojin » Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:56 am

Conner MacDermott wrote:Does anyone know what do the "S", "M" and "U" mean in Unubore Deka episode 3?

Thanks.

Any extra info you can give on this one? Haven't seen this series, but could probably download the episode at hand to have a look, but having a general time in the episode for when this pops up would be helpful.

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Postby Conner MacDermott » Wed Mar 09, 2011 3:06 pm

ねぇ Nihongojin

I apologise for not expressing myself properly earlier.

The abbreviations of S, M, and U occurs many times in the episode at various times, so I guess they must be used for some kind of running gag. From the context of child birth, settling down, and etc, I presume S and M stands for Single and Married respectively. Please correct me if I am wrong.

However, I still have not figured out what does U stand for.

Near the end of the episode, Unubore-san was asked by the apprehended criminal who he is. His reply is "I am U", which makes no sense to me. Did he reply with "I am [U]nubore" or "I am [U]nloved", considering that he had just proposed to her minutes ago?

また ありがとう ございます
mata arigatou gozaimasu.

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Postby nihongojin » Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:25 am

Conner MacDermott wrote:ねぇ Nihongojin

I apologise for not expressing myself properly earlier.

The abbreviations of S, M, and U occurs many times in the episode at various times, so I guess they must be used for some kind of running gag. From the context of child birth, settling down, and etc, I presume S and M stands for Single and Married respectively. Please correct me if I am wrong.

However, I still have not figured out what does U stand for.

Near the end of the episode, Unubore-san was asked by the apprehended criminal who he is. His reply is "I am U", which makes no sense to me. Did he reply with "I am [U]nubore" or "I am [U]nloved", considering that he had just proposed to her minutes ago?

また ありがとう ございます
mata arigatou gozaimasu.

Ended up watching just the portion at the end, and I'm fairly certain the S and M at hand are the usual sadomasochism and masochism.

As for the U, I'm guessing it's a bit of an inside joke for this series. Haven't really watched too much so it's hard to say, but even at the end when he replied with the "I'm U," other other two people behind him had no clue what he was talking about.

Hop that helped out a tiny bit. :D

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Postby MiRiNHa » Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:15 pm

apartofmylife wrote:gozen rei ji is the right yomikata

Romance wrote:The correct way to write reiji is 零時.Rei means zero.
 
Reiji indicates time while yonaka simply is the word for midnight, middle of the night.


nihongojin wrote:I could be wrong, but I don't believe 夜中 has any specific time defined by it other than it just literally meaning "middle of the night."


遅くでも皆本当にありがとうー!

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Postby Keiko1981 » Tue Mar 22, 2011 7:28 pm

I'd just like to have some suggestions.
How do you think I should write Japanese names if I want to include both Romaji, Kanji and Hiragana.

Kabe Amon 加部亜門 (かべ あもん)
Kabe Amon (加部亜門) [かべ あもん]
Kabe Amon (加部亜門 / かべ あもん)

I think it would be fun having all three versions in that way you can easier pick up how different Kanjis can be pronounced.
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Postby ryc3 » Fri Apr 15, 2011 8:37 am

Keiko1981 wrote:I'd just like to have some suggestions.
How do you think I should write Japanese names if I want to include both Romaji, Kanji and Hiragana.

Kabe Amon 加部亜門 (かべ あもん)
Kabe Amon (加部亜門) [かべ あもん]
Kabe Amon (加部亜門 / かべ あもん)

I think it would be fun having all three versions in that way you can easier pick up how different Kanjis can be pronounced.


I honestly say the Kanji alone is fine. If people ask how to read it then you can tell them how is it read.

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Postby kiramethyst » Wed May 18, 2011 8:28 am

MiRiNHa wrote:
apartofmylife wrote:gozen rei ji is the right yomikata

Romance wrote:The correct way to write reiji is 零時.Rei means zero.
 
Reiji indicates time while yonaka simply is the word for midnight, middle of the night.


nihongojin wrote:I could be wrong, but I don't believe 夜中 has any specific time defined by it other than it just literally meaning "middle of the night."


遅くでも皆本当にありがとうー!


夜中usually refers to the time between midnight and 2am.

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Postby Nemi79 » Tue Jun 07, 2011 8:26 am

Is this the place where I may ask questions about Japanese grammar and such?
I am currently learning Japanese, and I am kind of stuck on one task.
My class is currently learning past tense short forms of verbs, i-adjectives, na-adjectives and nouns.

The sentance I am wondring about is when the main sentance is : "ii tenki".
In politeform this would be ii tenki desu, right? So will the sentance then in short form be: Ii tenki da?

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Postby theuncontactable » Tue Jun 07, 2011 9:31 am

ii tenki degozaimasu. [not really sure if this is correct because I'm not very familiar with Keigo.(Keigo or honorifics)
ii tenki desu. (polite form)
ii tenki da. (casual form)
ii tenki. (I think this is call: predicate form = even more casual)

Basically the more you have to say or write for the same sentence means the more polite it is.

This has nothing to do with past tense.

Edit: Casual form is more commonly known as plain form.
Last edited by theuncontactable on Tue Jun 07, 2011 10:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Nemi79 » Tue Jun 07, 2011 9:40 am

Thank you :) Then we are probably supposed to make it Ii tenki da in this task :)

Thanks so much for answering.

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Postby vjvjugz » Sun Jun 12, 2011 5:01 pm

nihongojin wrote:
Conner MacDermott wrote:Does anyone know what do the "S", "M" and "U" mean in Unubore Deka episode 3?

Thanks.

Any extra info you can give on this one? Haven't seen this series, but could probably download the episode at hand to have a look, but having a general time in the episode for when this pops up would be helpful.


Hi! new here :).

Anyway, the letters mean:

S - Sadist
M - Masochist
U - Unidentified/Unknown/Unclear (something that does not fill up either being an S or an M)

It actually describes how you are in a relationship, or maybe simply as a person. S or Sadists are the one who likes to hurt people/(or his/her partner). M or Masochists are those who likes being hurt, or finds pleasure in being hurt by other people. And Unidentified or simply U, are people who doesn't fall in the previous categories.

:). Just finished Unubore Deka, so sad that the ratings are really low, it is a good show, despite being too overacted, but is actually the point of the whole drama. Hoping for a season 2!

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Postby Keiko1981 » Fri Jun 17, 2011 4:43 pm

I need some help with what's written on a note below the drawn picture.
[spoiler]Image[/spoiler].
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Postby emma-ba » Fri Jun 17, 2011 4:55 pm

Keiko1981 wrote:I need some help with what's written on a note below the drawn picture.
[spoiler]Image[/spoiler].



藤村先生にお弁当作ったの。
I made Fujimura-sensei a packed lunch

名付けて愛の5時起き弁当!
I named it Wake up at 5am Lunch of Love!

直子
Naoko

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Postby Keiko1981 » Fri Jun 17, 2011 5:12 pm

emma-ba wrote:
Keiko1981 wrote:I need some help with what's written on a note below the drawn picture.
[spoiler]Image[/spoiler].



藤村先生にお弁当作ったの。
I made Fujimura-sensei a packed lunch

名付けて愛の5時起き弁当!
I named it Wake up at 5am Lunch of Love!

直子
Naoko

Thank you very much emma-ba. :)

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Postby Keiko1981 » Thu Aug 04, 2011 3:47 pm

I need a little help here for the Koukou Kyoushi 1993 episode 7 subs. Should I use "obaa-chan" or "oba-chan".
Reading here: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_does_the ... achan_mean
It sounds as if "obaa-chan" more appropriate.

Two men sitting in a bar drinking beer.
(In the hardsubbed version the following is written)
"Obachan, one more beer, please."
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Postby emma-ba » Thu Aug 04, 2011 3:54 pm

I agree with wiki-answers. Use Oba-chan if she looks middle-aged, Obaa-chan if she's obviously quite old and looks like a grandma.

If you've got a subbed version though, can you hear whether they're saying obachan or obaachan?

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Postby Keiko1981 » Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:04 pm

emma-ba wrote:I agree with wiki-answers. Use Oba-chan if she looks middle-aged, Obaa-chan if she's obviously quite old and looks like a grandma.
If you've got a subbed version though, can you hear whether they're saying obachan or obaachan?

I will keep the original.

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Postby ices56 » Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:00 pm

Hi, I have learned some basic Japanese grammar from sites and trying to looking forward to build up my vocab. Thought it would be a good idea to collect them from pop songs. If anyone can, please suggest some useful song links along with the lyrics in English, I think it's an easier way to remember.

For example, I have picked up the theme song of "Otomen" by Kou Shibasaki, but not very sure if these are very common words..(trying to understand the meaning now ... :D)
[spoiler]
yo musue nagekanaide otonathachi
sore demo imano
futari no kokoro junsui sono mono
suki na kimino soba ni itsumo itai
te wo tsunagu dare de mune wo gyutto shimetsukeru
i will love you forever
kawashita yakosuku mamorinuku
kanashimu uso nado tsukanai
dakara hoka no hito minaide
zutto atashino koto dake miteite
you know my soul hanaretaku nai yo join my life
koi shiyou futari motto
darling! aishiteru yo nante
hoka no ko ni ittari shinaide ne
so i know kowarenai you ni zutto
i cant live without you
who keeps loving you!
song link : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlnt8TDpvEg
[/spoiler]
Last edited by ices56 on Thu Oct 27, 2011 5:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby SaruSurfer » Thu Oct 27, 2011 3:16 am

Everything except for the first phrase is typical English and Japanese lyrics.

世も末 Yomosue (Buddist term for expressing the end of the world or a hopeless world)

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Postby ices56 » Thu Oct 27, 2011 8:45 pm

SaruSurfer wrote:Everything except for the first phrase is typical English and Japanese lyrics.

世も末 Yomosue (Buddist term for expressing the end of the world or a hopeless world)

thanks, i thought musue is a different word and was searching for meaning .... lol, now it makes sense.

now, pl tell me how "te wo tsunagu dare de mune wo gyutto shimetsukeru" means "just by holdding hands my chest clams tightly"...
"te wo tsunagu" is holding hands, "mune wo gyutto" is chest, tightly and i did not find a meaning of shimetsukeru (does it mean thumping? )
well, then what is the purpose of "dare de" here, does it indicate "this chest/ some chest" or something like that ? :scratch:

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Postby Ethlenn » Thu Oct 27, 2011 9:08 pm

Shimetsukeru (締め付ける) means "to tighten", to "grasp/embrace tighter".

And about "yomosue" it's not the end of the world, because "yo" indicates the "life one is living". There is "kono yo" meaning "life" (indeed a Buddhist term) and "ano yo" - "netherworld, other world"
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Postby emma-ba » Thu Oct 27, 2011 10:26 pm

@ices56: From reading various definitions of and example sentences with 世も末, its current usage seems to be equivalent to "what is the world coming to?" in that you can't believe something so bad/unwanted has happened.
Last edited by emma-ba on Fri Oct 28, 2011 6:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby SaruSurfer » Thu Oct 27, 2011 11:24 pm

Ethlenn

世も末 - この世も終わりであること,救いがたい世であること Kono Yo is like the world around oneself so I guess it can be defined as life. End of one's existence is this world.

emma-ba

Yeah lately its been used for "what is this world coming to?"

ices56

手を繋ぐだけで Your lyrics has a typo Te wo tsunagu dakede
Last edited by SaruSurfer on Thu Oct 27, 2011 11:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Ethlenn » Thu Oct 27, 2011 11:35 pm

Hm, from the definition provided it looks like "the ending moment of life, the hard-to-save moment of life".
About the modern usage I don't know and I don't care, I translate Heian/Taisho stuff.
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Postby ices56 » Sun Oct 30, 2011 9:27 pm

minaa, arigatou ! those posts were very helpful.

Ethlenn, emma-ba, SaruSurfer, "what is this world coming to?" seems more a match, with the subtitle of the song. also, thanks for the typo correction it makes sense now "only holding your hand my heart thumps tightly"....

i got most other word meanings by searching google and eudict.com, but still have few questions. however matching with the sub of the song it becomes understandable.

i will post those queries tomorrow when i come back from work, meanwhile please someone write me the lyrics (Japanese in English alphabets please, i m illiterate in Japanese :mrgreen: ) of the theme song of "Erai Tokoro ni Totside Shimatta", i only understand few words in that song..... (yanawaraba - haikei)

torrents are here:
http://www.d-addicts.com/forum/torrents ... +all&sort=
but seems the theme song has no seeds, so, here is one youtube link i found, the song starts from 0:45 ::
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiEkzaeIlOk

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Postby emma-ba » Sun Oct 30, 2011 9:33 pm

@ices56
This website has the lyrics in romaji and an English translation
http://www.kiwi-musume.com/lyrics/yanaw ... oosan.html

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Postby ices56 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:58 pm

so, here we go, i am back with these few queries (shiete kudasai, onegai !! or what is more appropriate to request for an answer :mrgreen: ) :

# kawashita yakosuku mamorinuku -> "will protect the said promise" : as it seems, is the ku form in sense like "i will" ?
# hoka no ko ni ittari shinaide ne -> what is the meaning of "ittari" and shinaide ? & what is the base form of "shinaide", shinai ?

that's it from there, i really enjoyed how Japanese ppl form their sentences, like "zutto atashino koto dake miteite" literally means "only hang with me continuously"..lol.. :clap:

emma-ba wrote:@ices56
This website has the lyrics in romaji and an English translation
http://www.kiwi-musume.com/lyrics/yanaw ... oosan.html

thanks, emma for the link, it looks a bit long, but i m gonna try decipher it and will come back .. :D :cheers:

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Postby Ethlenn » Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:08 pm

ices56 wrote:so, here we go, i am back with these few queries (shiete kudasai, onegai !! or what is more appropriate to request for an answer :mrgreen: ) :

# kawashita yakosuku mamorinuku -> "will protect the said promise" : as it seems, is the ku form in sense like "i will" ?
# hoka no ko ni ittari shinaide ne -> what is the meaning of "ittari" and shinaide ? & what is the base form of "shinaide", shinai ?

that's it from there, i really enjoyed how Japanese ppl form their sentences, like "zutto atashino koto dake miteite" literally means "only hang with me continuously"..lol.. :clap:



1. it's oshiete kudasai
2. yakusoku
3. mamorinuku - compound verb (this is where kanji/hiragana come in handy, you know?) - "to protect till the end" (守り抜く)
4. ittari - -tari form of the verb iku
5. shinaide - -te form in negative aspect from the verb "suru".

Learn some proper grammar from Genki or Minna and then start to translate, OK?
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Postby ices56 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:26 pm

thanks for the suggestion, i will take look at genki, or may be minna too, if i find the link../.. but i thought figuring out the meaning and grammar by listening and reading is faster way of learning a language for communication purposes, than starting with the grammar at the very beginning .....

thanks for your help !!

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Postby Ethlenn » Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:39 pm

One simply can't walk into Mordor of Japanese grammar basing on songs, sorry.
http://nihongo-dekimasu.blogspot.com/
This blog has them all.
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Postby emma-ba » Mon Oct 31, 2011 10:50 pm

ices56 wrote:thanks for the suggestion, i will take look at genki, or may be minna too, if i find the link../.. but i thought figuring out the meaning and grammar by listening and reading is faster way of learning a language for communication purposes, than starting with the grammar at the very beginning .....


You need a basic amount of grammar before you can start working stuff out for yourself. I'd recommend Tae Kim's Grammar Guide as well and you could look at anki srs if you wanted some vocab flashcards. You can make your own or download ones that other people have made.

http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar
http://ankisrs.net/
Last edited by emma-ba on Thu Nov 03, 2011 11:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby SaruSurfer » Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:27 pm

When I first learned English it was through textbooks so I was able to read English but when it came to conversation I sucked. :lol

Later on I was able to improve upon my linguistic skills by listening to music everyday. Music is a good way to learn but you really need to learn the basics first.

Good luck learning Japanese. :)
がんばれー!

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Postby ices56 » Thu Nov 03, 2011 10:32 pm

thank you all for the encouragement, support and links. i will keep on trying forward to learn this language. even though i think learning songs and poetry is the easiest way to build up vocab, as memorizing them is easier than reading pages, like we learned "Mary had a little lamb" in kindergarten, i also think its necessary to learn grammar at some point.

thank you all for the links, they will be much helpful in coming days for my advancement in learning Japanese language. :lol

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Postby Keiko1981 » Tue Nov 22, 2011 4:13 pm

Need a little help here.

Person A and B is having a fight.
Person B says "hanashite yo" and then leaves/wants to be left alone.
What should it be translated to?
"Let me go!" or "Shut up!" any of it correct?
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Postby danburi » Tue Nov 22, 2011 5:32 pm

Keiko1981 wrote:Person B says "hanashite yo" and then leaves/wants to be left alone.
What should it be translated to?
"Let me go!" or "Shut up!" any of it correct?
"Let me go" is exactly right.

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Postby Keiko1981 » Tue Nov 22, 2011 6:16 pm

danburi wrote:
Keiko1981 wrote:Person B says "hanashite yo" and then leaves/wants to be left alone.
What should it be translated to?
"Let me go!" or "Shut up!" any of it correct?
"Let me go" is exactly right.

Thank you. :)

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Postby Keiko1981 » Fri Dec 23, 2011 9:11 am

When giving away gifts.
How do I write in a short way.

To (a) girl age 4-7 from (my name)
and
To (a) boy age 4-7 from (my name)

Edit I have gotten an answer to this. Thanks to the one helping. :)
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Postby Keiko1981 » Wed Dec 28, 2011 3:11 pm

I need help with some japanese word. I don't know how to translate it.
First some information about the scene.

It's about telephone messages.
First is the parts I have translated.

"You have one new message."
- Call me when you get home, I'm at home.

Then it says something like.
"Oriwashita" = End of message?
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Postby galbilover » Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:59 pm

http://www.japanesedictionary.org/

Good Japanese English dictionary for beginners. :)

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Postby Keiko1981 » Sat Jan 07, 2012 12:15 am

galbilover wrote:http://www.japanesedictionary.org/
Good Japanese English dictionary for beginners. :)

Thank you, helped to answer my above question.
Owari = End.

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Postby KoiNeko » Sat Jan 07, 2012 2:35 am

I think it was "Owarimashita", a polite form of "(It's) done / complete / finished." or "I finished it".

As for "Hanashite yo!" it could have been something like "I'm telling you [to leave me alone]" or "I'm talking to you [and you still don't understand] or "That's all I had to say [so leave me alone]". Just a guess.

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Postby Keiko1981 » Tue Jan 24, 2012 7:42 pm

I have a sentence that's already translated.
"Doesn't that matter to you?" then the speaker says "sou na no"

Looking up "sou na" means something like "No way!" or "That can't be!"

Can I write it like following:
"Doesn't that matter to you, does it?"
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Postby emma-ba » Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:02 pm

It's quite a general phrase. If you look at these examples you can probably work out which one fits the context you have.

http://eow.alc.co.jp/%E3%81%9D%E3%81%86 ... -8/?ref=sa

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Postby rootabega » Sun Feb 05, 2012 4:58 am

I just wrote my first kanji exam, and I just wanted to say:

I can't believe I survived the experience!! :goggle: :goggle: :goggle:

Won't know if I passed for 5 weeks, though... :unsure:


Ahhhhh......that was some stress :pale:

But I survived....
Must watch some J-dorama (with English subs) to relax......

P.S. This is the test I took (only level 10):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji_kentei#Level_10

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Postby KoiNeko » Sun Feb 05, 2012 9:02 am

Keiko1981 wrote:I have a sentence that's already translated.
"Doesn't that matter to you?" then the speaker says "sou na no"

Looking up "sou na" means something like "No way!" or "That can't be!"

Can I write it like following:
"Doesn't that matter to you, does it?"


The sentence "Doesn't that matter to you, does it?" would consist of two questions and it does not sound correct in English (to me).

This kind of structure usually contains a non-question statement (a guess, a thesis or a provocative statement) and then a question, to which we expect a response.
Usually, a negation in first part is not followed by a negation in second part.

Examples:

'You are a doctor, aren't you?'
'You aren't that stupid, are you?'
'Doesn't make sense at all, does it?'

So, to me, it would be '"It doesn't (really) matter to you, does it?"
or '"It does matter to you, doesn't it?"

To stress the need for response you would follow a question with another question, but as a separate sentence. For example:
"Doesn't that matter to you? Doesn't that matter at all?"
"Don't you see that it's true? Don't you see it at all?"
"Does it make sense? Does it finally make sense to you?"

That said, I do not know the original context and only commented the English sentence for you.

Keep up the good work.
Kind regards.

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Postby salaryman » Tue Feb 07, 2012 4:40 pm

an interesting way to help you learn japanese , it helps if you have some basic knowledge , is watch ayaka's suprize english lesson. you can learn japanese by watching japanese learn english. its fun too.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=ayaka%27s+surprise+english+lesson&oq=ayaka%27s+surprise+english+lesson&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=286784l288639l0l288966l11l11l2l7l7l0l314l410l1.3-1l2l0

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Postby Gir » Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:56 pm

[quote="salaryman"]an interesting way to help you learn japanese , it helps if you have some basic knowledge , is watch ayaka's suprize english lesson. you can learn japanese by watching japanese learn english. its fun too.

I downloaded those from somewhere a long time ago, I particularly like the ones with Yaguchi Mari in them. They can be quite fun to watch.
If you can remain calm while all around you others are panicking... Then you obviously have not adequately assessed the situation.

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Postby ryc3 » Mon Feb 20, 2012 12:22 am

rootabega wrote:I ..

P.S. This is the test I took (only level 10):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji_kentei#Level_10


I think the Kanken level 10 is too easy.

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Postby emma-ba » Mon Feb 20, 2012 12:29 am

ryc3 wrote:
rootabega wrote:I ..

P.S. This is the test I took (only level 10):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji_kentei#Level_10


I think the Kanken level 10 is too easy.


What exactly is too easy about it?

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Postby ryc3 » Mon Feb 20, 2012 3:04 am

emma-ba wrote:
What exactly is too easy about it?


basic kanji. reading and writing of 80 different ones. stroke and count orders of each kanji. If you know the basic first grade kanji fairly well you should be able to pass it. level 1 is the hardest one. Here's a video of me passing level 10.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgWKYW7ezLY&list=UU5HdySvo-AslCaPKcRuHBoA&index=13&feature=plcp

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Postby emma-ba » Mon Feb 20, 2012 9:00 am

ryc3 wrote:
emma-ba wrote:
What exactly is too easy about it?


basic kanji. reading and writing of 80 different ones. stroke and count orders of each kanji. If you know the basic first grade kanji fairly well you should be able to pass it. level 1 is the hardest one. Here's a video of me passing level 10.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgWKYW7ezLY&list=UU5HdySvo-AslCaPKcRuHBoA&index=13&feature=plcp


You can't really say it's 'too easy'. It's an exam aimed at native kids who've done their first year at school so that's what it tests...

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Postby rootabega » Tue Feb 21, 2012 4:47 am

ryc3:
You make me cry, you big meanie :cussing: JOKING. :D
Believe me, it was no picnic sitting in a classroom full of little kids, many of whom were writing a tougher level than I was.
I wrote that post right after taking the exam, so it does sound pretty melodramatic. I hope I didn't scare anyone off. Many people will find studying easier than I did. I have a particularly poor memory and even poorer handwriting. I owe a lot to my tutor - he is truly a patient guy.
The Kanken is often overlooked by those taking the JLPT, but it offers unique challenges and rewards. The JLPT is simply not equipped to test kanji knowledge in depth. For those of us who gravitate more to the written language than to conversation, the Kanken is a very good way to assess one's progress.
I am now studying for Level 9 (test is at the end of June). It doesn't get any easier, but I couldn't imagine quitting! :-)
Last edited by rootabega on Tue Feb 21, 2012 4:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby raingirl » Mon Mar 05, 2012 5:29 am

salaryman wrote:an interesting way to help you learn japanese , it helps if you have some basic knowledge , is watch ayaka's suprize english lesson. you can learn japanese by watching japanese learn english. its fun too.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=ayaka%27s+surprise+english+lesson&oq=ayaka%27s+surprise+english+lesson&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=286784l288639l0l288966l11l11l2l7l7l0l314l410l1.3-1l2l0


This one is nice, thanks for sharing! I am also learning Nihongo (but not kanji, just romanized words like domo arigato) and I always make use of podcasts (japanesepod101) and videos from Youtube (my favorites are from GenkiJapanNet). I also have this pocket tutorial book slash dictionary that I got from a book sale.

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Postby rootabega » Thu Mar 15, 2012 5:00 pm

Woo hoo! I passed my Kanji Kentei! :cheers:
OK, so it was only level 10, so I shouldn't be bragging in a public forum. :roll
Now I'm busy studying for level 9.
Go, kanji fans!! You can do it! :D

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Postby koalachan » Wed Mar 21, 2012 5:51 pm

hi guys!

how to say the following in japanese in a good/pleasant/joking way? (in kanji if possible)

"you and your foul mouth as usual!"

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Postby Keiko1981 » Sat Mar 24, 2012 11:45 am

Is there some way to know how the name is spelled if I don't have any hiragana.
高沢
Takasawa or Takazawa.

This is what I got form the Rikaichan addon (FireFox)

Names Dictionary
高沢 たかさわ
Takasawa (p,s)
高沢 たかざわ
Takazawa (p,s)

What does the 'p' and 's' stand for?
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Postby Ethlenn » Sat Mar 24, 2012 11:55 am

There are few Takazawa, and few Takasawa in Japan, so I guess it depends on the individual usage.
高沢 順子(たかざわ じゅんこ): Takazawa Junko
高沢奈苗- Takasawa Nanae
http://www.takasawa.co.jp/ - company
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Postby Keiko1981 » Sat Mar 24, 2012 12:09 pm

Ethlenn wrote:There are few Takazawa, and few Takasawa in Japan, so I guess it depends on the individual usage.
高沢 順子(たかざわ じゅんこ): Takazawa Junko
高沢奈苗- Takasawa Nanae
http://www.takasawa.co.jp/ - company

I just wondered if there was some way to know, there's someone acting as Takasawa/Takazawa.

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Postby arakira » Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:28 pm

koalachan wrote:hi guys!

how to say the following in japanese in a good/pleasant/joking way? (in kanji if possible)

"you and your foul mouth as usual!"


Well I'd say 相変わらずの口汚いな. But then my Japanese is only colloquial and pretty rude^^

@Keiko1981 sometimes you might find hiragana at the japanese wiki page for a drama or...you might find out by closely listening to the way the person is adressed there...

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Postby kiramethyst » Mon Jul 16, 2012 2:44 pm

arakira wrote:
koalachan wrote:hi guys!

how to say the following in japanese in a good/pleasant/joking way? (in kanji if possible)

"you and your foul mouth as usual!"


Well I'd say 相変わらずの口汚いな. But then my Japanese is only colloquial and pretty rude^^

@Keiko1981 sometimes you might find hiragana at the japanese wiki page for a drama or...you might find out by closely listening to the way the person is adressed there...


You could use 失礼だ in place of 口汚い I think.

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Postby Abdsuda » Thu Jul 19, 2012 8:45 pm

Hey~ I'm just going to jump in here and ask a quick question~! Is anyone interested in skyping in Japanese with me? I've taken one class, been learning on my own after that & wondering if anyone wants to practice with me... ^^ I watch lots of dramas so we'd have plenty to talk about! :D

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Postby xnopex » Fri Jul 20, 2012 12:16 am

you can find a lot of language partners on livemocha. i use it for french and portuguese

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Postby Abdsuda » Fri Jul 20, 2012 1:12 am

xnopex wrote:you can find a lot of language partners on livemocha. i use it for french and portuguese


Okay, thanks! ^^

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Postby SylviaSuarez » Mon Sep 24, 2012 10:55 am

xnopex wrote:you can find a lot of language partners on livemocha. i use it for french and portuguese

I've heard a lot of positive things people say about livemocha service. Looks like it's worth paying money for an account there as I'm so eager to learn Japanese!

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Postby TheVicarious » Mon Sep 24, 2012 11:19 am

I've always been wondering what the small japanese words mean. Like I know "wa" is pretty much is/are (?).

But there are many like ni, yo, ga, no, wo, de and more.

Could anyone tell me please what some of these means? :)

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Postby Ethlenn » Mon Sep 24, 2012 11:37 am

TheVicarious wrote:I've always been wondering what the small japanese words mean. Like I know "wa" is pretty much is/are (?).

But there are many like ni, yo, ga, no, wo, de and more.

Could anyone tell me please what some of these means? :)


Those are particles, not words actually they show the grammatical function of the words that precede it. "wa" signifies the topic of the discussion, something broader than subject, subject is marked by "ga".
Ni: marker of exact time, indirect object, place of the state, destination
yo: stressing out particle
ga: subject marker, but also may be used as "but" at the end.
wo: direct object
de: means of doing something (like "by") or marker of the place where action takes place.

"Are/is" is expressed by the copula "de aru/da/desu" or verbs "iru/imasu" "aru/arimasu" depends on what you want to say.

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Postby TheVicarious » Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:16 pm

Ethlenn wrote:

Those are particles, not words actually they show the grammatical function of the words that precede it. "wa" signifies the topic of the discussion, something broader than subject, subject is marked by "ga".
Ni: marker of exact time, indirect object, place of the state, destination
yo: stressing out particle
ga: subject marker, but also may be used as "but" at the end.
wo: direct object
de: means of doing something (like "by") or marker of the place where action takes place.

"Are/is" is expressed by the copula "de aru/da/desu" or verbs "iru/imasu" "aru/arimasu" depends on what you want to say.

And you really wanted to start subbing?


Thanks, that sounded more complicated than I'd had thought.


About subbing I more wanted to know if was a good way to learn. I never said I would pull it off. You gotta start somewhere, you can't just be born allknowing..

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Postby ryc3 » Sat Sep 29, 2012 5:54 am

rootabega wrote:Woo hoo! I passed my Kanji Kentei! :cheers:
OK, so it was only level 10, so I shouldn't be bragging in a public forum. :roll
Now I'm busy studying for level 9.
Go, kanji fans!! You can do it! :D


Good Job, if you have a DS you can practice the Kanji Kentei. There's a Kanken ds kanji game. It basically test you on reading and etc on Kanji.

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Postby rootabega » Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:28 am

ryc3 - I know I'm five months late, but thanks for the tip.
I put off my Kanji Kentei level 9 until this June. Now I have to buckle down and start studying. :sweat:
I am sooo oldschool. I practice my basic single-stroke elements using 25 cent copy books I buy by the dozen in chinatown. I even do a little calligraphy at times, though I am terrible at it. I did seem to have a mini breakthrough a couple of months ago. I'm not as nervous writing kanji as I used to be. All I used to think was "wrong, wrong, fail, fail" and my hand would literally shake when I formed the strokes. :pale: Thankfully, it's not a life-and-death deal anymore every time I pick up my pen. It took a LOT of time for me to begin relaxing a little. I'm sure someone else would have calmed down sooner.

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Postby ryc3 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 5:01 am

rootabega wrote:ryc3 - I know I'm five months late, but thanks for the tip.
I put off my Kanji Kentei level 9 until this June. Now I have to buckle down and start studying. :sweat:
I am sooo oldschool. I practice my basic single-stroke elements using 25 cent copy books I buy by the dozen in chinatown. I even do a little calligraphy at times, though I am terrible at it. I did seem to have a mini breakthrough a couple of months ago. I'm not as nervous writing kanji as I used to be. All I used to think was "wrong, wrong, fail, fail" and my hand would literally shake when I formed the strokes. :pale: Thankfully, it's not a life-and-death deal anymore every time I pick up my pen. It took a LOT of time for me to begin relaxing a little. I'm sure someone else would have calmed down sooner.


I remember cramming for the 10級 Kanji Kentei for 2 days straight playing the DS game and passing it. :X The questions were exactly on the actual test from the game. I don't know how much has it changed since then. This was probably 4 years ago.

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Postby rootabega » Tue Feb 26, 2013 5:25 am

ryc3, it is SO time for me to adopt the new technology. I will be visiting the local electronics store this week! :salut:
PS I know there's been a recent upgrade to the study books, but I believe the questions are largely the same, particularly at the easiest levels.

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Postby ryc3 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 5:32 am

rootabega wrote:ryc3, it is SO time for me to adopt the new technology. I will be visiting the local electronics store this week! :salut:
PS I know there's been a recent upgrade to the study books, but I believe the questions are largely the same, particularly at the easiest levels.


http://www.amazon.com/Zaidanhoujin-Nipp ... B001QXDJE4

Enjoy! I'm working on 8級

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Postby benahod » Tue Apr 30, 2013 1:46 am

I've memorised Hiragana. But never completed to memorise Katakana.

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Postby momst » Tue Apr 30, 2013 2:29 am

I think that 'ichiban' refers to what is the best (the number one thing). It can be used in other contexts besides refering to something that you like the best (such as when you identify the best sports team, movie of the year, etc). It can be used to refer to the number one thing of anything.

I think that daisuke would be like saying you like something very much, more than just a normal 'liking' (suki desu).


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